CRISPR-CAS9: Programming Your HealthGenetic engineering & the future of healthcare

| June 30, 2019

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Genetic engineering is the deliberate modification, artificial manipulation, and recombination of the genetic material of an organism to change its characteristics. These techniques can be used as a therapy for certain diseases. This whitepaper will dive into the world of genetic engineering and its future applications and possibilities.

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Biognosys AG

We believe that the decoding of the proteome will impact life science more than the genome revolution a decade ago. Biognosys provides innovative services and products for protein discovery and quantification using cutting edge technology. We strive to be the company that provides the best possible solutions to support researchers in their protein analysis needs.

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Top 10 biotech IPOs in 2019

Article | February 24, 2020

The big question at the start of 2019 was whether the IPO window would stay open for biotech companies, particularly those seeking to pull off ever-larger IPOs at increasingly earlier stages of development. The short answer is yes—kind of. Here’s the long answer: In the words of Renaissance Capital, the IPO market had “a mostly good year.” The total number of deals fell to 159 from 192 the year before, but technology and healthcare companies were standout performers. The latter—which include biotech, medtech and diagnostics companies—led the pack, making up 43% of all IPOs in 2019. By Renaissance’s count, seven companies went public at valuations exceeding $1 billion, up from five the year before

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Learning How FoxA2 Helps Turn Stem Cells into Organs

Article | February 24, 2020

Scientists at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania discovered early on in each cell, FoxA2 simultaneously binds to both the chromosomal proteins and the DNA, opening the flood gates for gene activation. The discovery, “Gene network transitions in embryos depend upon interactions between a pioneer transcription factor and core histones,” published in Nature Genetics, helps untangle mysteries of how embryonic stem cells develop into organs, according to the researchers. “Gene network transitions in embryos and other fate-changing contexts involve combinations of transcription factors. A subset of fate-changing transcription factors act as pioneers; they scan and target nucleosomal DNA and initiate cooperative events that can open the local chromatin. However, a gap has remained in understanding how molecular interactions with the nucleosome contribute to the chromatin-opening phenomenon,” write the investigators.

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Translating Pharmacomicrobiomics: Three Actionable Challenges/Prospects in 2020

Article | February 24, 2020

The year 2020 marks a decade since the term pharmacomicrobiomics was coined (Rizkallah et al., 2010) to crystallize a century-old concept of mutual interactions between humans, drugs, and the microbial world. The human microbiome, with its immense metabolic potential that exceeds and expands the human metabolic capacities, has the ability to modulate pharmacotherapy by affecting both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drug molecules:

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Cell Out? Lysate-Based Expression an Option for Personalized Meds

Article | February 24, 2020

Cell-free expression (CFE) is the practice of making a protein without using a living cell. In contrast with cell line-based methods, production is achieved using a fluid containing biological components extracted from a cell, i.e., a lysate. CFE offers potential advantages for biopharma according to Philip Probert, PhD, a senior scientist at the Centre for Process Innovation in the U.K.

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Spotlight

Biognosys AG

We believe that the decoding of the proteome will impact life science more than the genome revolution a decade ago. Biognosys provides innovative services and products for protein discovery and quantification using cutting edge technology. We strive to be the company that provides the best possible solutions to support researchers in their protein analysis needs.

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