A new blood test may detect sleep deprivation

| September 25, 2018

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Lack of sleep is just as dangerous as excessive drinking when it comes to activities such as driving. The breathalyzer can reliably measure a person's state of intoxication, but there's currently no way of assessing someone's tiredness. New research may soon change that, however. Last year, Medical News Today reported on a study that explained that sleep deprivation has the same negative effect on our brains as heavy drinking.

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SYNTHELIS

Synthelis provides a solution to a well known challenge in terms of biotechnological production – namely the synthesized production of membrane proteins. Around 30% of the human genome is coded for protein membranes. This family of proteins is involved in key biological processes such as cellular signaling, energy transduction or metabolic transportation. Anomalies affecting their structure or function can be directly or indirectly linked to a large number of pathologies. Consequently these molecules are the target for a large number of medicines currently planned for development.

OTHER ARTICLES

Learning How FoxA2 Helps Turn Stem Cells into Organs

Article | March 18, 2020

Scientists at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania discovered early on in each cell, FoxA2 simultaneously binds to both the chromosomal proteins and the DNA, opening the flood gates for gene activation. The discovery, “Gene network transitions in embryos depend upon interactions between a pioneer transcription factor and core histones,” published in Nature Genetics, helps untangle mysteries of how embryonic stem cells develop into organs, according to the researchers. “Gene network transitions in embryos and other fate-changing contexts involve combinations of transcription factors. A subset of fate-changing transcription factors act as pioneers; they scan and target nucleosomal DNA and initiate cooperative events that can open the local chromatin. However, a gap has remained in understanding how molecular interactions with the nucleosome contribute to the chromatin-opening phenomenon,” write the investigators.

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Defense biotech research looks to eliminate bacteria causing traveler’s diarrhea, reduce jet lag duration

Article | April 9, 2020

World traveler‘s will rejoice at the idea of a seemingly magical device that would guarantee they never suffer from the all-too-familiar stomach issues that come from traveling internationally while reducing jet lag at the same time. But it’s not just privileged globetrotters that would benefit from a device that eliminates the bacteria associated with the so-called Montezuma’s Revenge. In 2016, more than 230,000 children around the world died from some of the same types of bacteria as those that cause traveler’s diarrhea, and the bacteria mainly come from unsafe “drinking water, poor sanitation and malnutrition,” according to Oxford University’s Our World In Data portal. On Monday, DARPA announced it was researching an “implantable or ingestible bioelectronic carrier” that would eliminate the five major bacteria associated with traveler’s diarrhea.

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5 Biotech Stocks Winning the Coronavirus Race

Article | April 13, 2020

There are quite a few companies that have found ways to grow their business during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. This is especially true for a number of biotechs now working on developing a potential treatment for, or vaccine against, the virus; shares of such companies have largely surged over the past couple of months. Although many of these treatments and vaccines are still have quite a way to go before they're widely available, it's still worth taking some time to look through what's going on in the COVID-19 space right now. Here are five biotech stocks that are leading the way when it comes to addressing COVID-19. Regeneron Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ:REGN) wasn't among the initial wave of companies to announce a potential COVID-19 drug. However, investor excitement quickly sent shares surging when the company announced that its rheumatoid arthritis drug, Kevzara, could help treat COVID-19 patients.

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Ruminating on Bioprocessing 4.0

Article | February 18, 2020

The Bioprocessing 4.0 concept seeks to apply automation and technology to the digital transformation of biologics manufacturing. As the paradigm moves forward, it faces barriers to its adoption, according to Eric Langer, president of BioPlan Associates. “Perhaps the greatest challenges involve unsecured links and adapting the applications to areas where automation is critically needed today,” says Langer. “Unresolved security issues could seriously affect a company’s data in a regulated environment, so they will need to have iron-clad anti-hacking protection in place. Unfortunately, cyber security is not yet a top focus for the industry.”

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Spotlight

SYNTHELIS

Synthelis provides a solution to a well known challenge in terms of biotechnological production – namely the synthesized production of membrane proteins. Around 30% of the human genome is coded for protein membranes. This family of proteins is involved in key biological processes such as cellular signaling, energy transduction or metabolic transportation. Anomalies affecting their structure or function can be directly or indirectly linked to a large number of pathologies. Consequently these molecules are the target for a large number of medicines currently planned for development.

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