Researchers find hidden proteins in bacteria

Phys.org | March 20, 2019

Scientists at the University of Illinois at Chicago have developed a way to identify the beginning of every gene—known as a translation start site or a start codon—in bacterial cell DNA with a single experiment and, through this method, they have shown that an individual gene is capable of coding for more than one protein. Historically, the generally taught scientific premise has been that each gene has one unique start site and is responsible for the creation of only one protein. However, the study, which is published in Molecular Cell, a leading journal on the topic of cellular processes, shows that some genes have more than one start site and can specify production of more than one functional protein. Their method of identifying gene start sites relies on a common prescription drug called retapamulin, a topical antibiotic. Retapamulin, they showed for the first time, works by causing the ribosome, which reads genetic code, to become stalled at these start sites, inhibiting translation, a key part of the process by which the genetic code in DNA is used to create proteins.

Spotlight

In this "how-to" video, users of the ImageXpress Micro System will learn ways to adjust the correction collar on the objective to accommodate for different plate bottom or slide thicknesses, thus ensuring optimal image quality.

Spotlight

In this "how-to" video, users of the ImageXpress Micro System will learn ways to adjust the correction collar on the objective to accommodate for different plate bottom or slide thicknesses, thus ensuring optimal image quality.

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