CAR-T therapy raises difficult question: ‘What is the price of a human life?’

JONATHAN JARRY | November 20, 2019

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Alternative medicine, with its universal boogeymen and safe panaceas, gives us a simplistic (and wrong) view of the world. Medicine, on the other hand, often demands that we make tough choices. Chemotherapy may kill cancer cells but it also kills any rapidly dividing cell, which means hair loss and nausea. A new type of intervention for cancer was approved by Health Canada a year ago and is now being covered by the Quebec public drug plan. The intervention is called CAR-T therapy, and while its scientific ingenuity is marvelous, it has raised the age-old question: what is the price of a human life?

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