Cardio Exercise And Strength Training Affect Hormones Differently

| August 26, 2018

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Every day a lot of people cycle to and from work or visit the gym to lift heavy weights. Regardless of the form of training they choose, almost everyone does it to improve their health. But we actually know surprisingly little about exactly how different forms of training affect our health. However, now researchers from the University of Copenhagen have come closer to understanding the diverse effects of different forms of training. In a new study published in the scientific Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight, the researchers show that cardio training on an exercise bike causes three times as large an increase in the production of the hormone FGF21 than strength training with weights. FGF21 has a lot of positive effects on metabolism.

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Founded in 1922, Ohio Living is the largest and most experienced not-for-profit provider of life plan communities and services in Ohio. With headquarters in Columbus, Ohio Living serves more than 90,000 people annually through its wholly owned subsidiaries Ohio Living Communities, Ohio Living Home Health & Hospice and Ohio Living Foundation.

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Article | February 12, 2020

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Ohio Living

Founded in 1922, Ohio Living is the largest and most experienced not-for-profit provider of life plan communities and services in Ohio. With headquarters in Columbus, Ohio Living serves more than 90,000 people annually through its wholly owned subsidiaries Ohio Living Communities, Ohio Living Home Health & Hospice and Ohio Living Foundation.

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