Bio Databases 2019: Immunology

TODD SMITH | January 23, 2019

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I always look forward to the Nucleic Acids Research (NAR) database issue. It's a great way to learn what people are interested in and learn something new. Its also fun to count the number of databases, because each way they're counted, a different answer is obtained. As in 2016, in 2018 the number of databases listed by NAR decreased. This is in part due to the overall trend that the number of new databases being submitted to the archive each year since 2004, has been slowly decreasing. It is also due to an increase in the number of databases being removed from the archive. Both issues are discussed at the end of this blog.

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Alector

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