Biotech Company Creates Auto Luminescent Plants

| January 10, 2014

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Glowing animals and plants seem to be all the rage these days. A biotechnology company based out of St. Louis recently unveiled a commercially available plant that is entirely auto luminescent.

Spotlight

Reaction Biology Corporation

Reaction Biology Corp. (“RBC”) is a premier service provider for drug profiling, screening and early-stage drug discovery collaborations. Its proprietary HotSpot technology is an innovative platform for screening/profiling small molecules vs biological target assayable by radioisotope detection. For kinase and transferase enzymes in particular, such assays are the “gold standard”. RBC screens and profiles vs all major classes of epigenetic transferases via the radioisotope approach—HMTs, DNMTs, HATs, and also over 600 kinases. HotSpot assay substrates require no special modifications (e.g. biotin, fluorophors or other tags). Hence biologically relevant substrates may be used, including full nucleosomes, histone proteins or peptides. Since detection does not rely on antibodies, coupling enzymes or fluorescence, major causes of false positives, false negatives and compound interference are eliminated.

OTHER ARTICLES

Closing bacterial genomes from the human gut microbiome using long-read sequencing

Article | February 12, 2020

In our lab, we focus on the impact of the gut microbiome on human health and disease. To evaluate this relationship, it’s important to understand the particular functions that different bacteria have. As bacteria are able to exchange, duplicate, and rearrange their genes in ways that directly affect their phenotypes, complete bacterial genomes assembled directly from human samples are essential to understand the strain variation and potential functions of the bacteria we host. Advances in the microbiome space have allowed for the de novo assembly of microbial genomes directly from metagenomes via short-read sequencing, assembly of reads into contigs, and binning of contigs into putative genome drafts. This is advantageous because it allows us to discover microbes without culturing them, directly from human samples and without reference databases. In the past year, there have been a number of tour de force efforts to broadly characterize the human gut microbiota through the creation of such metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs)[1–4]. These works have produced hundreds of thousands of microbial genomes that vastly increase our understanding of the human gut. However, challenges in the assembly of short reads has limited our ability to correctly assemble repeated genomic elements and place them into genomic context. Thus, existing MAGs are often fragmented and do not include mobile genetic elements, 16S rRNA sequences, and other elements that are repeated or have high identity within and across bacterial genomes.

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Cell Out? Lysate-Based Expression an Option for Personalized Meds

Article | February 18, 2020

Cell-free expression (CFE) is the practice of making a protein without using a living cell. In contrast with cell line-based methods, production is achieved using a fluid containing biological components extracted from a cell, i.e., a lysate. CFE offers potential advantages for biopharma according to Philip Probert, PhD, a senior scientist at the Centre for Process Innovation in the U.K.

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Pfizer, BioNTech Plan Clinical Trial for COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine Candidate

Article | April 9, 2020

Pfizer and BioNTech plan to begin human clinical trials on their lead COVID-19 therapeutic candidate, an mRNA vaccine, by the end of this month, the companies said today, through a collaboration that could generate up to $748 million for the German biotech. The companies announced plans last month to partner on BNT162, the first treatment to emerge from BioNTech’s accelerated COVID-19-focused development program, “Project Lightspeed.” BioNTech and Pfizer established collaboration intended to draw upon BioNTech’s proprietary mRNA vaccine platforms, and Pfizer’s expertise in vaccine research and development, regulatory capabilities, and global manufacturing and distribution network.

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Selexis Cell Line Development Strategies

Article | February 11, 2020

In today’s biotechnology landscape, to be competitive, meet regulations, and achieve market demands, “we must apply Bioprocessing 4.0,” said Igor Fisch, PhD, CEO, Selexis. In fact, in the last decade, “Selexis has evolved from cloning by limiting dilution to automated cell selection to nanofluidic chips and from monoclonality assessment by statistical calculation to proprietary bioinformatic analysis,” he added. Single-use processing systems are an expanding part of the biomanufacturing world; as such, they are a major component of Bioprocessing 4.0. “At Selexis, we use single use throughout our cell line development workflow. Currently, we have incorporated single-use automated bioprocessing systems such as ambr® and the Beacon® optofluidic platform for accelerated cell line development. By using these systems and optimizing our parameters, we were able to achieve high titers in shake flasks. Additionally, the Beacon systems integrate miniaturized cell culture with high-throughput liquid handling automation and cell imaging. This allows us to control, adjust, and monitor programs at the same time,” noted Fisch.

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Spotlight

Reaction Biology Corporation

Reaction Biology Corp. (“RBC”) is a premier service provider for drug profiling, screening and early-stage drug discovery collaborations. Its proprietary HotSpot technology is an innovative platform for screening/profiling small molecules vs biological target assayable by radioisotope detection. For kinase and transferase enzymes in particular, such assays are the “gold standard”. RBC screens and profiles vs all major classes of epigenetic transferases via the radioisotope approach—HMTs, DNMTs, HATs, and also over 600 kinases. HotSpot assay substrates require no special modifications (e.g. biotin, fluorophors or other tags). Hence biologically relevant substrates may be used, including full nucleosomes, histone proteins or peptides. Since detection does not rely on antibodies, coupling enzymes or fluorescence, major causes of false positives, false negatives and compound interference are eliminated.

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