Molecule effective in killing tuberculosis bacteria

Medical Xpress | February 01, 2019

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. and one in France has found a molecule that is effective against tuberculosis. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group identifies the molecule and describes how well it worked when tested in vitro and in a mouse model. Valerie Mizrahi and Digby Warner with the University of Cape Town have authored a Perspective piece on the study in the same journal issue.
As Mizrahi and Warner note, tuberculosis kills more people than any other infectious agent—it kills more than 1.5 million people every year. Tuberculosis is a bacterial infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). This airborne pathogen tends to infect the lungs and is passed from person to person. Back in the 1950s, researchers developed drugs to treat the disease, but since that time, the bacteria have developed resistance—today, almost one-third of all new cases are caused by antimicrobial-resistant strains.

Spotlight

Industrial Biotechnology is made up by different sectors: red biotech (diagnostics, pharmaceuticals), green biotech (production of agents in plants) and white biotech (use of alternative resources, smaller plants with higher efficiency). White biotech becomes more and more attractive to pharmaceutical companies by delivering potential for new multi-product facilities instead of conventional petrochemical processes requiring high physical parameters such as temperature and pressure.

Spotlight

Industrial Biotechnology is made up by different sectors: red biotech (diagnostics, pharmaceuticals), green biotech (production of agents in plants) and white biotech (use of alternative resources, smaller plants with higher efficiency). White biotech becomes more and more attractive to pharmaceutical companies by delivering potential for new multi-product facilities instead of conventional petrochemical processes requiring high physical parameters such as temperature and pressure.

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