Former Investor Caught In College Admission Scam To Fight Legal Battle Over Severance

Bill McGlashan has been caught in a scandal related to college admissions. He is an investor at the Silicon Valley. This 55 years aged financier is presently busy squaring off trade with TPG, which is a buyout company at Texas. He is known to have some profitable shares in companies like Airbnb, Box and Uber. These stakes are considered to be worth few hundred million dollars. TPG is not ready to give any severance to McGlashan. Marc Kasowitz, who is the legal head of the company and has also worked as a lawyer for President Donald Trump commented that the company is not liable to pay to the financier as he is involved in the college admission scandal.

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Autolus Ltd

Autolus is a private biopharmaceutical company, focused on the development and commercialisation of engineered T-cell immunotherapy products with extreme efficacy in the treatment of life-threatening cancers.

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Biotech in 2022

Article | August 16, 2022

The robust global channel of more than, 800 gene and cell curatives presently in trials will produce clinical readouts in 2022, revealing what lies ahead for advanced curatives. The impact will be felt in 2022, no matter how you slice it. Eventually, how well industry and non-supervisory bodies unite to produce new frameworks for advanced therapies will shape the year 2022 and further. Pacific Northwest talent will continue to contribute to the advancement of gene and cell curatives in both the short and long term, thanks to its deep pool of ground-breaking scientific developers, entrepreneurial directorial leadership, largely skilled translational scientists, and endured bio manufacturing technicians. We may see continued on-life science fund withdrawal from biotech in 2021, but this can be anticipated as a strong comeback in 2022 by biotech industry, backed by deep-pocketed life science investors who are committed to this sector. A similar investment, combined with pharma's cash-heavy coffers, can result in increased junction and acquisition activity, which will be a challenge for some but an occasion for others. Over the last five years, investment interest in Seattle and the Pacific Northwest has grown exponentially, from Vancouver, British Columbia, to Oregon. The region's explosive portfolio of new biotech companies, innovated out of academic centres, demonstrates the region's growing recognition of scientific invention. This created a belief that continued, especially because Seattle's start-ups and biotech enterprises are delivering on their pledge of clinical and patient impact. Talent and staffing will continue to be difficult to find. It's a CEO's market, but many of these funds' return, and are not rising in proportion to the exorbitant prices they're paying to enter deals. This schism has become particularly pronounced in 2021. Hence, everyone in biotech is concerned about reclamation and retention.

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MedTech

5 Biotech Stocks Winning the Coronavirus Race

Article | July 13, 2022

There are quite a few companies that have found ways to grow their business during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. This is especially true for a number of biotechs now working on developing a potential treatment for, or vaccine against, the virus; shares of such companies have largely surged over the past couple of months. Although many of these treatments and vaccines are still have quite a way to go before they're widely available, it's still worth taking some time to look through what's going on in the COVID-19 space right now. Here are five biotech stocks that are leading the way when it comes to addressing COVID-19. Regeneron Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ:REGN) wasn't among the initial wave of companies to announce a potential COVID-19 drug. However, investor excitement quickly sent shares surging when the company announced that its rheumatoid arthritis drug, Kevzara, could help treat COVID-19 patients.

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MedTech

Wisconsin biotech companies could play key roles in long-term economic recovery from COVID-19 pandemic

Article | October 7, 2022

Whether it’s called a modern “Manhattan Project” or a medical moon shot, the concept of long-term economic recovery rests on how confident people are they won’t risk serious illness by venturing forth in public again. Wisconsin stands to be a significant part of such an undertaking, whatever it’s called. The shorter-term debate is well under way over the gradual lifting of COVID-19 emergency rules, such as the now-extended “safer-at-home” order in Wisconsin. At least a dozen states, including regional coalitions on the East and West coasts, are exploring next steps as they seek to balance responses to the virus with calls for reopening the economy, at least, in part. Wisconsin’s ability to shape longer-term responses will come from private and public resources, which range from companies engaged in production of diagnostics.

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MedTech

Data Analytics: A Groundbreaking Technology in Biotech

Article | July 20, 2022

Biotechnology is a vast discipline of biology that employs diverse biological systems to create solutions that can significantly alter the ways in which they operate across various domains. That said, biotechnology is not a new notion. It has existed for millennia, with ancient civilizations using its earliest incarnations to cultivate crops and create alcoholic beverages. Today, the biotechnology industry has developed by leaps and bounds and has amassed a vast quantity of scientific data through study and research. Given the importance of data in the biotechnology business, it is not difficult to understand why biotech companies utilize data analytics. Modern data analytics tools have made it possible for researchers in the biotech industry to build predictive analytics models and gain knowledge about the most efficient approaches to accomplish their desired goals and objectives. Data analytics is increasingly being adopted by biotech businesses to better understand their industry and foresee any problems down the road. How is Data Analytics Revolutionizing Fields in Biotechnology? Today's business and scientific fields greatly benefit from data. Without the analysis of vast information libraries that provide new insights and enable new innovations, no industry can really advance. Being highly reliant on big data analytics, biotech is not an exception in this regard. With the tools and methods that help scientists systematize their findings and speed up their research for better and safer results, data analytics is making deeper inroads into the biotechnology industry. It is emerging as a crucial link between knowledge and information and is extensively being used for purposes other than just examining the information that is already available. The following are a few of the cutting-edge biotechnology applications of data analytics Genomics and Disease Treatment Pharmaceutical Drug Discovery Drug Recycling and Safety Agriculture and Agri-products Environmental Damage Mitigation Data Analytics Possibilities in Biotechnology With data analytics becoming an integral part of how biotech businesses operate, biotechnologists and related stakeholders need to understand its emergence and crucial role. Data analytics has opened new frontiers in the realm of biotechnology. Thanks to developments in data analytics, research and development activities that once took years may now be accomplished in a matter of months. Also, now scientists have access to biological, social, and environmental insights that can be exploited to create more effective and sustainable products. By understanding the importance of data-related tools and techniques applications, biotech companies are aiming to invest in the popularizing technology to stay updated in the fast-paced biotechnology industry.

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Autolus Ltd

Autolus is a private biopharmaceutical company, focused on the development and commercialisation of engineered T-cell immunotherapy products with extreme efficacy in the treatment of life-threatening cancers.

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Quantgene Demonstrates Game-Changing Sequencing Precision in GENES, A Leading Scientific Journal

Quantgene | June 08, 2021

Quantgene, biotechnology, cloud, and AI company located in Santa Monica, CA, and Berlin, Germany, has demonstrated the most exact gene sequencing yet published in the industry, as shown in the February edition of GENES, a major scientific journal in medical genomics. "Precision Genomics is revolutionizing medicine, but it is being hampered by a lack of rapid, accurate, and easily accessible technology," said Jo Bhakdi, CEO of Quantgene. "Today, the protection of human life is dependent on the advancement of precision genomics, and we are excited to open a new chapter in genomic testing and less invasive cancer screening." DEEPGENTM reduced error rates on Illumina NovaSeq platforms hundreds of times by integrating new chemistry with large-scale cloud processing, mathematically enhanced error reduction, and statistically optimized genomic mapping, signaling an innovative approach ahead for cancer testing. Quantgene's latest innovation is a significant step forward in evidence-based healthcare and precision medicine. Quantgene's DEEPGEN technology was thoroughly investigated in its peer-reviewed publication, which included a series of technical validations. According to the publication, the system detects somatic variations in DNA fragments with an accuracy of more than 1 in 1000 fragments, with high repeatability and very low false-positive results. This degree of accuracy has previously only been proven in a peer-reviewed setting for systems that examined a small number of genomic regions. DEEPGEN's technology covers around 70,000 locations and includes a wide range of FDA-approved cancer targets. The results of Quantgene represent a significant advance in the identification of cancer signals in the blood using liquid biopsy and next-generation sequencing technology. Liquid biopsy can be a less invasive and more accurate method of diagnosing different forms of cancer. In oncology, it may also be used to aid physicians in early cancer detection, companion diagnostics, and identifying minimum residual disease. "This is a crucial step forward in precision medicine. Quantgene provides the industry with a more powerful tool to diagnose cancer and other serious diseases earlier than ever before by achieving single-molecule sequencing precision ", said Jo Bhakdi, CEO of Quantgene. About Quantgene Quantgene has emerged as a technical leader in single-molecule precision sequencing over the last six years. To better protect patients from cancer, the company combines deep genomic, cloud, and AI technologies with innovative preventative medicine solutions. Its objective is to increase the healthy human lifespan by ten years within the next ten years.

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New technology allows control of gene therapy doses

Medical Xpress | December 26, 2019

Scientists at Scripps Research in Jupiter have developed a special molecular switch that could be embedded into gene therapies to allow doctors to control dosing. The feat, reported in the scientific journal Nature Biotechnology, offers gene therapy designers what may be the first viable technique for adjusting the activity levels of their therapeutic genes. The lack of such a basic safety feature has helped limit the development of gene therapy, which otherwise holds promise for addressing genetically based conditions. The scientists' technique appears to solve a major safety issue and may lead to more use of the strategy.

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Gene regulation linked to energy production

Medical Xpress | December 23, 2019

Researchers at The University of Western Australia, Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research and Curtin University have made a fundamental discovery about of the regulation of genes in mitochondria, providing a new insight into potential drug targets for diseases that involve energy loss. The research, published today in Science Advances, was led by UWA's Professor Aleksandra Filipovska, Head of Mitochondrial Medicine and Biology, in collaboration with Curtin University's Professor Oliver Rackham, Head of Synthetic Biology and Drug Discovery; and UWA's School of Human Sciences Professor Livia Hool, and their Ph.D. students Danielle Rudler and Laetitia Hughes.

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Research

Quantgene Demonstrates Game-Changing Sequencing Precision in GENES, A Leading Scientific Journal

Quantgene | June 08, 2021

Quantgene, biotechnology, cloud, and AI company located in Santa Monica, CA, and Berlin, Germany, has demonstrated the most exact gene sequencing yet published in the industry, as shown in the February edition of GENES, a major scientific journal in medical genomics. "Precision Genomics is revolutionizing medicine, but it is being hampered by a lack of rapid, accurate, and easily accessible technology," said Jo Bhakdi, CEO of Quantgene. "Today, the protection of human life is dependent on the advancement of precision genomics, and we are excited to open a new chapter in genomic testing and less invasive cancer screening." DEEPGENTM reduced error rates on Illumina NovaSeq platforms hundreds of times by integrating new chemistry with large-scale cloud processing, mathematically enhanced error reduction, and statistically optimized genomic mapping, signaling an innovative approach ahead for cancer testing. Quantgene's latest innovation is a significant step forward in evidence-based healthcare and precision medicine. Quantgene's DEEPGEN technology was thoroughly investigated in its peer-reviewed publication, which included a series of technical validations. According to the publication, the system detects somatic variations in DNA fragments with an accuracy of more than 1 in 1000 fragments, with high repeatability and very low false-positive results. This degree of accuracy has previously only been proven in a peer-reviewed setting for systems that examined a small number of genomic regions. DEEPGEN's technology covers around 70,000 locations and includes a wide range of FDA-approved cancer targets. The results of Quantgene represent a significant advance in the identification of cancer signals in the blood using liquid biopsy and next-generation sequencing technology. Liquid biopsy can be a less invasive and more accurate method of diagnosing different forms of cancer. In oncology, it may also be used to aid physicians in early cancer detection, companion diagnostics, and identifying minimum residual disease. "This is a crucial step forward in precision medicine. Quantgene provides the industry with a more powerful tool to diagnose cancer and other serious diseases earlier than ever before by achieving single-molecule sequencing precision ", said Jo Bhakdi, CEO of Quantgene. About Quantgene Quantgene has emerged as a technical leader in single-molecule precision sequencing over the last six years. To better protect patients from cancer, the company combines deep genomic, cloud, and AI technologies with innovative preventative medicine solutions. Its objective is to increase the healthy human lifespan by ten years within the next ten years.

Read More

New technology allows control of gene therapy doses

Medical Xpress | December 26, 2019

Scientists at Scripps Research in Jupiter have developed a special molecular switch that could be embedded into gene therapies to allow doctors to control dosing. The feat, reported in the scientific journal Nature Biotechnology, offers gene therapy designers what may be the first viable technique for adjusting the activity levels of their therapeutic genes. The lack of such a basic safety feature has helped limit the development of gene therapy, which otherwise holds promise for addressing genetically based conditions. The scientists' technique appears to solve a major safety issue and may lead to more use of the strategy.

Read More

Gene regulation linked to energy production

Medical Xpress | December 23, 2019

Researchers at The University of Western Australia, Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research and Curtin University have made a fundamental discovery about of the regulation of genes in mitochondria, providing a new insight into potential drug targets for diseases that involve energy loss. The research, published today in Science Advances, was led by UWA's Professor Aleksandra Filipovska, Head of Mitochondrial Medicine and Biology, in collaboration with Curtin University's Professor Oliver Rackham, Head of Synthetic Biology and Drug Discovery; and UWA's School of Human Sciences Professor Livia Hool, and their Ph.D. students Danielle Rudler and Laetitia Hughes.

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