Biotechnology: Longer Life Spans Will Open Up Vast New Markets

| July 25, 2017 | Sponsored

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Biotech has also made leaps and bounds within agriculture as well, hinting at the engineering of indestructible crops that will withstand extreme weather conditions and killer fungi and will provide for a population of up to nine billion people. As biotech innovations and simple lifestyle hacking begin routinely extending our lifespans into the eighties and nineties, as most children born into wealthy, technologically advanced societies today look forward to a century of active life, the implications for markets, politics, and culture spin out in fractal complexity.

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LeanTaaS

LeanTaaS is a software company that uses lean principles, machine learning, and predictive analytics to digitally transform core operational processes in healthcare. This transformation increases patient access, decreases wait times, improves staff satisfaction, reduces healthcare delivery costs, and improves operational performance. LeanTaaS's cloud-based iQueue platform mathematically matches the demand for expensive, constrained healthcare resources – operating rooms, infusion chairs, imaging assets, inpatient beds, etc.

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2 Small-Cap Biotech Stocks You Haven't Heard of, But Should Know About

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With everything that's going on with the COVID-19 pandemic, many healthcare companies have grabbed plenty of spotlight during these challenging times. At the same time, a number of otherwise promising businesses have slipped under the radar. That's especially true for small-cap biotech stocks that aren't actively involved in developing tests, vaccines or treatments for COVID-19. Vaccine developers, protective equipment producers, and healthcare service providers are all attracting plenty of attention during this pandemic, but there are just as many promising biotech stocks that aren't involved in these areas. Here are two such companies that you might have missed, but they deserve a spot on your watch list.

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Learning How FoxA2 Helps Turn Stem Cells into Organs

Article | April 17, 2020

Scientists at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania discovered early on in each cell, FoxA2 simultaneously binds to both the chromosomal proteins and the DNA, opening the flood gates for gene activation. The discovery, “Gene network transitions in embryos depend upon interactions between a pioneer transcription factor and core histones,” published in Nature Genetics, helps untangle mysteries of how embryonic stem cells develop into organs, according to the researchers. “Gene network transitions in embryos and other fate-changing contexts involve combinations of transcription factors. A subset of fate-changing transcription factors act as pioneers; they scan and target nucleosomal DNA and initiate cooperative events that can open the local chromatin. However, a gap has remained in understanding how molecular interactions with the nucleosome contribute to the chromatin-opening phenomenon,” write the investigators.

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Article | April 17, 2020

Whether it’s called a modern “Manhattan Project” or a medical moon shot, the concept of long-term economic recovery rests on how confident people are they won’t risk serious illness by venturing forth in public again. Wisconsin stands to be a significant part of such an undertaking, whatever it’s called. The shorter-term debate is well under way over the gradual lifting of COVID-19 emergency rules, such as the now-extended “safer-at-home” order in Wisconsin. At least a dozen states, including regional coalitions on the East and West coasts, are exploring next steps as they seek to balance responses to the virus with calls for reopening the economy, at least, in part. Wisconsin’s ability to shape longer-term responses will come from private and public resources, which range from companies engaged in production of diagnostics.

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Defense biotech research looks to eliminate bacteria causing traveler’s diarrhea, reduce jet lag duration

Article | April 17, 2020

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Spotlight

LeanTaaS

LeanTaaS is a software company that uses lean principles, machine learning, and predictive analytics to digitally transform core operational processes in healthcare. This transformation increases patient access, decreases wait times, improves staff satisfaction, reduces healthcare delivery costs, and improves operational performance. LeanTaaS's cloud-based iQueue platform mathematically matches the demand for expensive, constrained healthcare resources – operating rooms, infusion chairs, imaging assets, inpatient beds, etc.

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