Brain study probes molecular origins of anxiety

Scientists have found that increasing the levels of a molecule in a particular part of the brain can reduce anxious temperament in young monkeys. The finding sheds light on the origins of anxiety disorders and how it might be possible to devise early treatments for those at risk.

Spotlight

Xell AG

Xell is an experienced partner for companies in the biotech and pharmaceutical industry providing them with highly-efficient solutions in cell culture technology. Meeting our customers’ specific needs is the objective of our dedicated team – our personal approach to challenging tasks is key to Xell’s success. With years of industry experience, we bring our extensive expertise in ultra-high performance media and feed development, and apply our powerful analytical tools for in-depth characterization of biological systems and pharmaceutical proteins, guaranteeing optimal solutions for our customers’ bioprocesses.

OTHER ARTICLES
MedTech

Next-Gen Genetics Cancer Therapies Creating Investment Prospects

Article | July 11, 2022

Genetic therapeutics such as genetic engineering and gene therapy are increasingly emerging as one of the most influential and transformed biotechnological solutions around the globe in recent times. These genetic solutions are being assessed across various medical domains, including cancer treatment, neurology, oncology, and ophthalmology. Citing the trend, the genetics industry is estimated to experience a tsunami of approvals, with over 1,000 cell and gene therapy clinical trials currently underway and over 900 companies worldwide focusing on these cutting-edge therapies. Growing Cancer Encourages Advancements in Genetic Technologies With the surging cases of cancers such as leukemias, carcinomas, lymphomas, and others, patients worldwide are increasing their spending on adopting novel therapeutic solutions for non-recurring treatment of the disease, such as gene therapy, genetic engineering, T-cell therapy, and gene editing. As per a study by the Fight Cancer Organization, spending on the treatment of cancer increased to $200.7 billion, and the amount is anticipated to exceed $245 billion by the end of 2030. Growing revenue prospects are encouraging biotechnology and biopharmaceutical companies to develop novel genetic solutions for cancer treatment. For instance, Bristol-Myers Squibb K.K., a Japanese pharmaceutical company, introduced a B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA)-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell immunotherapy, Abecma, for the treatment of relapsed or refractory (R/R) multiple myeloma in 2022. Amid a New Market: Genetics Will Attract Massive Investments Despite several developments and technological advancements, genetics is still considered to be in a nascent stage, providing significant prospects for growth to the companies that are already operating in the domain. Genetics solutions such as gene therapies, gene editing, and T-cell immunotherapy are emerging as highly active treatments across various medical fields, resulting in increasing research and development activities across the domain, drawing significant attention from investors. Given the potential of genetic treatments and the focus on finding new ways to treat cancer and other related diseases, it's easy to understand why companies are investing in the domain. For instance, Pfizer has recently announced an investment of around $800 million to construct development facilities supporting gene therapy manufacturing from initial preclinical research through final commercial-scale production. Due to these advancements, cell and gene therapies are forecast to grow from $4 billion annually to more than $45 billion, exhibiting growth at a 63% CAGR. The Future of Genetics Though there is a significant rise in advancement in genetic technologies and developments, the number of approved genetic treatments remains extremely small. However, with gene transfer and CRISPR solutions emerging as new modalities for cancer treatment, the start-up companies will attract a growing amount and proportion of private and public investments. This is expected present a tremendous opportunity for biopharma and biotechnology investors to help fund and benefit from the medical industry's shift from traditional treatments to cutting-edge genetic therapeutics in the coming years.

Read More
MedTech

5 Biotech Stocks Winning the Coronavirus Race

Article | October 7, 2022

There are quite a few companies that have found ways to grow their business during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. This is especially true for a number of biotechs now working on developing a potential treatment for, or vaccine against, the virus; shares of such companies have largely surged over the past couple of months. Although many of these treatments and vaccines are still have quite a way to go before they're widely available, it's still worth taking some time to look through what's going on in the COVID-19 space right now. Here are five biotech stocks that are leading the way when it comes to addressing COVID-19. Regeneron Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ:REGN) wasn't among the initial wave of companies to announce a potential COVID-19 drug. However, investor excitement quickly sent shares surging when the company announced that its rheumatoid arthritis drug, Kevzara, could help treat COVID-19 patients.

Read More
MedTech

AI and Biotechnology: The Future of Healthcare Industry

Article | July 20, 2022

Artificial intelligence has grasped the foundation in biotech. It can have the most innovative impact on biotechnology. AI has already established its presence in our day-to-day life. AI has made the existence of self-driving cars possible. Likewise, the benefits and quality that it can contribute to biotech can also be felt. With AI, bio technicians will be able to enhance virtual screening, overlook preliminary datasets from clinics, and decipher an enormous amount of information. It can also help in improving the medication process by gathering and analyzing every bit of information. The Significance of AI in Biotechnology In the past few years, the application of artificial intelligence in the biotechnology industry has shifted from being sci-fi to sci-fact. A vast number of biotech companies like Deep Genomics are adopting AI for making data-driven decisions and use analytics tools to work efficiently. Unlike the AI robots in sci-fi that are ready to take over the world. AI designed for biotech has been designed to solve certain problems or complete a bunch of tasks by using automated algorithms. The aim of AI technology for biotech is to collect insights along with hidden patterns from large amounts of data. All the different industries of biotech including agriculture, animal, medical, industrial, and bioinformatics are gradually being affected by artificial intelligence. Moreover, the biotech industry is realizing that AI enables them some of the important strength to their business, including: Expanding accessibility Cost-effectiveness Critical predictions Efficient decision-making Research centers like PwC have also estimated output of $15.7 trillion by 2030 solely with AI contribution in industries. A survey revealed that about 44% of life science experts are using AI for R&D activities, as well. Use of AI in Biotechnology Altering Biomedical and Clinical Data So far the most developed use of AI is its ability to read voluminous data records and interpret them. It can prove to be a life-save for bio technicians who would have to examine that much data from research publications by themselves for the validation of their hypothesis. With the help of AI, clinical studies of patients will also become easier as all the examination reports and prescriptions will be stored in one place for cross-reference. Furthermore, it will also help in blending and fetching data into usable formats for analysis. Test Result Prediction Through trial and error, AI along with machine learning can help in predicting the response of the patient to certain drugs to provide more effective outcomes. Drug Design & Discovery AI plays a vital role whether it’s designing a new molecule or identifying new biological targets. It helps in identifying and validating drugs. It reduces the cost and time spent on the entire drug trial process and reaches the market. Personalized Medications for Rare Diseases With the combination of body scan results, patients’ body and analytics, AI can also help in detecting dangerous diseases at an early stage. Improving Process of Manufacturing To improve the process of manufacturing in biotechnology, AI offers a wide range of opportunities. It controls quality, reduces wastage, improves useability, and minimizes the designing time. Moving Towards AI-Enhanced Biotech Future Ever since the concept of artificial intelligence has arrived, being curious by nature, humans have started working towards achieving this goal. It has been growing at a fast pace while showing unbelievable growth and achievements at times. In comparison to the traditional methods used in the biotechnology industry, AI-based methods seem more reliable and accurate. In the upcoming years, it will show its success by improving the quality of health people have. You can also develop your AI-based application or know more about it by taking IT consultations.

Read More

2 Small-Cap Biotech Stocks You Haven't Heard of, But Should Know About

Article | April 17, 2020

With everything that's going on with the COVID-19 pandemic, many healthcare companies have grabbed plenty of spotlight during these challenging times. At the same time, a number of otherwise promising businesses have slipped under the radar. That's especially true for small-cap biotech stocks that aren't actively involved in developing tests, vaccines or treatments for COVID-19. Vaccine developers, protective equipment producers, and healthcare service providers are all attracting plenty of attention during this pandemic, but there are just as many promising biotech stocks that aren't involved in these areas. Here are two such companies that you might have missed, but they deserve a spot on your watch list.

Read More

Spotlight

Xell AG

Xell is an experienced partner for companies in the biotech and pharmaceutical industry providing them with highly-efficient solutions in cell culture technology. Meeting our customers’ specific needs is the objective of our dedicated team – our personal approach to challenging tasks is key to Xell’s success. With years of industry experience, we bring our extensive expertise in ultra-high performance media and feed development, and apply our powerful analytical tools for in-depth characterization of biological systems and pharmaceutical proteins, guaranteeing optimal solutions for our customers’ bioprocesses.

Related News

Newly-discovered protein could play key role in fighting obesity

Drug Target Review | November 21, 2019

Scientists at Scripps Research, US have opened the door to critical new understandings about obesity and metabolism with an unexpected finding about a protein that is highly expressed in fat tissue. This discovery, the scientists say, could lead to new approaches for addressing obesity and potentially many other diseases. The signalling protein known as progesterone receptor membrane component 2 (PGRMC2) had previously been detected in the uterus, liver and several areas of the body. But the lab of Enrique Saez, PhD, saw that it was most abundant in fat tissue, particularly in brown fat, which turns food into heat to maintain body temperature. The team built on their discovery, finding that PGRMC2 binds to and releases an essential molecule called heme, which travels within cells to enable crucial life processes such as cellular respiration, cell proliferation, cell death and circadian rhythms. Saez and his team found that PGRMC2 is a ‘chaperone’ of heme, encapsulating the molecule and transporting it from the cell’s mitochondria, where heme is created, to the nucleus, where it helps carry out important functions. Without a protective chaperone, heme would react with and destroy everything in its path.

Read More

AI Algorithm To Speed Up Drug Molecule Design

Technology Networks | November 20, 2019

Artificial Intelligence can be used to predict molecular wave functions and the electronic properties of molecules. This innovative AI method developed by a team of researchers at the University of Warwick, the Technical University of Berlin and the University of Luxembourg, could be used to speed-up the design of drug molecules or new materials. Artificial Intelligence and machine learning algorithms are routinely used to predict our purchasing behaviour and to recognise our faces or handwriting. In scientific research, Artificial Intelligence is establishing itself as a crucial tool for scientific discovery. In Chemistry AI has become instrumental in predicting the outcomes of experiments or simulations of quantum systems. To achieve this, AI needs to be able to systematically incorporate the fundamental laws of physics. An interdisciplinary team of chemists, physicists, and computer scientists led by the University of Warwick, and including the Technical University of Berlin, and the University of Luxembourg have developed a deep machine learning algorithm that can predict the quantum states of molecules, so-called wave functions, which determine all properties of molecules.

Read More

Regeneration mechanism could provide target for liver disease drugs

Drug Target Review | November 06, 2019

A newly-discovered molecular mechanism that allows damaged adult liver cells to regenerate could pave the way for drugs for chronic liver diseases. A molecular mechanism that allows damaged adult liver cells to regenerate has been discovered and could pave the way for drugs to treat conditions such as cirrhosis or other chronic liver diseases where regeneration is impaired. The researchers used mice and liver organoids (‘mini-livers’ generated in the lab from mouse liver cells) to study adult liver regeneration. They discovered that a molecule called TET1 is produced in healthy adult liver cells during the first steps of regeneration, and that this process is mimicked in liver organoids, where it has a role in stimulating organoid growth. “We now understand how adult liver cells respond to the changes caused by tissue injury,” said Dr Luigi Aloia, first author of the paper and postdoctoral researcher at the Gurdon Institute “This paves the way for exciting future work to boost cell regeneration in chronic liver disease, or in other organs where regeneration is minimal such as the brain or pancreas.”

Read More

Newly-discovered protein could play key role in fighting obesity

Drug Target Review | November 21, 2019

Scientists at Scripps Research, US have opened the door to critical new understandings about obesity and metabolism with an unexpected finding about a protein that is highly expressed in fat tissue. This discovery, the scientists say, could lead to new approaches for addressing obesity and potentially many other diseases. The signalling protein known as progesterone receptor membrane component 2 (PGRMC2) had previously been detected in the uterus, liver and several areas of the body. But the lab of Enrique Saez, PhD, saw that it was most abundant in fat tissue, particularly in brown fat, which turns food into heat to maintain body temperature. The team built on their discovery, finding that PGRMC2 binds to and releases an essential molecule called heme, which travels within cells to enable crucial life processes such as cellular respiration, cell proliferation, cell death and circadian rhythms. Saez and his team found that PGRMC2 is a ‘chaperone’ of heme, encapsulating the molecule and transporting it from the cell’s mitochondria, where heme is created, to the nucleus, where it helps carry out important functions. Without a protective chaperone, heme would react with and destroy everything in its path.

Read More

AI Algorithm To Speed Up Drug Molecule Design

Technology Networks | November 20, 2019

Artificial Intelligence can be used to predict molecular wave functions and the electronic properties of molecules. This innovative AI method developed by a team of researchers at the University of Warwick, the Technical University of Berlin and the University of Luxembourg, could be used to speed-up the design of drug molecules or new materials. Artificial Intelligence and machine learning algorithms are routinely used to predict our purchasing behaviour and to recognise our faces or handwriting. In scientific research, Artificial Intelligence is establishing itself as a crucial tool for scientific discovery. In Chemistry AI has become instrumental in predicting the outcomes of experiments or simulations of quantum systems. To achieve this, AI needs to be able to systematically incorporate the fundamental laws of physics. An interdisciplinary team of chemists, physicists, and computer scientists led by the University of Warwick, and including the Technical University of Berlin, and the University of Luxembourg have developed a deep machine learning algorithm that can predict the quantum states of molecules, so-called wave functions, which determine all properties of molecules.

Read More

Regeneration mechanism could provide target for liver disease drugs

Drug Target Review | November 06, 2019

A newly-discovered molecular mechanism that allows damaged adult liver cells to regenerate could pave the way for drugs for chronic liver diseases. A molecular mechanism that allows damaged adult liver cells to regenerate has been discovered and could pave the way for drugs to treat conditions such as cirrhosis or other chronic liver diseases where regeneration is impaired. The researchers used mice and liver organoids (‘mini-livers’ generated in the lab from mouse liver cells) to study adult liver regeneration. They discovered that a molecule called TET1 is produced in healthy adult liver cells during the first steps of regeneration, and that this process is mimicked in liver organoids, where it has a role in stimulating organoid growth. “We now understand how adult liver cells respond to the changes caused by tissue injury,” said Dr Luigi Aloia, first author of the paper and postdoctoral researcher at the Gurdon Institute “This paves the way for exciting future work to boost cell regeneration in chronic liver disease, or in other organs where regeneration is minimal such as the brain or pancreas.”

Read More

Events