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    NEWLY DISCOVERED BIOSYNTHETIC PATHWAY IN BACTERIA RECIPE FOR DRUG DISCOVERY AND PRODUCTION

    Jul 19, 2019

    Microbes are master chefs of the biomolecular world; collectively, they harbor the ability to produce a vast array of unknown substances, some of which may have therapeutic or other useful properties. In searching for useful products, a team of chemists at Illinois have discovered a whole new class ...

    PHYS.ORG
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    SCIENTISTS DISCOVER GROUP OF GENES CONNECTED TO LONGER LIFE IN FRUIT FLIES

    Jul 19, 2019

    Alexey Moskalev, Ph.D., Head of the Laboratory of Geroprotective and Radioprotective technologies and co-authors from the Institute of biology of Komi Science Center of RAS, the Engelgard's Institute of molecular biology of RAS and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology published an article ...

    PHYS.ORG
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    LOOKING FOR OFEV FOLLOW-UP, BOEHRINGER PICKS UP BRIDGE BIOTHERAPEUTICS' IPF MED FOR $50M

    Jul 19, 2019

    Nearly five years after lung-scarring med Ofev got the FDA nod, its maker wants to get cracking on a  successor. Boehringer Ingelheim is licensing an autotaxin inhibitor from Bridge Biotherapeutics for €45 million ($50 million) upfront. Seongnam, South Korea-based Bridge Biotherapeutics is...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    TORNADOES, WINDSTORMS PAVE WAY FOR LASTING PLANT INVASIONS

    Jul 18, 2019

    When tornadoes touch down, we brace for news of property damage, injuries, and loss of life, but the high-speed wind storms wreak environmental havoc, too. They can cut through massive swaths of forest, destroying trees and wildlife habitat, and opening up opportunities for invasive species to gain ...


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    NEW SPECIES OF FLYING SQUIRREL FROM SOUTHWEST CHINA ADDED TO THE RAREST AND MOST WANTED

    Jul 18, 2019

    Described in 1981, the genus Biswamoyopterus is regarded as the most mysterious and rarest amongst all flying squirrels. It comprises two large 1.4-1.8 kg species endemic to southern Asia  the Namdapha flying squirrel (India) and the Laotian giant flying squirrel (Lao PDR). Each is only known f...


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    THE LOSS OF BIODIVERSITY COMES AT A PRICE

    Jul 17, 2019

    Almost 300,000 Euros is what the Donana fire cost in terms of biodiversity, according to an estimate done by a University of Cordoba research group. The fire occurred in 2017 and destroyed about 8,500 hectares, most of which were part of Doñana National Park, home to a number of emblematic sp...


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    LITTLE GENES, BIG CONSERVATION: SCIENTISTS STUDY GENETIC RESCUE

    Jul 17, 2019

    At first glance, there arent many similarities between westslope cutthroat trout in Montana, wolves on Isle Royale National Park in Michigan and Australias mountain pygmy possum, a mouse-sized alpine marsupial. With all three, though, managers have attempted or explored the possibility of genetic re...


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    NEW INSIGHT INTO MICRORNA FUNCTION CAN GIVE GENE THERAPY A BOOST

    Jul 17, 2019

    Scientists at the University of Eastern Finland and the Universitya of Oxford have shown that small RNA molecules occurring naturally in cells, i.e. microRNAs, are also abundant in cell nuclei. Previously, microRNAs were mainly thought to be found in cytoplasm. The scientists also discovered that mi...


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    SOSEI HEPTARES PENS 1B DOLLARS BIOBUCKS GPCR PACT WITH GENENTECH

    Jul 16, 2019

    After spinning out two companies at the start of the year, Sosei Heptares has now inked a new deal with Roche biologics unit Genentech. The headline $1 billion biobucks is, as ever, heavily backloaded, with the upfront a mere $26 million. Under the deal, the pair will seek to work on new meds that m...


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    TREFOIL THERAPEUTICS BANKS 28M DOLLARS TO CREATE FIRST DRUG FOR GENETIC EYE DISORDER

    Jul 16, 2019

    Right now, the only way to prevent blindness in patients with a group of genetic eye disorders called corneal dystrophies is with cornea transplant surgery. But Trefoil Therapeutics is looking to change that: It's raised $28 million to push its regenerative treatment toward the clinic. Trefoil&r...


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    NOTABLE LABS LANDS 40M DOLLARS TO EXPAND AI-BASED CANCER TREATMENT TECH

    Jul 16, 2019

    Since it raised its 10 million dollars debut round in 2017, Notable Labs has been busy building its artificial-intelligence-based technology that predicts which types of patients are most likely to respond to a drug. Now, the startup is adding $40 million (PDF) to its reserves as it scales up its ca...


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    GENMAB PARTNERS ON CANCER ANTIBODIES WITH BLINK BIOMEDICAL, LAUNCHES 503M DOLLARS U.S. IPO

    Jul 15, 2019

    Genmab wrapped up an eventful week on Friday as the Danish biotech launched an up to 200 million dollars-per-product cancer therapy collaboration with BliNK Biomedical, and raised 503 million dollars through an American initial public offering (IPO). Genmab has signed an exclusive commercial license...


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    ENZYME ASSOCIATED WITH DETOXIFICATION LINKED TO OBESITY AND FATTY LIVER DISEASE

    Jul 15, 2019

    Scientists from Clemson Universitys environmental toxicology program have connected an enzyme associated with detoxification to obesity and fatty liver disease, especially in males. William Baldwin, PhD, professor and graduate program coordinator in the College of Sciences department of biological s...


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    HIV CONTROLLER T CELLS SHARE ENERGY OMNIVORE SECRETS

    Jul 15, 2019

    HIV controllers, the rare individuals who can control HIV naturally, have a secret or rather their killer T cells do. These cells are energy omnivores. That is, they are not heavily dependent on glucose, like the killer T cells from noncontrollers. They may draw on varied metabolic resources. This f...


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    WEAK DATA SPUR AMGEN, NOVARTIS TO CAN PIVOTAL ALZHEIMER'S TEST

    Jul 12, 2019

    Amgen and Novartis have stopped pivotal tests of CNP520 in Alzheimer’s disease after an interim review found patients on the BACE inhibitor worsened on some measures of cognitive function. The failure is a blow to the hypothesis that anti-amyloid drugs delay or prevent the onset of Alzheimer&r...


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    SOFINNOVA INVESTS IN ABIVAX TO DELAY CASH CRUNCH

    Jul 12, 2019

    Sofinnova Partners has invested 12 million Euros 14 million dollars in Abivax, securing itself more than 10% of the company. The investment extends Abivax’s cash runway out to the middle of 2020, buying the biotech time to fund ABX464 to milestones while seeking a partner for the asset. Abivax...


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    DDT CONTAMINANTS IN MARINE MAMMALS MAY THREATEN CALIFORNIA CONDOR RECOVERY

    Jul 12, 2019

    The California condor's dramatic recovery from near-extinction was aided by removal of toxic substances from the land, which accumulated in animals whose carrion they ate. But that recovery may be threatened in coastal condors by DDT-related contaminants in marine mammals, according to a prelimi...


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    GENE IDENTIFIED THAT WILL HELP DEVELOP PLANTS TO FIGHT CLIMATE CHANGE

    Jul 11, 2019

    Hidden underground networks of plant roots snake through the earth foraging for nutrients and water, similar to a worm searching for food. Yet, the genetic and molecular mechanisms that govern which parts of the soil roots explore remain largely unknown. Now, Salk Institute researchers have discover...


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    SCIENTISTS DISCOVER A NOVEL PERCEPTION MECHANISM REGULATING IMPORTANT PLANT PROCESSES

    Jul 11, 2019

    An international research team has revealed a novel mechanism for the perception of endogenous peptides by a plant receptor. The discovery of this activation mechanism sets a new paradigm for how plants react to internal and external cues. The study "Mechanisms of RALF peptide perception by a h...


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    SUCCESSFUL T CELL ENGINEERING WITH GENE SCISSORS

    Jul 11, 2019

    The idea of genetically modifying a patients own immune cells and deploying them against infections and tumors has been around since the 1980s. But to this day modified T cells are still not as effective as natural T cells and have been only been of limited clinical value. Using the new CRISPR-Cas9 ...


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    SINGLE CELL GENOTYPING IN CRISPR-CAS TRANSFECTED NEURONS

    Jul 10, 2019

    As powerful as genome editing using CRISPR-Cas is, there are limitations to the technology. One of those has been the ability to determine genotypes of individual CRISPR-Cas transfected cells. Now, a research group from the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience (MPFI) has developed a strateg...


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    AFTER EXITING TROUBLED MERRIMACK, FORMER CEO BECOMES NEW CHIEF AT YUMANITY

    Jul 10, 2019

    Last month, he was the chief executive of struggling Merrimack Pharmaceuticals; today, he’s the new CEO at Fierce 15 winner and early-stage biotech Yumanity as Sanofi-Genzyme veteran Richard Peters looks to move on. His former company, which he joined back in 2017, has been battling against tu...


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    FDA ACCEPTS BLA FILING FOR SANOFI'S RIVAL TO J&J'S DARZALEX

    Jul 10, 2019

    The FDA has accepted Sanofis filing for approval of its Darzalex rival in relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Sanofi will learn whether the FDA will approve anti-CD38 antibody isatuximab by the end of April 2020. Isatuximab impressed at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's (ASCO's) ...


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    SELF-DESTRUCTING CANCER STUDY STOPS CHAIN REACTION OF TUMOR GROWTH

    Jul 09, 2019

    Scientists are constantly exploring new ways to halt cancer in its tracks and make it harder for it to grow, adapt and spread. A new study out of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania reveals that stopping one protein from functioning can cause some cancer cells to die fr...


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    NEW COMPUTATIONAL TOOL LETS RESEARCHERS IDENTIFY CELLS BASED ON THEIR CHROMOSOME SHAPE

    Jul 09, 2019

    In the nucleus of every living cell, long strands of DNA are tightly folded into compact chromosomes. Now, thanks to a new computational approach developed at the Salk Institute, researchers can use the architecture of these chromosome folds to differentiate between types of cells. The information a...


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    LINKING PHENOTYPES TO GENOTYPES: A NEWLY DEVISED GENE-EDITING STRATEGY

    Jul 09, 2019

    The power and convenience of modern-day word-processing programs like Microsoft Word have revolutionized our daily tasks. Need to create a quick resume for a new job opportunity? Procrastinating on that final term paper due tomorrow? Even creating a quick grocery list: Most of us rely on word-proces...


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    CATALYSTS RIVAL TO NOVOSEVEN HITS THE MARK IN PHASE 2 HAEMOPHILIA TRIAL

    Jul 08, 2019

    Catalyst Biosciences is a step closer to challenging Novo Nordisk’s NovoSeven in the haemophilia A and B market after reporting positive results in a phase 2 trial. The US biotech’s marzeptacog alfa (MarzAA) met the primary endpoint of significantly reducing the annualized bleeding rate ...


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    UK BIOTECH PHOREMOST TO WORK WITH INDIA’S CCBT ON NEW DRUG TARGETS

    Jul 08, 2019

    UK-based biotech PhoreMost has begun a collaboration with Indias Centre for Chemical Biology (CCBT) and Therapeutics, focused on novel target sights for new drugs. Part of the Institute for Stem Cell Science and Regenerative Medicine (inStem) CCBT is funded by the Department of Biotechnology, part o...


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    REPORT CALLS FOR EUROPEAN FUNDING REFORM FOR GENE THERAPIES

    Jul 08, 2019

    New payment models, dedicated investment, and better health technology assessment are among a raft of changes needed to bring regenerative medicines to patients in Europe, according to a new report. The Alliance for Regenerative Medicine (ARM), an international advocacy organisation representing the...


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    HUNDREDS OF SHARKS AND RAYS TANGLED IN PLASTIC

    Jul 05, 2019

    Hundreds of sharks and rays have become tangled in plastic waste in the worlds oceans, new research shows. University of Exeter scientists scoured existing published studies and Twitter for shark and ray entanglements, and found reports of more than 1,000 entangled individuals. And they say the true...


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    NEW DAIRY CATTLE BREEDING METHOD INCREASES GENETIC SELECTION EFFICIENCY

    Jul 05, 2019

    Brazilian scientists at Sao Paulo State University (UNESP) collaborating with colleagues at the University of Maryland and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) have developed a dairy cattle breeding method that adds a new parameter to genetic selection and conserves or even improves a ...


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    PROGRAMMED CELL DEATH: THE ROLES OF CASPASE-1 AND GASDERMIN D IN APOPTOSIS AND PYROPTOSIS

    Jul 05, 2019

    Caspase-1 triggers programmed necrosis called pyroptosis by gasdermin-D (GSDMD) cleavage. GSDMD-deficient cells are, however, susceptible to caspase-1-mediated cell death. Researchers at Kanazawa University and others discovered that caspase-1 proteolytically activates Bid and initiates apoptosis in...


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    NEW BIOMATERIAL COULD ENCAPSULATE AND PROTECT IMPLANTED INSULIN-PRODUCING CELLS

    Jul 04, 2019

    Transplanting insulin-producing pancreatic cells into people with type 1 diabetes has emerged as a ground-breaking treatment for millions of patients over the past few decades. However, one of the barriers to its effectiveness is the body’s natural auto-immune response, which results in the de...


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    CURE HOPE AS RESEARCHERS ELIMINATE HIV FROM DNA OF INFECTED MICE

    Jul 04, 2019

    The world has moved a step closer to universal HIV cure following successful elimination of the virus from DNA of infected mice by American researchers. The feat which holds promise for an estimated 37 million people living with HIV globally was carried out by combined efforts of researchers from Te...


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    GENES COULD PLAY A ROLE IN TOOTH DECAY AND GUM DISEASE

    Jul 04, 2019

    ooth decay and gum disease impact on illness and healthcare spending, yet the role of genetics in dental problems is largely unknown. New research led by an international team, including researchers at the University of Bristol, suggests hereditary traits and factors such as obesity, education and p...


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    NEW STUDY UNRAVELS PROTECTION MECHANISM IN BACTERIA

    Jul 03, 2019

    Scientists at the University of Birmingham have shed fresh light on the mechanism used by certain types of bacteria to protect themselves against attack. Gram negative bacteria can cause diseases such as pneumonia, cholera, typhoid fever and E. coli infections, as well as many hospital acquired infe...


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    PLANTS DON'T THINK, THEY GROW: THE CASE AGAINST PLANT CONSCIOUSNESS

    Jul 03, 2019

    If a tree falls, and no one's there to hear it, does it feel pain and loneliness? No, experts argue in an opinion article publishing on July 3rd in the journal Trends in Plant Science. They draw this conclusion from the research of Todd Feinberg and Jon Mallatt, which explores the evolution of c...


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    CENTURY GETS $250M TO DEVELOP NEXT-GEN ‘OFF THE SHELF’ CANCER CELL THERAPIES

    Jul 03, 2019

    Century Therapeutics has emerged from stealth mode to develop a new generation of ‘off the shelf’ cancer cell therapies, with $250 million backing from investors including Bayer. Created by the $3 billion healthcare investment firm Versant Ventures, Century already has financing commitme...


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    DOTLAB NETS $10M FOR ITS BLOOD TEST TO DIAGNOSE ENDOMETRIOSIS

    Jul 02, 2019

    DotLab has raised $10 million in series A funding to continue development of its personalized, non-invasive approach to diagnosing endometriosis-a difficult-to-spot condition that can cause women pelvic pain and infertility. Current methods of diagnosis, such as biopsies and medical imaging, can be ...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    PANCREATIC CANCER UPDATE: ABANDONED TRIAL, EXCITING RESEARCH, NEW APPOINTMENTS

    Jul 02, 2019

    Pancreatic cancer is a particularly difficult cancer to treat, and although there have been advances in treatment, it is still an extremely deadly disease. Here’s a look at some recent news concerning pancreatic cancer. Boston Biomedical reported that its CanStem111P trial investigating napabu...

    BIOSPACE
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    DATABASE OF GENE TRANSCRIPTION ACROSS MULTIPLE DISEASES LAUNCHED THROUGH WEB APP

    Jul 01, 2019

    Scientists at the Francis Crick Institute have generated a comprehensive database of mouse gene expression across 10 different infectious and inflammatory diseases, and are making the resource freely available to scientists around the world through a web app. The data, which define how the mouse imm...

    THE FRANCIS CRICK INSTITUTE
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    RESEARCHERS IDENTIFY NEW WAY TO MAKE CANCER SELF-DESTRUCT

    Jul 01, 2019

    For years, researchers have been trying to target a gene called MYC that is known to drive tumor growth in multiple cancer types when it is mutated or over-expressed, but hitting that target successfully has proven difficult. Now researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pe...


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    PROTEIN CLUMPS IN ALS NEURONS PROVIDE POTENTIAL TARGET FOR NEW THERAPIES

    Jul 01, 2019

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurological condition that affects motor neurons—the nerve cells that control breathing and muscles. Under a microscope, researchers have noticed that the motor neurons of patients with ALS contain excessive aggregation of a protein called TDP-43. Sinc...


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    SYNTHETIC BACTERIAL MEMORY CIRCUITS ENABLE MICROBIAL DIAGNOSTICS FOR SENSING BIOMOLECULES IN THE GUT

    Jun 28, 2019

    Millions of people take capsules of probiotics with the goal of improving their digestion, but what if those bacteria were also able to detect diseases in the gut and indicate when something is awry? New research from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has crea...


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    BIODEGRADABLE COATING TO HELP ACHIEVE FOOD SECURITY

    Jun 28, 2019

    Associate Professor David Leungs biodegradable coating can help achieve food security in an environmentally friendly and consumer-conscious way. Biotechnology Associate Professor David Leung, in Te Rāngai Pūtaiao College of Science, is working on a nontoxic, biodegradable coating to protect edible p...


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    CONTROLLING DEADLY MALARIA WITHOUT CHEMICALS

    Jun 28, 2019

    Scientists have finally found malarias Achilles heel, a neurotoxin that isnt harmful to any living thing except Anopheles mosquitoes that spread malaria. Nearly half the world's population lives in areas vulnerable to malaria which kills roughly 450,000 people per year, most of them children and...


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    RECORD-BREAKING DNA COMPARISONS DRIVE FAST FORENSICS

    Jun 27, 2019

    Forensic investigators arrive at the scene of a crime to search for clues. There are no known suspects, and every second that passes means more time for the trail to run cold. A DNA sample is discovered, collected, and then sent to a nearby forensics laboratory. There, it is sequenced and fed into a...


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    SCIENTISTS DISCOVER HOW PLANTS BREATHE AND HOW HUMANS SHAPED THEIR LUNGS

    Jun 27, 2019

    Scientists have discovered how plants create networks of air channels the lungs of the leaf to transport carbon dioxide (CO2) to their cells. Botanists have known since the 19th century that leaves have pores—called stomata—and contain an intricate internal network of air channels. But u...


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    HOW DID ELEPHANTS EVOLVE SUCH A LARGE BRAIN? CLIMATE CHANGE IS PART OF THE ANSWER

    Jun 27, 2019

    Elephants have long captivated our attention, partly because of their sheer size and majesty. But we're also struck by their complex behaviour. In some ways, we're fascinated because this behaviour echoes our most humane feelings. For instance, elephants have repeatedly been observed using t...


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    STUDYING THE HUMAN BRAIN THROUGH CRANIOVASCULAR TRAITS

    Jun 26, 2019

    Arteries and veins leave their marks on the bones of the cranium, and these traces can be used in anthropology, bioarchaeology and paleontology to investigate the blood system in extinct species or past populations. This week, the Journal of Anatomy is publishing an article by lead author Emiliano B...


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    THE CASE OF THE POISONED SONGBIRDS

    Jun 26, 2019

    Researchers from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife's Wildlife Investigations Laboratory present their results from a toxicological investigation into a mortality event involving songbirds in a new publication in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. On 17 March 2017, residents in ...


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    UNLOCKING SECRETS OF THE ICE WORM

    Jun 26, 2019

    The ice worm is one of the largest organisms that spends its entire life in ice and Washington State University scientist Scot Hotalilng is one of the only people on the planet studying it. He is the author of a new paper that shows ice worms in the interior of British Columbia have evolved into wha...


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    US AND FRENCH BIOTECH PARTNERSHIP TO DEVELOP OFF-THE-SHELF CELL THERAPIES

    Jun 25, 2019

    The French biotech Erytech will license its red blood cell drug encapsulation technology to the US cell therapy company SQZ Biotechnologies for up to 50M Euros. The partners plan to develop off-the-shelf cell therapies combining Erytech’s red blood cell drug encapsulation with SQZ Biotechnolog...


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    FUND FOR LATE-STAGE EUROPEAN BIOTECHS CLOSES FINAL ROUND WITH 120M EUORS

    Jun 25, 2019

    The Luxembourg-based investor Vesalius Biocapital III has completed the final closing of a €120M fund to boost late-stage life science companies. Around 10-15 companies will receive investments from the fund, including specialists in drug development, med-tech, and diagnostics. Three companies ...


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    GENOME STUDY REVEALS HISTORY OF EUROPEAN POTATO

    Jun 25, 2019

    A team of researchers from Germany, Peru, the U.K. and Spain has sequenced a large number of potato varieties to learn more about the history of the modern European potato. In their paper published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, the group describes their study of the history of the pot...


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    WIDELY AVAILABLE ANTIBIOTICS COULD BE USED IN THE TREATMENT OF 'SUPERBUG' MRSA

    Jun 24, 2019

    Some MRSA infections could be tackled using widely-available antibiotics, suggests new research from an international collaboration led by scientists at the University of Cambridge and the Wellcome Sanger Institute. Since the discovery of penicillin, the introduction of antibiotics to treat infectio...


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    IMPROVED SINGLE-CELL ATAC-SEQ METHOD SCALES UP RESEARCH INTO HOW GENES ARE CONTROLLED

    Jun 24, 2019

    Scientists at Harvard University, collaborating with researchers at Bio-Rad Laboratories, have developed a new platform for rapid single-cell sequencing. The approach combines microfluidics and novel software to scale up single-cell ATAC-seq, which identifies parts of the genome that are open and ac...


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    GEORGE ROSENKRANZ, AN INVENTOR OF THE BIRTH CONTROL PILL, DIES AT 102

    Jun 24, 2019

    (JTA) -George Rosenkranz, a chemist who synthesized the key ingredient in the birth control pill, has died. Rosenkranz, a Hungary native who immigrated to Cuba to escape the Nazis, died Sunday at his home in Atherton, California, at the age of 102. He and two Jewish chemists Carl Djerassi, a refugee...


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    DENTAL MICROWEAR PROVIDES CLUES TO DIETARY HABITS OF LEPIDOSAURIA

    Jun 21, 2019

    High-resolution microscopic images of the surface of dental enamel of lepidosauria, which is a subclass of reptile including monitor lizards, iguanas, lizards and tuatara, allow scientists to determine their dietary habits. The enamel wear patterns reveal significant differences between carnivores a...


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    THE RUMINANT GENOME PROJECT REVEALS THE SECRET LIVES OF DEER

    Jun 21, 2019

    Three teams of researchers working independently have conducted three specific studies of ruminants-a class of mammals that obtains nutrients from plants by fermenting it in chambered stomachs. The work was part of an overall project called, quite naturally, the Ruminant Genome Project. All three te...


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    RECURSION NAMES THERAVANCE VETERAN AS CSO

    Jun 21, 2019

    Recursion has named Sharath Hegde, Ph.D., as its chief scientific officer. The appointment ends a 20-year stint at Theravance Biopharma and its parent company that culminated in Hegde rising to head of research. Hegde joined Theravance as associate director of pharmacology in 1999, 15 years before t...


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    STEM CELL COMPANY PERSUADES EMPLOYERS TO STEER WORKERS TOWARD CONTROVERSIAL THERAPY

    Jun 20, 2019

    A Midwestern grocery chain, Hy-Vee, is taking an unusual — and highly controversial — approach to reducing health care costs. Before employees in certain cities can undergo knee replacement, they first must visit a stem cell provider. Hy-Vee has contracted with one of the United States&r...


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    WHY CLIMATE CHANGE MEANS A RETHINK OF COFFEE AND COCOA PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

    Jun 20, 2019

    Global demand for coffee and cocoa is on the rise. Yet across the equatorial belt where these two crops are produced, the future is not looking bright. Climate change in the tropics is pushing coffee and cocoa closer to the limits of physiological tolerance and constraining the places where they can...


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    DNA MICROSCOPY OFFERS ENTIRELY NEW WAY TO IMAGE CELLS

    Jun 20, 2019

    Microscopy just got reinvented again. Traditionally, scientists have used light, x-rays, and electrons to peer inside tissues and cells. Today, scientists can trace thread-like fibers of nerves throughout the brain and even watch living mouse embryos conjure the beating cells of a rudimentary heart....


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    FDA CLEARS J&J AND GRIFOLS’ BLOOD-STOPPING PROTEIN SPRAY FOR SURGICAL BLEEDS

    Jun 19, 2019

    Johnson and Johnsons Ethicon unit has received a 510(k) clearance from the FDA for its Vistaseal applicators, which spray a biological sealant to stem moderate bleeding during open or laparoscopic surgical procedures. The airless spray products are the first fruit of a broad partnership between the ...


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    BIO-TECHNE NETS FDA BREAKTHROUGH TICKET IN PROSTATE CANCER LIQUID BIOPSY

    Jun 19, 2019

    Bio-Technes urine test, designed to track down the exosomes and genomic markers released from prostate cancer cells, has received a breakthrough device designation from the FDA for ruling out unnecessary tissue biopsies. The company describes its ExoDx Prostate IntelliScore test as the first liquid ...


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    KYMERA ROLLS OUT NEW ANIMAL DATA ON ITS LEAD PROTEIN-DEGRADATION DRUG TO TREAT LYMPHOMA

    Jun 19, 2019

    Massachusetts-based Kymera has emerged as a leading player in a new field known as protein degradation, which is driven by the notion that diseases can be conquered by boosting the bodys innate ability to dispose of the proteins that cause them. On Thursday, the company will roll out new preclinical...


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    MONITORING BIODIVERSITY WITH SOUND: HOW MACHINES CAN ENRICH OUR KNOWLEDGE

    Jun 18, 2019

    For a long time, ecologists have relied on their senses when it comes to recording animal populations and species diversity. However, modern programmable sound recording devices are now the better option for logging animal vocalisations. Scientists lead by the University of Göttingen have inves...


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    DARK CENTERS OF CHROMOSOMES REVEAL ANCIENT DNA

    Jun 18, 2019

    Geneticists exploring the dark heart of the human genome have discovered big chunks of Neanderthal and other ancient DNA. The results open new ways to study both how chromosomes behave during cell division and how they have changed during human evolution. Centromeres sit in the middle of chromosomes...


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    SCIENTISTS IDENTIFY PLANT THAT FLOWERS IN BRAZILIAN SAVANNA ONE DAY AFTER FIRE

    Jun 18, 2019

    Plants in the Brazilian savanna, the Cerrado, have evolved to deal with fire. When fire is used intelligently as part of a carefully planned land management method, it is indispensable to the conservation of this superb ecosystem, the world's most biodiverse savanna. Two months suffice for the C...


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    MEDICINES COMPANY EXECUTIVE JUMPS SHIP TO SCYNEXIS

    Jun 17, 2019

    Antifungal specialist Scynexis has nabbed Nkechi Azie, M.D., as its vice president of clinical development from her role as infectious disease head at The Medicines Company. She comes on board about five months after the New Jersey-based biotech posted new data from the phase 3 test of ibrexafungerp...


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    UNIQURE WEIGHS SALE AFTER HEMOPHILIA GENE THERAPY TURNAROUND

    Jun 17, 2019

    Gene therapy specialist uniQure is considering selling up amid interest from large pharma buyers, according to Bloomberg. The report follows the revitalization of uniQure’s hemophilia B prospect and accompanying triple-digit stock price surge. According to unnamed sources, uniQure is working w...


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    INDUCING AN OSTEOARTHRITIC (OA) PHENOTYPE IN A CARTILAGE-ON-A-CHIP (COC) MODEL

    Jun 17, 2019

    In an aging population, the social impact of osteoarthritis (OA) can dramatically increase to become the most common musculoskeletal disease. However, at present, therapies are limited to palliative treatments or surgical intervention alone, since disease-modifying OA (DMOA) drugs are scarce, primar...


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    BERGENBIO POSTS UPDATED DATA ON TRIAL OF ELDERLY AML PATIENTS

    Jun 14, 2019

    BerGenBio has posted updated data from its phase 2 trial of bemcentinib in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The study is assessing the effect of the oral AXL inhibitor when given to elderly AML patients in combination with low-intensity chemotherapy. The presence of a population of elderly AML patient...


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    NEW OREGON LAB, SEED CERTIFICATION BRING STANDARDS TO HEMP

    Jun 14, 2019

    A unit of wheat is a called a bushel, and a standard weight of potatoes is called a century. But hemp as a fully legal U.S. agricultural commodity is so new that a unit of hemp seed doesn't yet have a universal name or an agreed-upon quantity. That's one example of the startling lack of unif...


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    MIGRATORY HOVERFLIES KEY AS MANY INSECTS DECLINE

    Jun 13, 2019

    Migratory hoverflies are key to pollination and controlling crop pests amid the decline of many other insect species, new research shows. University of Exeter scientists studied the movements of migratory hoverflies and were surprised to find up to four billion migrate to and from Britain each year....


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    THE POWER OF A LOVE SONG: DOPAMINE AFFECTS SEASONAL HEARING IN FISH AND FACILITATES MATING

    Jun 13, 2019

    Many people associate dopamine with reward or attention. Some might think of the part it plays in addiction, or Parkinson's disease, which kills off dopamine-making neurons. Now scientists at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York and Brooklyn College have discovered yet another ...


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    SYNLOGIC, GINKGO EXPAND SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY RESEARCH PACT

    Jun 12, 2019

    Synlogic has tapped Ginkgo Bioworks for a cell programming platform to support development of its pipeline of engineered microbes. Massachusetts-based synthetic biology startup Synlogic began working with Ginkgo in 2017 to gain access to high-throughput organism screening and design capabilities. Th...


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    SUPERWEED RESISTS ANOTHER CLASS OF HERBICIDES, STUDY FINDS

    Jun 11, 2019

    We've all heard about bacteria that are becoming resistant to multiple types of antibiotics. These are the so-called superbugs perplexing and panicking medical science. The plant analogue may just be waterhemp, a broadleaf weed common to corn and soybean fields across the Midwest. With resistanc...


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    RESEARCH REVEALS SUSTAINABLE METHOD TO PRODUCE LIFESAVING OPIATE ANTIDOTES AT REDUCED COST

    Jun 11, 2019

    Overdose from opiates has skyrocketed. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, on average, 130 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose.1 The high cost of antidotes such as NARCAN prevents many first responders from having access to lifesaving antidotes when they need it most....


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    BIOENGINEERED SALMON WON'T COME FROM US'S BIGGEST FARM STATE

    Jun 10, 2019

    Genetically engineered salmon is heading to store shelves in the U.S., but it won't be coming from the biggest salmon farming state in the country. Massachusetts-based AquaBounty Technologies has said American supermarkets could begin selling the much-debated fish by the end of next year. Its fi...


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    NEW INSECT SPECIES DISCOVERED ON THE SLOPES OF THE MAUNGATUA RANGE

    Jun 10, 2019

    A team of zoologists from the University Otago has discovered a new species of insect—the Maungatua stonefly—from the slopes of the Maungatua Range, on the doorstep of Dunedin. The unique stonefly, just under 2cm in length, has so far been found living in only a few hundred metres of sub...


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    HOW TO DEVELOP AFFORDABLE SENSORS USING SLIME MOLD

    Jun 07, 2019

    Physarum polycephalum, which literally means "many-headed slime," is a slime mold that inhabits damp and dark habitats, such as decaying wood. Thanks to its ability to respond to stimuli such as light, chemicals and vibrations, this single-celled, self-growing organism has attracted the at...


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    WHEN SOCIAL INTERACTION HELPS YOU CHOOSE YOUR FOOD

    Jun 07, 2019

    How do we choose our food? By studying the neurobiological mechanisms involved in food choices of rodents, neuroscientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, have identified the important and lasting influence that peers can have on eating habits. Indeed, sensory stimuli linked to soc...


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    TWO NEW SPECIES OF 'TWEEZER-BEAKED HOPPING RATS' DISCOVERED IN PHILIPPINES

    Jun 06, 2019

    Just about everybody loves peanut butter. We put it on sandwiches and in candy, we use it to trick our dogs into taking their heartworm pills, and, when we have to, we bait mouse traps with it. But, as scientists learned when trapping rodents in the mountains of the Philippines, peanut butter isn...


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    HOW FLOW SHAPES BACTERIAL BIOFILMS

    Jun 06, 2019

    EPFL biophysicists have taken a systematic look into how bacterial biofilms are affected by fluid flow. The findings can give us clues about the physical rules guiding biofilm architecture, but also about the social dynamics that shape evolution. Although we tend to think of them as solitary sojourn...


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    MASSIVE BIO, IBM WATSON, OTHERS TEAM UP WITH BIDEN CANCER INITIATIVE FOR ONCOLOGY WORK

    Jun 04, 2019

    Trial matchmaker Massive Bio, IBM Watson and a host of other organizations have partnered with former Vice President Joe Bidens Cancer Initiative to help improve patients access to and the work coming from cancer studies.This will be done via the so-called Oncology Clinical Trial Information Commons...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    IN A MUCH-NEEDED POSITIVE FOR BMS, CELGENE GAINS FDA REVIEW FOR BLOCKBUSTER HOPEFUL

    Jun 04, 2019

    The $74 billion deal that will see Bristol-Myers Squibb subsume Celgene into its ranks is all but done, but its been a rocky path. Today, Celgene delivered some positive optics for its would-be parent.
    The Big Biotech and partner Acceleron say that blood disease drug luspatercept, a blockbust...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    ASCO: SHRINKING 60% OF LUNG CANCERS, BLUEPRINT'S RET DRUG POISED FOR 2020 FILING

    Jun 03, 2019

    CHICAGO-Blueprint Medicines RET inhibitor BLU-667 shrank tumors in 60% of a difficult-to-treat group of lung cancer patients, teeing it up for a 2020 filing in patients with RET-altered non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had already tried chemotherapy.The phase 2 data, presented Monday at the an...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=32443244

    ASCO: ASTELLAS, SEATTLE GENETICS' ADC BANISHES 12% OF BLADDER CANCERS

    Jun 03, 2019

    Astellas and Seattle Genetics unveiled data showing their antibody-drug conjugate shrank 44% of tumors and eliminated 12% of them in patients with advanced urothelial cancer. The treatment, enfortumab vedotin, could become an option for patients whose cancer has worsened despite receiving chemothera...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    THE TOP 10 PHARMA R&D BUDGETS IN 2018

    Jun 03, 2019

    Big Pharma companies are still, naturally, the big spenders in drug R&D, and the numbers are impressive: Last year, and for the first time, the top 15 largest companies (by sales) funneled more than $100 billion into research, and we also saw the FDA approve more drugs than ever before.
    B...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=32363236

    QUEST DIAGNOSTICS REPORTS BILLING DATA BREACH COMPROMISING 11.9M PATIENTS

    Jun 03, 2019

    Quest Diagnostics, one of the worlds largest blood testing companies, has reported that a cybersecurity breach at its debt collection agency may have revealed the personal and medical information of nearly 12 million of its customers, over a period of eight months.
    In a filing with the SEC, Q...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=32373237

    ASCO: COMPLETE RESPONSE RATE IN NEKTAR MELANOMA TRIAL HITS 34%

    Jun 01, 2019

    Nektar Therapeutics has posted updated data on its NKTR-214-Opdivo cocktail in first-line melanoma. The data features four more complete responses, bringing the rate up 10 percentage points to 34%.Around this time last year, Nektar left the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual me...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR CLINICAL TRIAL DATA—ALL OF IT

    May 31, 2019

    Banks can detect fraud the instant it happens, saving them millions annually. Retail operations seem to recommend products as soon as we think of them. And manufacturers can perform maintenance on machines before they break down, preventing lost production time.Meanwhile, pharmaceutical and biotech ...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    ASLAN RETOOLS CSL DEAL, TAKING CONTROL OF WOULD-BE DUPIXENT RIVAL

    May 31, 2019

    Aslan Pharmaceuticals has secured the global rights to atopic dermatitis candidate ASLAN004 from CLS. The revision of the original deal ties Aslan to milestones including a $30 million payment when ASLAN004 enters phase 3.Singapores Aslan first secured a stake in anti-IL-13Rα1 antibody ASLAN00...

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    WITH $110M AND JOHNS HOPKINS TECH, THRIVE AIMS TO MAKE EARLY CANCER SCREENING ROUTINE

    May 30, 2019

    Steven Kafka, the former Foundation Medicine chief operating officer who landed at Third Rock Ventures after a globetrotting gap year,has a new gig: CEO of Thrive Earlier Detection, a liquid biopsy company looking to catch cancer earlier through a routine blood test. The company comes to life with $...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    NAVITAS LIFE SCIENCES BUYS UP KAI RESEARCH, ADDING TO LATER-STAGE TRIAL OFFERINGS

    May 30, 2019

    Contract research organization KAI Research has been snapped up by fellow CRO Navitas Life Sciences as it looks to boost its study offerings.Specifically, the buy, financial details of which have not been shared, will see Navitas expand its phase 2 and 3 trial work in North America while adding to i...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    JOHNS HOPKINS LAUNCHES LIQUID BIOPSY COMPANY WITH $110 MILLION SERIES A

    May 30, 2019

    Thrive Earlier Detection Corp., a liquid biopsy company, raised $110 million in Series A funding. The company is launching CancerSEEK, a liquid biopsy test to detect multiple cancers early. The round was led by Third Rock Ventures with Section 32, Casdin Capital, Biomatics Capital, BlueCross BlueShi...

    BIOSPACE
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    €60M INVESTMENT TO BOOST OXFORD BIOMEDICA’S GENE AND CELL THERAPIES

    May 29, 2019

    The investment will bag Novo Holdings a stake of up to 10.1% in the UK biotech. Oxford Biomedica will use the money to repay a loan totalling €49M ($55M) from the US company Oaktree Capital Management, and to develop its gene therapy technology.Oxford Biomedica’s most advanced gene therap...

    LABIOTECH.EU
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    INOVIO SHARES FALL AS ASTRAZENECA PARES DOWN PARTNERSHIP

    May 29, 2019

    As the dust settles on a continued exodus at AstraZeneca and faces and units are replaced, it seems the U.K.-based Big Pharma is starting to look at cutting some of the fat from its external pacts, and Inovio Pharmaceuticals is in the crosshairs.AstraZeneca's biologics arm MedImmune and Inovio h...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    27-YEAR-OLD SEARCH MARKETING CEO LANDS 13-STOP U.S. SPEAKING TOUR

    May 29, 2019

    Garrett Mehrguth, the CEO and co-founder of the B2B and enterprise search marketing agency, Directive, recently was selected to speak at 13 stops of the Digital Summit tour. Digital Summit, the largest conference series in the digital marketing industry, has invited Mehrguth to share his unique pres...

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    ASTRAZENECA PIVOTS TO EARLY-STAGE CANCER IN SEARCH OF A NICHE

    May 28, 2019

    AstraZeneca is set to prioritize the treatment of early-stage cancers under the leadership of oncology research chief José Baselga, M.D., Ph.D. Talking to The Wall Street Journal, Baselga sketched out why he thinks splitting off from the congested pursuit of late-stage cancers will benefit As...

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    BIOTECH IPO BONANZA, AGAIN, AS 5 GO FOR COLLECTIVE $600M-PLUS IN OFFERINGS

    May 28, 2019

    Just before Memorial Day weekend, five biotech companies dropped their initial public offering plans, adding up to $611 million in anticipated cash.First, there's late-stage genetic disease-focused BridgeBio Pharma, which wants a whopping $225 million. Building on its policy of not waiting aroun...

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    ICON BUYS UP MAJORITY OF MEDINOVA TO BOOST RESEARCH SITE FOOTPRINT

    May 28, 2019

    Acquisitive Icon is at it again as it snaps up a majority stake in British site network company MeDiNova Research with an option to buy out the remaining shares penned into the deal.
    Coventry, England-based MeDiNova Research, a network with research sites in key markets in Europe and Africa, ...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    BIOMARIN ANNOUNCES THAT PHASE 3 COHORT OF VALOCTOCOGENE ROXAPARVOVEC, GENE THERAPY STUDY IN SEVERE HEMOPHILIA

    May 28, 2019

    SAN RAFAEL, Calif., May 28, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc. (NASDAQ: BMRN) announced today that its investigational gene therapy, valoctocogene roxaparvovec, for adults with severe hemophilia A achieved pre-specified clinical criteria for regulatory review in the U.S. and Europe. A...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=32133213

    FRED HUTCHINSON TEAM USES GOLD NANOPARTICLES TO IMPROVE CRISPR GENE EDITING

    May 27, 2019

    The CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing system has been hailed as a promising solution to a range of genetic diseases, but the technology has proven difficult to deliver into cells. One strategy is to open the cell membrane using an electric shock, but that can accidentally kill the cell. Another is to use vir...


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    NEKTAR FORMS NEW SUBSIDIARY IN ANTICIPATION OF OPIOID MEDICATION APPROVAL

    May 24, 2019

    With a potential approval of an opioid molecule awaiting regulatory review, Nektar Therapeutics announced the launch of a new subsidiary, Inheris Biopharma, Inc., which will be responsible for the launch and commercialization of the opioid.NKTR-181 is a novel, first-in-class, investigational opioid ...

    BIOSPACE
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=32063206

    DEVICE RAPIDLY MEASURES GROWTH OF SINGLE CELLS SIMULTANEOUSLY

    May 24, 2019

    A new technique invented at MIT can precisely measure the growth of many individual cells simultaneously. The advance holds promise for fast drug tests, offers new insights into growth variation across single cells within larger populations, and helps track the dynamic growth of cells to changing en...

    BIOENGINEER.ORG
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    AMPRION JOINS THE FIGHT AGAINST PARKINSON'S THROUGH EARLY DETECTION TESTING

    May 23, 2019

    Amprion today announced its proprietary technology, Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification (PMCA) using CSF and plasma alpha-Synuclein (αS) to aid in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, received a Breakthrough Device designation from U.S. FDA."Prions are proteins gone rogue. This i...

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    FDA PERMITS MARKETING OF FIRST DIAGNOSTIC TEST TO AID IN DETECTING PROSTHETIC JOINT INFECTIONS

    May 23, 2019

    Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration permitted marketing of the Synovasure Lateral Flow Test Kit as an aid for the detection of periprosthetic joint infection (infection around a joint replacement) in the synovial (lubricant) fluid of patients being evaluated for revision surgery, which is s...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=32033203

    6SENSE LAUNCHES ACCOUNT-BASED EXTERNAL MEDIA CAMPAIGNS ANALYTICS

    May 23, 2019

    Today 6sense, a leading Account Based Orchestration Platform, powered by AI, announced its External Media Campaigns feature. This capability extends 6sense's ability to track digital media campaigns launched on non-6sense platforms for use in account segmentation within the 6sense platform, and ...

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    EVOTEC DIVERSIFIES INTO BIOLOGICS WITH $90 MILLION ACQUISITION OF JUST BIOTHERAPEUTICS

    May 22, 2019

    Germany-based Evotec SE followed up a string of collaborations with pharma companies with the $90 million acquisition of Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation-backed Just Biotherapeutics. Evotec said the all-cash deal for the Seattle-based Just.Bio will provide it with additional business opportunitie...

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    AMGEN BIDS $167M TO BUY DRUG DISCOVERY SHOP NUEVOLUTION

    May 22, 2019

    Amgen has offered $167 million (€150 million) to buy Nuevolution. The takeover will give Amgen control of a drug discovery platform that landed Nuevolution deals with leading companies plus a pipeline of early-stage cancer and inflammation programs. Denmark’s Nuevolution made a name for i...

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    TISSUE ENGINEERING IMPROVED BY USE OF MOLECULAR TETHERS

    May 22, 2019

    Scientists at the University of Washington  (UW) say they developed a novel method to keep proteins intact and functional by modifying them at a specific point so that they can be chemically tethered to an engineered scaffold using light. Since the tether can also be cut by laser light, this te...

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
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    EVOTEC ACQUIRES CDMO JUST BIOTHERAPEUTICS IN US$90M DEAL

    May 21, 2019

    Just Biotherapeutics started in 2015 with the mission to optimise and produce biologics at a price affordable even for low income countries. For the application of its technological solution, the Seattle-based company received grants for projects worth more than $30m in grants from the Bill & Me...

    EUROPEAN BIOTECHNOLOGY
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    BUMPER DAY FOR BRITISH BIOTECH AS STARTUPS GET CASH HAUL, MAJOR RESEARCH WINDFALL

    May 20, 2019

    British biotech is often a disregarded backwater when it comes to the international view of life sciences, but today a host of positive news has shone the spotlight back onto its potential. Since the disaster that was Circassia, a British biotech that got a record-smashing IPO then plummeted back to...


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    WITH LONG-TERM DATA, MED CO, ALNYLAM’S CHOLESTEROL-FIGHTER INCLISIRAN POISED FOR 2019 FILING

    May 20, 2019

    The Medicines Company announced long-term data for its Alnylam-partnered siRNA drug inclisiran, showing that the drug consistently lowered “bad” LDL cholesterol by more than 50%. The company expects to reveal pivotal phase 3 data in the third quarter and to file for FDA approval before t...


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    SCHRÖDINGER RAISES MORE CASH, AMASSING $110M FOR R&D DRIVE

    May 20, 2019

    Schrödinger has raised more money, bringing the total size of its recent haul up to $110 million. The computing-enabled R&D shop will use the funds to advance its nascent pipeline of wholly owned drugs. New York-based Schrödinger has moved deeper and deeper into biopharma R&D over ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=31863186

    ABBVIE HALTS BRAIN TUMOR STUDY DUE TO LACK OF SURVIVAL BENEFITS

    May 17, 2019

    AbbVie announced that it has halted its Phase III INTELLANCE-1 clinical trial of depatuxizumab mafodotin (Depatux-M) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) whose tumors have epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification. An Independent Data Monitoring Committee (IDMC) recommende...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=31783178

    FDA APPROVES FIRST VTE TREATMENT FOR PEDIATRIC PATIENTS

    May 17, 2019

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave Pfizer the green light to begin marketingits treatment for symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pediatric patients. This is the first such medicine approved for this condition in pediatric patients. On Thursday, the FDA approved Pfizer’s ...


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    FDA’S PROJECT FACILITATE TO LAUNCH BY END OF MAY

    May 17, 2019

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) held a public workshop yesterday to explain its goals and progress on Project Facilitate. Project Facilitate is a pilot project to create a single point of contact for the FDA’s oncology expanded access requests. In order to do so, the FDA will run a...


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    NEW RESEARCH FINDS CANE TOADS USE POISON AS A LAST RESORT

    May 16, 2019

    Cane toads are exhausted by releasing their deadly toxin and will go to great lengths not to release it. They far prefer to run or freeze when a predator approaches. The cost to the cane toad for releasing the poison is substantial, including reduced growth and activity. The toad takes several month...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=31713171

    BIOGEN’S EXPERIMENTAL DRUG SHOWS PROMISE FOR GENETIC FORM OF ALS

    May 15, 2019

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating disease with no approved treatments. Diagnosis is tantamount to a death sentence and researchers are desperately searching for some kind of therapy. Although there have been numerous failed treatments, Biogen believes it might be on the right trac...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=31663166

    BIOTECH'S TOP 10 MONEY RAISERS OF 2018

    May 15, 2019

    If 2017 was a banner year for biotech venture capital, 2018 blew it out of the water. Last year, private biotech companies reeled in a grand total of $16.8 billion, eclipsing 2017’s then-record $12.1 billion by 39%. And it wasn’t just the total spent that smashed records: The average per...


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    HOW THE SNAIL’S SHELL GOT ITS COIL

    May 14, 2019

    If you look at a snail’s shell, the chances are it will coil to the right. But, occasionally, you might find an unlucky one that twists in the opposite direction – as fans of Jeremy the lefty snail will remember, these snails struggle to mate with the more common rightward-coiling indivi...


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    MYOVANT HITS GOAL IN UTERINE FIBROID PHASE 3, TEEING UP ABBVIE SHOWDOWN

    May 14, 2019

    A phase 3 trial of Myovant Sciences' uterine fibroid drug relugolix has hit its primary endpoint, moving the Roivant unit a step closer to a planned filing for approval. The drug comfortably beat placebo against a slew of efficacy endpoints and posted comparable safety and tolerability to the co...


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    SOLID TANKS AS SAFETY SCARE AGAIN ROCKS DMD GENE THERAPY

    May 14, 2019

    A safety scare has rocked Solid Biosciences’ drive to get its Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene therapy program back on track. The first patient treated with the higher dose of SGT-001 suffered a serious adverse event, reigniting concerns about the safety of the candidate and wiping 35% o...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=31633163

    AWAKENING STEM CELLS TO UNLOCK THE BRAIN'S REGENERATIVE POTENTIAL

    May 13, 2019

    The human body has powerful healing abilities. But treating brain disorders is no easy task, as brain cells—neurons—have limited ability to regenerate. Nonetheless, stem cells are a form of natural backup, a vestige of our days as still-developing embryos. The difficulty is that with age...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=31543154

    INHIBITORY SYNAPSES GROW AS 'TRAFFIC CONTROLLER' AT BUSY NEURAL INTERSECTIONS

    May 13, 2019

    Neurons pass on information to one another via synapses. The vast majority of these synapses are excitatory, which increase the activity of the receiving neuron. Around 10 to 20 percent of synapses have the opposite effect, and are called inhibitory. Researchers at Utrecht University have discovered...


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    HOW MUTATIONS LEAD TO NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASE

    May 13, 2019

    Scientists have discovered how mutations in DNA can cause neurodegenerative disease. The discovery is an important step towards better treatment to slow the progression or delay onset in a range of incurable diseases such as Huntington's and motor neurone disease – possibly through the use...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=31563156

    GILEAD PLEDGES 2.4 MILLION ANNUAL DOSE DONATIONS OF DRUG TO END HIV IN THE U.S.

    May 10, 2019

    As part of a national effort from the federal government to combat HIV and prevent future infections, Gilead Sciences announced it will annually donate 2.4 million doses of its HIV treatment Truvada for PrEP to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to provide treatment for uninsu...


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    MODERNA PUBLISHES INFLUENZA VACCINE CLINICAL TRIAL DATA

    May 10, 2019

    Moderna announced the publication of results from two Phase I clinical trials of mRNA vaccines against two strains of influenza, H10N8 and H7N0. They were both published in the journal Vaccine. Both strains of influenza virus have shown high fatality rates, but neither has received vaccine approval....


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    NEW PROGRESS IN DEVELOPING AN ANIMAL MODEL OF HEPATITIS C

    May 10, 2019

    Small differences in a liver cell protein have significant impacts on hepatitis C virus replication in mice and humans, findings that could facilitate the development of a mouse model of the infection. The report, led by researchers at Princeton University, was published today in the journal eLife. ...


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    BIOSPACE GLOBAL BIOPHARMA ROUNDUP

    May 09, 2019

    BioNTech – Germany-based BioNTech acquired San Diego-based MabVax Therapeutics to bolster its portfolio with MVT-5873, MabVax’s lead candidate. MVT-5873 is a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody targeting sialyl Lewis A (sLea), an epitope expressed in pancreatic and other GI cancers that...


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    4 BIOTECH COMPANIES LIST ON THE NASDAQ TODAY

    May 09, 2019

    Four biotech companies began trading on the Nasdaq this morning. Compared to last year’s big-money initial public offerings, it’s been a relatively slow year to date. March, however, markedseven life science IPOs, including Precision BioSciences, GenFit, Hookipa, Turning Point Therapeuti...


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    May 09, 2019

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    BIOSPACES GLOBAL BIOPHARMA ROUNDUP

    May 09, 2019

    BioNTech – Germany-based BioNTech acquired San Diego-based MabVax Therapeutics to bolster its portfolio with MVT-5873, MabVax’s lead candidate. MVT-5873 is a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody targeting sialyl Lewis A (sLea), an epitope expressed in pancreatic and other GI cancers that...


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    WILL GOVERNMENT INCENTIVES HELP BOOST ANTIBIOTIC DEVELOPMENT? SOME PHARMA COMPANIES THINK SO

    May 09, 2019

    Over and over there are reports about the increasing rise of antibiotic-resistant bugs. Even as the number of resistant bacteria increases, the number of companies developing new types of antibiotics is decreasing. Earlier this year, a coalition of healthcare organizations, along with U.S. antibioti...


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    4 BIOTECH COMPANIES LIST ON THE NASDAQ TODAY

    May 09, 2019

    Four biotech companies began trading on the Nasdaq this morning. Compared to last year’s big-money initial public offerings, it’s been a relatively slow year to date. March, however, markedseven life science IPOs, including Precision BioSciences, GenFit, Hookipa, Turning Point Therapeuti...


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    TUMOR CELLS' DRUG ADDICTION MAY BE THEIR DOWNFALL

    May 02, 2019

    Blocking the processes that drive cancer cell growth is at the heart of many new anti-cancer therapies. Unfortunately, after initial success, cancer cells are generally able to develop workarounds to reactivate the pathways that promote growth. Work by researchers at the Babraham Institute in partne...


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    BATS EVOLVED DIVERSE SKULL SHAPES DUE TO ECHOLOCATION, DIET

    May 02, 2019

    Humans may be forgiven for overlooking bats. After all, many bat species are out and about when we're turning in. And generations of Dracula lore may have made us a little wary. But bats are a diverse bunch. They make up one of the largest groups of mammals, with more than 1,300 species worldwid...


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    RESEARCHERS READY B CELLS FOR NOVEL CELL THERAPY

    May 02, 2019

    Scientists at Seattle Children's Research Institute are paving the way to use gene-edited B cells -- a type of white blood cell in the immune system -- to treat a wide range of potential diseases that affect children, including hemophilia and other protein deficiency disorders, autoimmune diseas...


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    NEWBORN BRAIN CELLS, EVEN AT OLD AGE

    May 02, 2019

    Neurogenesis is the growth or development of new neural cells. One of the most heated debates in neuroscience is whether or not neurogenesis ceases once the brain stops developing in adolescence. Can adult brains make new neurons? Recently, a new study published in the journal Nature Neuroscience fo...


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    A EXPLOSION OF GENETIC DATA BRINGS ERRORS THAT GROW

    May 02, 2019

    A team of researchers at Washington State University (WSU) wanted to know the minimum proteins that were required for gram-negative microbes called Proteobacteria to survive. The team compiled a dataset of 2,300 bacterial genomes, containing sequences for nearly nine million proteins, which were gro...


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    CANNABIS SLOWS LUNG CANCER IN MICE

    May 02, 2019

    A group of researchers at Rangsit University, a private university in Pathum Thani, Thailand, have revealed that two cannabis extracts stopped the growth of lung cancer in mice. The team is planning to now move onto human trials. This finding was announced at the launch of the university’s Med...


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    UTI BACTERIA’S “SUPERGLUE” SECRETS REVEALED

    Apr 30, 2019

    Scientists at La Trobe University and the University of Queensland describe in Nature Communications how proteins in the outer membrane of bacteria are able to stick to and populate parts of the human body. This new information paves the way for the development of innovative treatments for preventin...


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    CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME BLOOD TEST SENSITIVE TO IMMUNE STRESS

    Apr 30, 2019

    Scientists at Stanford University and the University of California, Irvine, have developed a nanosensor-based test that can diagnose chronic fatigue syndrome (CSF) by measuring how immune system cells in plasma respond to stress. While to date there has been no reliable, standard test for the often-...


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    SEIZURE FLY MODEL REVEALS ROLE FOR GLIAL CELLS IN EPILEPSY

    Apr 30, 2019

    Roughly 60 million people worldwide have epilepsy, a neurological condition characterized by seizures resulting from excessive neural activity. Using a fruit fly model of epilepsy, where seizures result from neurons that are vulnerable to becoming hyper activated by stress, new research has identifi...


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    EFFORTS TO CREATE VIRUS-RESISTANT CASSAVA PLANTS BACKFIRE

    Apr 27, 2019

    Scientists developed the CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing technology only a few years ago, and as it's used in more applications, potential drawbacks to the tool are being revealed. In the cassava plant, the editing technology has enabled researchers to engineer a cassava plant that produces a starch th...


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    MASSIVE SURVEY REVEALS NEARLY 200,000 NEW MARINE VIRAL SPECIES

    Apr 26, 2019

    After a global survey of the world’s oceans, an international team of researchers has found almost 200,000 new species of marine viruses. One sailboat, the Tara, was used to gather the analysis from 2009 to 2013 as part of a larger project that aims to learn more about the impacts of climate c...


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    IS THERE REALLY A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN INDICA AND SATIVA?

    Apr 26, 2019

    The idea that there are different strains, (Cannabis indica and Cannabis sativa), has almost become cannabis dogma. They look different, indicas are typically shorter and more scrub-like while sativas are taller. They came from different regions, indicas from Afghanistan and India and sativas from c...


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    THE UNIVERSE'S FIRST MOLECULE DISCOVERED INSIDE DISTANT PLANETARY NEBULA

    Apr 26, 2019

    The helium hydride cation (HeH+), a molecule formed by the two elements at the top of the periodic table, was first synthesized a by-product in a laboratory back in 1925. Scientists have long suspected that this unorthodox molecule may exist in the interstellar medium since the infancy of our univer...


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    SEATTLE GENETICS' ADCETRIS SALES FALL SHORT YET AGAIN

    Apr 26, 2019

    Despite slow quarter-over-quarter growth, Seattle Genetics CEO Clay Siegall reiterated confidence in the biotech's ability to meet its financial expectations this year. In particular, Siegall cited seasonal market factors as well as the biotech's battle to drive uptake in frontline Hodgkin l...


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    OCEAN ACIDIFICATION 'COULD HAVE CONSEQUENCES FOR MILLIONS'

    Apr 26, 2019

    Ocean acidification could have serious consequences for the millions of people globally whose lives depend on coastal protection, fisheries and aquaculture, a new publication suggests. Writing in Emerging Topics in Life Sciences, scientists say that only significant cuts in fossil fuel emissions wil...


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    HUMANIZATION OF ANTIBODIES TARGETING HUMAN HERPESVIRUS 6B

    Apr 26, 2019

    A research group led by Professor Yasuko Mori (Division of Clinical Virology, Center for Infectious Diseases, Kobe University) have succeeded in humanization of mouse antibodies that can neutralize the infection caused by human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B). Infection by HHV-6B in infants can lead to comp...


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    RED-NECK PHALAROPE: A MIGRATORY DIVIDE TOWARDS THE PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE ARABIAN SEA

    Apr 26, 2019

    When winter comes, populations of red-neck phalarope from the Western Palearctic migrate to two different destinations -the Pacific Ocean or the Arabian Sea- following an exceptional migratory divide strategy which has never been described in this geographical area. A part of these bird populations ...


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    ROCHE’S SPARK BUYOUT DELAYED … AGAIN

    Apr 26, 2019

    On February 25, Roche announced plans to acquire Spark Therapeutics for $114.50 per share, a value of about $4.3 billion. Today, Roche announced it had withdrawn its Premerger Notification and Report Form under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Act over the deal. They intend to refile their respective forms on ...


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    UK SCIENTISTS ENGINEER CELL MEMBRANE FOR LONG-LASTING CELL THERAPY

    Apr 25, 2019

    Scientists at the University of Bristol, UK, have made a cell therapy that produces a glue-like hydrogel, which could make stem cells last for longer in the body and help wound healing in conditions such as type 2 diabetes. Cell therapies have a lot of potential for healing wounds and regenerating t...


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    J&J'S QUEST TO DETECT LUNG CANCER BEFORE IT EMERGES

    Apr 25, 2019

    Smoking causes injuries in the respiratory tract that can evolve into lung cancer. Researchers from Johnson & Johnson Innovation and Boston University wondered whether it might be possible to prevent lung lesions from becoming cancerous, and now they've found biomarkers that might make such ...


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    6SENSE EXPANDS INTEGRATION WITH HUBSPOT FOR HEIGHTENED ACCOUNT BASED ORCHESTRATION

    Apr 25, 2019

    6sense, a leading Account Based Orchestration Platform, powered by AI, announced $27 million in funding. The round was led by Industry Ventures and included participation from existing investors Bain Capital Ventures, Battery Ventures, Costanoa Ventures, Salesforce Ventures, and Venrock. “We b...

    SOURCE
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    GENE REGULATION FINDING ADVANCES UNDERSTANDING OF NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS

    Apr 25, 2019

    Researchers at the Duke-NUS Medical School say they have found that members of the multiprotein Integrator complex, known for its role in gene regulation, are crucial for healthy brain development in fruit flies. The findings have implications for further understanding and treating neurodevelopmenta...


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    GENE THERAPY LEADERS URGE GLOBAL MORATORIUM ON GERMLINE EDITING

    Apr 24, 2019

    On the eve of DNA Day, leaders in the gene therapy community have co-signed a letter to Alex Azar, the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), urging a “binding global moratorium” on germline editing. The letter is signed by more than 60 luminaries in the fields ...


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    SOME VERSIONS OF THE LONGEVITY GENE ARE SPRYER THAN OTHERS

    Apr 24, 2019

    Different animal species drink from different fountains of youth, which flow with waters of different potency. That’s the gist of a new study of the SIRT6 protein, which is encoded by the so-called longevity gene. In some species, SIRT6 variants repair damaged DNA more efficiently, better pres...


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    COUNTERING OBESITY COULD BE AS SIMPLE AS…SMELLING WITH YOUR TONGUE?

    Apr 24, 2019

    I know what you’re thinking, did I not have enough coffee this morning and totally misread that title? Well, don’t fret. Your groggy eyes did not deceive you, as investigators at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia have made an intriguing discovery, which shows that functio...


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    CHEMOTHERAPY OR NOT? NEW DISCOVERIES HELP DETERMINE WHO WILL BENEFIT FROM CHEMOTHERAPY

    Apr 24, 2019

    Case Western Reserve University researchers and partners, including a collaborator at Cleveland Clinic, are pushing the boundaries of how "smart" diagnostic-imaging machines identify cancers—and uncovering clues outside the tumor to tell whether a patient will respond well to chemoth...


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    US MEASLES CASES HIT HIGHEST MARK IN 25 YEARS

    Apr 24, 2019

    U.S. measles cases in 2019 have climbed to their highest level in 25 years in a resurgence largely attributed to misinformation that is turning parents against vaccines. New York City health officials on Wednesday reported 61 new cases since late last week, pushing this year's nationwide tally p...


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    BLOOD THINNER FOUND TO SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCE SUBSEQUENT HEART FAILURE RISKS

    Apr 24, 2019

    Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that using blood thinners in patients with worsening heart failure, coronary artery disease or irregular heart rhythms was associated with a 17 percent reduced risk of thromboembolic events, such as stroke and heart attack. H...


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    STROKE PATIENTS RECEIVE DIFFERENT AMOUNTS OF PHYSICAL THERAPY

    Apr 24, 2019

    Medicare-covered stroke patients receive vastly different amounts of physical and occupational therapy during hospital stays despite evidence that such care is strongly associated with positive health outcomes, a new study by Brown University researchers found. The research team, led by Amit Kumar, ...


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    ASIA REGULATORY ROUNDUP: KOREAN GENE THERAPY PROBE TRIGGERS ACCUSATIONS OF DATA FABRICATION, LAWSUIT

    Apr 23, 2019

    The publication of an interim analysis of the cells used in the Invossa gene therapy has intensified the pressure on its producer, Kolon Life Science. Following the release of the regulatory report, Kolon had to defend itself against accusations of data fabrication, and a law firm began recruiting p...


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    WHEN DESIGNING CLINICAL TRIALS FOR HUNTINGTON'S DISEASE, FIRST ASK THE EXPERTS

    Apr 23, 2019

    Progress in understanding the genetic mutation responsible for Huntington's disease (HD) and at least some molecular underpinnings of the disease has resulted in a new era of clinical testing of potential treatments. How best to design clinical trials in which HD patients are willing to particip...


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    PROOFREADING THE BOOK OF LIFE: GENE EDITING MADE SAFER

    Apr 23, 2019

    The advance of science is something like the wandering of an explorer through an uncharted jungle. Often, the dense undergrowth can seem impenetrable, but at certain privileged moments, a clearing opens, and an entirely new landscape emerges. Something like this is occurring in the field of biology ...

    ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY
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    DRUG REGULATORS LOOK FOR COMMON COURSE ON GENE-THERAPY REVIEWS

    Apr 23, 2019

    Europe’s medicines regulator is talking with its U.S. counterpart to harmonize the way the two agencies assess a new generation of therapies that repair genetic defects as a wave of the revolutionary treatments nears the market. “We are absolutely keen to explore a common solution,&rdquo...


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    IS 'HIGH DOLLAR' ABOUT TO BECOME THE NEW NORMAL IN SPECIALTY PHARMACY?

    Apr 23, 2019

    In specialty pharmacy, we are used to handling high-cost medications. In fact, a high price point is typically included in the general definition of what constitutes a specialty therapy. However, we are rapidly approaching new heights in terms of what the term “high dollar” could mean in...


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    NEW INSIGHT INTO HOW OBESITY, INSULIN RESISTANCE CAN IMPAIR COGNITION

    Apr 22, 2019

    Obesity can break down our protective blood brain barrier resulting in problems with learning and memory, scientists report. They knew that chronic activation of the receptor Adora2a on the endothelial cells that line this important barrier in our brain can let factors from the blood enter the brain...


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    THREE DIRECTORS ‘RETIRE’ IN FALSE PHD CLAIM CONTROVERSY

    Apr 22, 2019

    Three directors of a company that developed and sold a headband marketed as helping autistic children “retired” following revelations that the device inventor falsely claimed to possess a PhD in neuroscience. The Sunday Times of Malta reported in March that Adrian Attard Trevisan had fal...


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    OFFICE OF THE FUTURE: 4 AMAZING WAYS TECHNOLOGY WILL CHANGE YOUR WORKPLACE

    Apr 22, 2019

    Not everyone will go the remote route. Those still working from an office will enjoy a multitude of benefits that technology brings with it. It’s no secret the way we work is changing. Younger generations are entering the workforce and new technologies influence our processes and decisions at ...


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    STEM WORKSHOP TO FOCUS ON SUPPORTING WOMEN IN SCIENCE

    Apr 22, 2019

    Do barriers exist that limit the advancement of women in science? A workshop this Friday will center on that topic and how the community can encourage women's success in science fields. The discussion-centered Having it All: A STEM Work-Life Workshop is from noon to 1:30 p.m. Friday, April 26, i...


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    COGNITIVE TRAINING IMPROVES REASONING AND MEMORY IN ADULTS WITH MILD IMPAIRMENT, PILOT STUDY FINDS

    Apr 22, 2019

    Cognitive training alone without the use of direct brain stimulation may significantly benefit adults with mild cognitive impairment, a known risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, a pilot clinical study report. The study, “Cognitive Training and Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in ...


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    EPIGENETICS COULD ALTER THE WAY WE BREED CROPS FOR DROUGHT AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    Apr 19, 2019

    Crops that can withstand the ravages of climate change or resist killer diseases? Many already have been developed — including varieties of bananas, cassava, wheat and oranges  but they languish on laboratory shelves as their creators navigate the complex, and sometimes contradictory, reg...

    GENETICLITERACYPROJECT
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    THIS BIOTECH FERTILIZES CROPS WITH LITTLE MICROBE CAPSULES

    Apr 19, 2019

    Agriculture is facing tough challenges in the years ahead, including a rising world population and arable land and water becoming scarcer. The traditional methods of improving food yield to match this demand chemical fertilizers and insecticides are unsustainable due to pollution and their negative ...

    LABIOTECH
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    NOVEL SYSTEM ENABLES RESEARCHERS TO STUDY BACTERIA WITHIN MINI-TISSUES IN A DISH

    Apr 19, 2019

    Engineering bacteria to intelligently sense and respond to disease states, from infections to cancer, has become a promising focus of synthetic biology. Rapid advances in genetic engineering tools have enabled researchers to "program" cells to perform various sophisticated tasks. For examp...

    NEWS-MEDICA
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    CRISPR TRIALS MOVE FROM LABS TO CLINICS: ARE WE ON THE VERGE OF RETHINKING MEDICINE?

    Apr 19, 2019

    “2019 is the year when the training wheels come off and the world gets to see what CRISPR can really do for the world in the most positive sense,” said Berkely-based gene-editing scientist Fyodor Urnov. Turns out, he wasn’t wrong. The groundbreaking CRISPR technique, that has allow...

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    CALLING OUT THE CODES IN THE TREES

    Apr 18, 2019

    In most breeding programs, the misfit plants get tossed to make room for the next generation of potential winners. But at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Appalachian Fruit Research Station in Kearneysville, West Virginia, the unusual-looking trees — plums with every branch growing s...

    GOODFRUIT
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    HOOKIPA’S €75M IPO TO FUND VACCINES FOR VIRAL INFECTION AND CANCER

    Apr 18, 2019

    The Austrian biotech Hookipa expects to raise €75M ($84M) in an IPO on the Nasdaq stock exchange to fund the phase II development of a vaccine for the virus cytomegalovirus, and the first clinical trials of its cancer vaccines. Based in Vienna, Hookipa develops vaccines based on engineered viru...


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    RESEARCHERS DEVELOP METHOD TO PREDICT SALMONELLA OUTBREAKS

    Apr 18, 2019

    University of Sydney researchers have developed a model that can predict outbreaks several months in advance, and its results come as a warning ahead of the Easter long weekend. Australia has more salmonella outbreaks than any other country in the world, with the number of cases doubling over the la...


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    BLOOD PRESSURE DRUG SHOWS PROMISE FOR TREATING PARKINSON'S AND DEMENTIA IN ANIMAL STUDY

    Apr 18, 2019

    A prescribed drug to treat high blood pressure has shown promise against conditions such as Parkinson's, Huntington's and forms of dementia in studies carried out in mice and zebrafish at the University of Cambridge. A common feature of these diseases—collectively known as neurodegener...


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    EIGHT HOURS OF INTERVAL SPRINTING CAN REVERSE NEGATIVE EFFECTS OF MENOPAUSE

    Apr 18, 2019

    A study in menopausal women found that participating in interval sprinting three times a week over two months resulted in significant health benefits. Twenty minutes of sprints on an exercise bike three times a week for eight weeks – eight hours of exercise in total – is all that's n...


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    IS IT SAFE TO USE DISPERSANTS IN OIL SPILL CLEAN UPS?

    Apr 17, 2019

    The multi-disciplinary team of scientists has issued a series of findings and recommendation on the safety of using dispersal agents in oil spill clean-up efforts in a report published in the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine.  By measuring the level of a leading dispersa...

    NEWKERALA
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    PROMINENT SUDANESE GENETICIST FREED FROM PRISON AS DICTATOR OUSTED

    Apr 17, 2019

    Muntaser Ibrahim, a leading geneticist, has been freed from prison in Sudan alongside hundreds of other civilians, including academics, who were detained in recent months for protesting against the regime of now-toppled dictator Omar al-Bashir. Their release was ordered last week by the army, which ...


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    NIGERIA: CSOS CAUTION AGAINST SCIENTISTS' CLAIM ON SAFETY OF GMOS

    Apr 16, 2019

    Abuja — Piqued by the mounting claims by scientists that Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) are safe for consumption, a coalition of Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) has cautioned Nigerians against such assertions. The coalition of 23 CSOs, at the end of the 'Seed, Food and Biosafety ...

    ALLAFRICA
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    GINKGO BIOWORKS APPOINTS FORMER BAYER CEO MARIJN DEKKERS AS CHAIRMAN OF ITS BOARD OF DIRECTORS

    Apr 16, 2019

    the organism company, today announced the appointment of Dr. Marijn Dekkers, former CEO of Bayer AG and of Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., as chairman of the board of directors and strategic advisor to the company. Dekkers brings more than 25 years of scientific and management experience in the life ...

    PRNEWSWIRE
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    NEW DEGREE FILLS A GAP IN BIOTECHNOLOGY LABOR FORCE

    Apr 16, 2019

    Southern California’s biotechnology labor force is about to get a boost from a new program at UC Riverside. The Professional Science Master’s Degree in Industrial Biotechnology will train scientists and technicians to fill highly skilled positions in the booming fields of healthcare, bio...

    NEWS.UCR.EDU
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    NUI GALWAY LAUNCH NEW RESEARCH LABORATORY TO GENERATE BIOFUELS FROM WASTE PRODUCTS

    Apr 16, 2019

    NUI Galway has officially launched a new research laboratory, featuring the latest analytical equipment to characterise biofuels produced from organic waste as well as the microbial communities which produce these fuels. Professor Piet Lens will lead a team of 25 PhD and post-doctoral researchers in...

    IRISH TECH NEWS
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    UT EXPERT CO-AUTHORS STUDY ON OIL SPILL CLEAN UP SAFETY

    Apr 16, 2019

    A UT professor and expert known for his work on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill recovery efforts has co-authored a report making a series of recommendations to federal agencies on how to safely clean up after spills. Terry Hazen, the UT–Oak Ridge National Laboratory Governor’s Chair for ...

    NEWS.UTK.EDU
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    6SENSE SECURES $27 MILLION TO ADVANCE BOLD VISION IN B2B AND ABM

    Apr 16, 2019

    6sense, a leading Account Based Orchestration Platform, powered by AI, announced $27 million in funding. The round was led by Industry Ventures and included participation from existing investors Bain Capital Ventures, Battery Ventures, Costanoa Ventures, Salesforce Ventures, and Venrock. “We b...

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    KU, HASKELL STUDENTS TO PRESENT RESEARCH PROJECTS AT 19TH ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM

    Apr 15, 2019

    Research relating to cancer, developmental genetics, microbiology, behavior in model organisms, enzymes and proteins, soils and Native American communities will be among student research presented at the 19th annual University of Kansas-Haskell Indian Nations University Undergraduate Research Sympos...

    TODAY.KU.EDU
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    SIMPLIFIED HAND SANITIZING PROTOCOL JUST AS EFFICACIOUS

    Apr 15, 2019

    A shortened 15-second application time and a simpler three-step technique for use of alcohol-based hand rub is as effective in reducing bacteria as the 30-second application and six-step technique recommended by WHO, and could improve hand hygiene compliance. The new research is being presented at t...

    TECHNOLOGYNETWORKS
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    CIDARA THERAPEUTICS SELECTS FIRST CLINICAL DEVELOPMENT CANDIDATE FROM ITS CLOUDBREAK INFLUENZA (ANTIVIRAL) PROGRAM

    Apr 15, 2019

    Cidara Therapeutics, Inc. (Nasdaq: CDTX), a biotechnology company developing novel anti-infectives including immunotherapies, today announced that the company has selected the antiviral conjugate (AVC) CB-012 as its first clinical development candidate from the company’s Cloudbreak ® influ...

    CIDARA THERAPEUTICS
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    INSIDE ARZEDA’S SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY LAB, WHERE INDUSTRIAL INGREDIENTS ARE BREWED LIKE BEER

    Apr 15, 2019

    Alexandre Zanghellini can’t help but think about what makes up the world around him. Sitting in a conference room, Zanghellini considered the paint on the walls, the table, the window shades, the plastic chairs. It’s all oil. “The entire world is made from oil. We just don’t ...

    GEEKWIRE
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    ISRAELI RESEARCHERS SUCCEED IN 3-D PRINTING AN ARTIFICIAL HEART

    Apr 15, 2019

    In a potentially a paradigm-shifting breakthrough, researchers at Tel Aviv University have succeeded in creating an artificial heart using a 3-D printer. According to Hebrew news site Mako, the experiment was the first of its kind to work. The researchers took fatty tissue from a patient, then separ...

    ALGEMEINER
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    TAKING EMBRYOLOGY FROM THE CLASSROOM TO LIFE ON THE FARM

    Apr 13, 2019

    Excitement was high at elementary schools across the county in late March as students anticipated the hatching of their baby chicks. This was the end result of a three-week long project that was a cooperative effort between Richmond County 4-H and Richmond County Schools. “Embryology in the Cl...

    YOURDAILYJOURNAL
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    GENPREX (GNPX) FEATURED IN NETWORKNEWSAUDIO BROADCAST DISCUSSING GENE THERAPY PROGRAMS ON THE CUSP OF CURING THE INCURABLE

    Apr 12, 2019

    Genprex Inc. is a clinical stage gene therapy company developing potentially life-changing technologies for cancer patients, based upon a unique proprietary technology platform, including Genprex’s initial product candidate, Oncoprex™ immunogene therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NS...

    GENPREX, INC.
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    GYROSCOPE THERAPEUTICS MERGES WITH ORBIT BIOMEDICAL CREATING A LEADING RETINAL GENE THERAPY COMPANY

    Apr 12, 2019

    Gyroscope Therapeutics (Gyroscope), a biotechnology company developing gene therapies for retinal diseases, announces its merger with Orbit Biomedical (Orbit), a medical device company focused on the precise and targeted delivery of gene and cell therapies into the retina. Under the Gyroscope name, ...

    STEVENAGE
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    THE IMPORTANCE OF SPECIALIZED RESEARCH EXPERTS IN NICHE BIOPHARMA

    Apr 12, 2019

    NEW YORK, April 12, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- The ability of a biopharmaceutical company to successfully develop experimental drug candidates is mostly dependant on the experience of their research and management teams. As such, the hiring of specialists with decades of experience can make or break futur...

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    KNOWING HOW CELLS GROW AND DIVIDE CAN LEAD TO MORE ROBUST AND PRODUCTIVE PLANTS

    Apr 12, 2019

    A large portion of a plant is hidden below the ground. This buried root system is essential for the plant: it provides stability, water, and food. In contrast to mammals, where the body plan is final at birth, the formation of new root branches ensures that the root system keeps growing throughout a...

    PHYS ORG
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    PEOPLE IN WALES LEAST AWARE POOR DIET CAN CAUSE CANCER

    Apr 12, 2019

    People in Wales are the least aware in Britain that having a poor diet increases the risk of cancer, according to a survey by the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF). The charity said after not smoking, eating a healthy diet and being physically active are the most important ways to reduce the risk of...

    ITV
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    AUSTRALIANS COULD BE IMPLANTED WITH 3D PRINTED ORGANS IN LESS THAN A DECADE

    Apr 11, 2019

    3D printing technologies are now so advanced they can create structures on a nanoscale. But how close are we to seeing 3D printed organs in the market? Professor Hala Zreiqat and Dr Peter Newman from the University of Sydney explain. From cures for cancer to fusion power and driverless cars, almost ...

    MANUFACTURERS MONTHLY
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    ASU RESEARCHERS SEE HOPE FOR AUTISM SYMPTOMS WITH FECAL TRANSPLANTS

    Apr 11, 2019

    Treating the intestinal health of children with autism with fecal transplants could improve their language and social interaction, researchers from Arizona State University have found. The findings were published this week in "Scientific Reports," an online, multidisciplinary peer-reviewed...

    AZCENTRAL
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    CURRENT BIOPRINTING PROSPECTS AND FUTURE INNOVATIONS

    Apr 10, 2019

    This new report on the topic "Current Bioprinting Prospects and Future Innovations" offers a detailed perspective on bioprinting technology, its current market and future prospects.The report provides a comprehensive analysis of the trending applications of bioprinting in the market in the...

    PR NEWS WIRE
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    EVOLUTION FROM WATER TO LAND LED TO BETTER PARENTING

    Apr 10, 2019

    The evolution of aquatic creatures to start living on land made them into more attentive parents, says new research on frogs led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath. A study by an international team of researchers, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, l...

    PHYS.ORG
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    LONG-LIVED BATS COULD HOLD SECRETS TO MAMMAL LONGEVITY

    Apr 10, 2019

    University of Maryland researchers analyzed an evolutionary tree reconstructed from the DNA of a majority of known bat species and found four bat lineages that exhibit extreme longevity. They also identified, for the first time, two life history features that predict extended life spans in bats. The...

    PHYS.ORG
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    UNDERWATER FOREST A STORE OF POTENTIAL NEW DRUGS, SHOWS STUDY

    Apr 09, 2019

    Washington D.C. [USA]: For the first time, a new study has revealed that a common species of seaweed, Laminaria Ochroleuca, is a rich source of bacteria with antimicrobial and anticancer activities - and potential new drug candidates. The research was published in Frontiers in Microbiology. Almost a...


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    NEW DNA 'SHREDDER' TECHNIQUE GOES BEYOND CRISPR'S SCISSORS

    Apr 08, 2019

    An international team has unveiled a new CRISPR-based tool that acts more like a shredder than the usual scissor-like action of CRISPR-Cas9. The new approach, based on Type I CRISPR-Cas3, is able to wipe out long stretches of DNA in human cells with programmable targeting, and has been shown to work...

    MICHIGAN MEDICINE
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    NEWLY DISCOVERED FUNCTION OF AUXIN IS OPPOSITE OF WHAT WE KNOW

    Apr 08, 2019

    Increased levels of the hormone auxin to promote cell growth in plant tissues – this is what we all know but that’s not all that Auxin’s function is. In a latest finding Chinese scientists, together with researchers from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (ISTAustria),...


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    SYNTHETIC ANTIBODY RAPIDLY PROTECTS MICE AND MONKEYS FROM ZIKA

    Apr 05, 2019

    A DNA-encoded monoclonal antibody prevents Zika infection in mice and non-human primates, researchers report April 5th in the journal Molecular Therapy. Injections of synthetic DNA encoding the potent anti-Zika monoclonal antibody ZK190 resulted in high production of ZK190 for weeks to months, effec...

    MEDICALXPRESS
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    THESE MOLECULES COULD TRAP VIRUSES INSIDE A CELL

    Apr 05, 2019

    Viruses are often used as vehicles for delivery in gene therapy because they're engineered not to damage the cell once they get there, but neglecting to consider how the virus will exit the cell could have consequences. Some viruses use a molecule called heparan sulfate to help them attach to ce...

    PHYS
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    EFFORTS TO SAVE ENDANGERED BIRDS WITH NEW BIOTECHNOLOGY BOOSTED BY $25K DONATION

    Apr 05, 2019

    A local tour company with a strong conservation mission, Hawaii Forest & Trail, has donated $25,000 to the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Biology Department to support research and technologies to reduce mosquito populations and suppress the spread of avian diseases in Hawaiʻi. “I believe w...


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    CONGRESSWOMAN DINGELL HONORED AS INNOVATOR IN BIOTECHNOLOGY

    Apr 05, 2019

    Congresswoman Debbie Dingell was recognized by the Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO) for her leadership as an Innovator in Biotechnology. Congresswoman Dingell received the award in conjunction with BIO Legislative Day Fly-In. BIO’s Innovator in Biotechnology award recognizes Members...


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    ISHARES NASDAQ BIOTECHNOLOGY ETF (IBB) HOLDINGS BOOSTED BY CASTLE ROCK WEALTH MANAGEMENT LLC

    Apr 04, 2019

    Castle Rock Wealth Management LLC grew its position in iShares Nasdaq Biotechnology ETF (NASDAQ:IBB) by 4.8% during the 4th quarter, according to the company in its most recent filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The fund owned 2,274 shares of the financial services provider&rs...

    BASEBALLDAILYDIGEST
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    ISHARES NASDAQ BIOTECHNOLOGY ETF (IBB) SHARES SOLD BY MODERA WEALTH MANAGEMENT LLC

    Apr 04, 2019

    Modera Wealth Management LLC reduced its position in iShares Nasdaq Biotechnology ETF (NASDAQ:IBB) by 6.4% in the fourth quarter, according to its most recent filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The institutional investor owned 7,192 shares of the financial services provider’s ...

    BASEBALLDAILYDIGEST
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    FDA ADVANCING BENEFICIAL ANIMAL BIOTECHNOLOGY PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

    Apr 03, 2019

    the FDA announced its Plant and Animal Biotechnology Innovation Action Plan, which focuses on the agency’s risk-based regulatory framework. This framework will help secure confidence in the safety and performance of plant and animal-based innovative products for consumers, patients, and Americ...

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    DYNE THERAPEUTICS RAISES $50M IN SERIES A FUNDING

    Apr 03, 2019

    Led by Romesh Subramanian, Ph.D., president and CEO, Dyne is developing medicines based on its proprietary product platform, which delivers nucleic acids and other molecules to skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle with precision.

    FINSMES
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    VMWARE ADVANCES HYBRID CLOUD OPERATIONS AND AUTOMATION

    Apr 03, 2019

    The new product releases  vRealize Operations 7.5, vRealize Network Insight 4.1, vRealize Automation 7.6, and vRealize Suite Lifecycle Manager 2.1  will supposedly combine to provide expanded self-driving operations and enhanced programmable provisioning capabilities across private and hyb...

    DATACENTERNEWS
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    VMWARE ADVANCES HYBRID CLOUD OPERATIONS AND AUTOMATION WITH REFRESHED VREALIZE CLOUD MANAGEMENT PLATFORM

    Apr 03, 2019

    VMware vRealize Operations delivers self-driving operations management from applications to infrastructure to optimize, plan and scale hybrid clouds including on-prem environments. It delivers continuous performance optimization based on operational and business intent, efficient capacity management...

    ALBAWABA
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    MEDIAKIND LAUNCHES CLOUD-BASED LIVE 360º VIDEO AS A SERVICE (360AAS) AT NAB SHOW 2019

    Apr 03, 2019

    MediaKind, a global media technology leader, announces the launch of its Cygnus 360º as-a-Service (360aaS) solution for live events. As part of MediaKind’s Cygnus Solution this new, innovative offering provides a cloud-based workflow for live 360º video processing and multi-platform ...

    MARTECHSERIES
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    DEUTSCHE BANK AG GROWS POSITION IN ISHARES NASDAQ BIOTECHNOLOGY ETF (IBB)

    Apr 02, 2019

    Deutsche Bank AG increased its holdings in iShares Nasdaq Biotechnology ETF (NASDAQ:IBB) by 32,925.6% in the fourth quarter, according to the company in its most recent disclosure with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The firm owned 1,683,314 shares of the financial services provider&rs...

    FAIRFIELDCURRENT
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    PUMA BIOTECHNOLOGY, INC. (PBYI)- PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT BUZZERS ON CHARTS

    Apr 02, 2019

    Puma Biotechnology, Inc. (NASDAQ:PBYI) traded under umbrella of Healthcare sector, apart from individual factors many macro and micro factors also affects in different manner to the whole sector and industries. Shares plunged -8.38% to trade at $35.54 in the last beat. By excluding these economic fa...

    NASDAQTIM
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    PUMA BIOTECHNOLOGY, INC. (PBYI)’S EPS ANALYSIS BRINGS OUT INVESTORS FROM AREA OF AMBIGUITIES WITH

    Apr 02, 2019

    Puma Biotechnology, Inc. (NASDAQ:PBYI) trying to make some eye-catching movements in term of technical analysis. One of them in these facts is earning per share growth for this year. As to cut the story short, it’s all about what a stock does that matters in eye of passive investors. In the ca...

    WALLSTREETINVESTORPLACE
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    DNA WORKSHOP PRODUCES GREAT RESULTS FOR BIOLOGY STUDENTS

    Apr 01, 2019

    A Level Biology Students at Newcastle Sixth Form College had the unique experience of studying their own DNA samples at a specially designed workshop at the International Centre for Life. Over three days, a group of 65 students from the sixth form college were invited to take part in the workshop. T...

    BDAILY
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    BANK OF AMERICA HIKES PFIZER PRICE TARGET, ESTIMATES CITING ORPHAN DRUG CATALYSTS

    Apr 01, 2019

    The analyst sees the Vyndaqel launch in cardiomyopathy as a catalyst, citing bullish feedback of KOL physicians on immediate conversion of existing U.S. patients. Long-term orphan drug launch analysis suggests scope for market expansion and in turn upside to BofA's above-consensus forecast, the ...

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    BLUEBIRD BIO GETS CHMP NOD FOR GENE THERAPY ZYNTEGLO

    Apr 01, 2019

    A European Medicines Agency advisory panel has recommended a conditional approval for Zynteglo, bluebird bio’s lead gene therapy for thalassemia, a rare blood disorder. The Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) confirmed on Friday that it had issued a positive opinion for the t...

    PHARMAPHORUM
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    GROW BIOTECH AND IPS SPECIALS ANNOUNCE JOINT VENTURE

    Apr 01, 2019

    Grow Biotech und IPS Specials haben die Gründung eines Joint Ventures beschlossen, um den einzigen vollständig lizensierten Marktzugangsplan für medizinisches Cannabis im Vereinigten Königreich anzubieten, mit dem der Zugang zu medizinischem Cannabis im Vereinigten Königreic...


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    WHAT'S IN THIS PLANT? THE BEST AUTOMATED SYSTEM FOR FINDING POTENTIAL DRUGS

    Mar 28, 2019

    Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have developed a new computational mass-spectrometry system for identifying metabolomes—entire sets of metabolites for different living organisms. When the new method was tested on select tissues from 12 plant spe...


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    NEW TOOL USES RNA SEQUENCING TO CHART RICH MAPS OF CELLULAR AND TISSUE FUNCTION

    Mar 28, 2019

    A new technique developed by scientists at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard gives an unprecedented view of the cellular organization of tissues. Known as Slide-seq, the method uses genetic sequencing to draw detailed, three-dimensional maps of tissues, revealing not only what cell types are pr...


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    IN MICE, SINGLE POPULATION OF STEM CELLS CONTRIBUTES TO LIFELONG HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS

    Mar 28, 2019

    Scientists once thought that mammals entered adulthood with all of the neurons they would ever have, but studies from the 60s found that new neurons are generated in certain parts of the adult brain and pioneering studies from the 90s helped to identify their origins and function. In the latest upda...


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    STABILIZING ENDS OF CHROMOSOMES COULD TREAT AGE-RELATED DISEASE

    Mar 28, 2019

    A study led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has uncovered a new strategy that can potentially treat age-related disease and decline. The study, published in the journal Cell Metabolism, demonstrates that shortening of telomeres the ends of the chromosomes—impairs a class of enzyme...


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    A 'DRUGGABLE' MECHANISM OF TAU PROTEIN PATHOLOGY COULD LEAD TO NEW TREATMENT FOR SOME NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES

    Mar 27, 2019

    In a great stride toward finding an effective treatment for early-stage neurodegenerative diseases, UC Santa Barbara neurobiologist Kenneth S. Kosik and collaborators have uncovered a "druggable" mechanism of pathological tau protein aggregation. For the millions of people at risk for fron...


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    RESEARCHERS ADVANCE EFFORT TO MANAGE PARASITIC ROUNDWORMS

    Mar 27, 2019

    Roundworms that feed on plants cause approximately $100 billion in annual global crop damage. Now researchers at the University of New Hampshire have made a patent-pending discovery that certain enzymes in roundworms, called nematodes, behave differently than the same enzymes in humans, with amino a...


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    RECORD-BREAKING GENE EDIT DISABLES 13,200 LINE-1 TRANSPOSONS IN A SINGLE CELL

    Mar 27, 2019

    An international team of researchers has succeeded in making 13,200 edits to a single cell—and the cell survived. In their paper uploaded to the bioRxiv preprint server, the team describes the edits they made, how they did it and why. The CRISPR gene editing technique has made headlines around...


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    BACTERIA COULD BE A FUTURE SOURCE OF ELECTRICITY

    Mar 27, 2019

    In recent years, researchers have tried to capture the electrical current that bacteria generate through metabolism. So far, however, the transfer of current from the bacteria to a receiving electrode has been highly inefficient. Now, researchers from institutions including Lund University have achi...


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    BLOOD CELLS THE MISSING LINK IN POST–EXERCISE BOOST

    Mar 26, 2019

    A discovery about how exercise improves brain function could be harnessed for research into aging and boosting learning and memory. An international team from The University of Queensland and the Dresden University of Technology has identified what triggers the boost to brain function through exerci...


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    EVIDENCE FOUND OF NEUROGENESIS IN PEOPLE UP TO AGE 87

    Mar 26, 2019

    A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Spain has found evidence of neurogenesis in the brains of people right up to old age. In their paper published in the journal Nature Medicine, the group describes their study of the brains of recently deceased people and what they found. ...


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    SCIENTISTS SHINE NEW LIGHT ON HOW CELLS COORDINATE EYE GROWTH IN FISH

    Mar 26, 2019

    New insight on how cells work together to control growth in the eyes of fish has been published today in eLife. The study suggests a system where cells in the neural retina of Japanese rice fish (also known as the medaka) give orders to cells in the retinal pigment epithelium, to ensure the eyes dev...


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    SCIENTISTS HOME IN ON MICRORNA PROCESSING FOR NOVEL CANCER THERAPIES

    Mar 25, 2019

    More than a decade of research on the mda-7/IL-24 gene has shown that it helps to suppress a majority of cancer types, and now scientists are focusing on how the gene drives this process by influencing microRNAs. Published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the...


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    MODEL LEARNS HOW INDIVIDUAL AMINO ACIDS DETERMINE PROTEIN FUNCTION

    Mar 25, 2019

    A machine-learning model from MIT researchers computationally breaks down how segments of amino acid chains determine a protein's function, which could help researchers design and test new proteins for drug development or biological research. Proteins are linear chains of amino acids, connected ...


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    ENGINEERING CELLULAR FUNCTION WITHOUT LIVING CELLS

    Mar 25, 2019

    Genes in living cells are activated – or not – by proteins called transcription factors. The mechanisms by which these proteins activate certain genes and deactivate others play a fundamental role in many biological processes. However, these mechanisms are extremely complex and scientist...


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    NEW ANGLE OF ATTACK DRIVES CELLULAR HIV-RESERVOIRS TO SELF-DESTRUCTION

    Mar 25, 2019

    While current therapies for HIV can successfully manage active infection, the virus can survive in tissue reservoirs, including macrophage cells, and remain a persistent problem. Now, Dr. David Russell, William Kaplan Professor of Infection Biology at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicin...


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    WHEN NEURONS ARE OUT OF SHAPE, ANTIDEPRESSANTS MAY NOT WORK

    Mar 22, 2019

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed medication for major depressive disorder (MDD), yet scientists still do not understand why the treatment does not work in nearly thirty percent of patients with MDD. Now, Salk Institute researchers have discovered diffe...


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    OPTICAL 'TWEEZERS' COMBINE WITH X-RAYS TO ENABLE ANALYSIS OF CRYSTALS IN LIQUIDS

    Mar 22, 2019

    Understanding how chemical reactions happen on tiny crystals in liquid solutions is central to a variety of fields, including materials synthesis and heterogeneous catalysis, but obtaining such an understanding requires that scientists observe reactions as they occur. By using coherent X-ray diffrac...


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    NEW COMPUTATIONAL TOOL COULD CHANGE HOW WE STUDY PATHOGENS

    Mar 22, 2019

    A sophisticated new analysis tool developed by Florida State University scientists may signal a new era in the study of population genetics. Their model, which incorporates advanced mathematical strategies, could help revolutionize the way researchers investigate the spread and distribution of dange...


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    ANTI-TB DRUGS CAN INCREASE RISK OF TB RE-INFECTION

    Mar 22, 2019

    Current treatments for tuberculosis (TB) are very effective in controlling TB infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). They don't, however, always prevent reinfection. Why this happens is one of the long-standing questions in TB research. So why are our bodies unable to generate per...


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    INJECTABLE BONE SCAFFOLDING MADE OF PLANT CELLULOSE

    Mar 20, 2019

    The majority of bone implants, cement, and grafts are hard objects that don’t always work well in filling the space they’re supposed to inhabit. Soft objects can gently expand and relocate their mass evenly over a volume, and they tend to be less dense so as to leave room for cells to ma...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=28902890

    RESEARCH PAVES WAY FOR NEW SOURCE FOR LEUKEMIA DRUG

    Mar 20, 2019

    Chemistry researchers at Oregon State University have patented a method for making anti-leukemia compounds that until now have only been available via an Asian tree that produces them. The synthesis of cephalotaxine and homoharringtonine (HHT) paves the way toward less-expensive, more readily availa...


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    COMPUTER SCIENTISTS CREATE PROGRAMMABLE SELF-ASSEMBLING DNA

    Mar 20, 2019

    Computer scientists at the University of California, Davis, Maynooth University in Ireland and the California Institute of Technology have created DNA molecules that can self-assemble into patterns essentially by running their own program. The work is published March 21 in the journal Nature. "...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=28922892

    CHROMATIN CHANGES RAPIDLY IN RESPONSE TO LOW OXYGEN, STUDY FINDS

    Mar 20, 2019

    A study by the University of Liverpool reveals new insights into how cells respond to oxygen deprivation. Published in the prestigious journal Science, the researchers found that chromatin, the complex of DNA and proteins where all genes reside, quickly changes in response to low oxygen. Oxygen is e...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=28932893

    PRESCRIBING HEALTHY FOOD IN MEDICARE/MEDICAID IS COST EFFECTIVE, COULD IMPROVE HEALTH

    Mar 19, 2019

    A team of researchers modeled the health and economic effects of healthy food prescriptions in Medicare and Medicaid. The study, published today in PLOS Medicine, finds that health insurance coverage to offset the cost of healthy food for Medicare and/or Medicaid participants would be highly cost-ef...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=28822882

    LINK FOUND BETWEEN TEMPERAMENT OF HIGH-RISK INFANTS AND OBESITY

    Mar 19, 2019

    Children born to mothers with gestational diabetes and who were easier to soothe as infants were at a higher risk to become obese children, according to a recent study published in JAMA Pediatrics by University at Buffalo researcher Myles S. Faith and collaborators. The study, "Association of I...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=28832883

    SQUISHING BLOOD STEM CELLS COULD FACILITATE HARVEST FOR TRANSPLANTS

    Mar 19, 2019

    Scientists at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta and Georgia Tech have found that modulating blood-forming stem cells' stiffness could possibly facilitate mobilization procedures used for stem cell-based transplants. Temporary squishiness could hel...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=28842884

    PRENATAL TESTOSTERONE LINKED TO LONG-TERM EFFECTS IN FEMALES WHO SHARE WOMB WITH MALE TWIN

    Mar 18, 2019

    Women who shared their mother's womb with a male twin are less likely to graduate from high school or college, have earned less by their early 30s, and have lower fertility and marriage rates when compared with twins who are both females, according to new Northwestern University research. In the...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=28762876

    PROTECTIVE ANTIBODIES ALSO FOUND IN PREMATURE BABIES

    Mar 18, 2019

    Even premature babies carry anti-viral antibodies transferred from the mother, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in a paper on maternal antibodies in newborns, published in the journal Nature Medicine. The results should change our approach to infection sensitivity in newborns, t...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=28772877

    MENINGITIS CHANGES IMMUNE CELL MAKEUP IN THE MOUSE BRAIN LINING

    Mar 18, 2019

    Meningitis, a group of serious diseases which infect the brain's lining, leaves its mark and can affect the body's ability to fight such infections in the future. According to a new study published in Nature Immunology, infections can have long-lasting effects on a population of meningeal im...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=28782878

    BIOSENSOR MAY PROVIDE BETTER CANCER DIAGNOSIS

    Mar 15, 2019

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have developed a new biological sensor that could help clinicians better diagnose cancer and epilepsy. Biological sensors monitor small molecules, ions, and protons and are vital as a medical diagnostic. Even the simplest signals, such as int...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=28672867

    A POSSIBLE CURE FOR RIVER BLINDNESS AND ELEPHANTIASIS

    Mar 15, 2019

    An international team of researchers has found what might be a cure for river blindness and elephantiasis. In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the group describes their search for a drug that could kill the parasitic worms behind the diseases, what they found, and...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=28682868

    LIGHT PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LINKED TO LOWER RISK OF HEART DISEASE IN OLDER WOMEN

    Mar 15, 2019

    Light physical activity such as gardening, strolling through a park, and folding clothes might be enough to significantly lower the risk of cardiovascular disease among women 63 and older, a new study has found. This kind of activity, researchers said, appears to reduce the risk of cardiovascular di...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=28692869

    PRECISION MEDICINE FOR PEDIATRIC CANCER CONSIDERING THE IMPLICATIONS FOR DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    Mar 15, 2019

    Research performed over the last several decades has led to an increased understanding of the genetics of cancer. The clinical application of this knowledge for pediatric cancer has lagged behind studies performed for adults. In a perspectives article published in the prestigious journal Science, Dr...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=28702870

    MINOR GENETIC CHANGE CREATES UNATTRACTIVE FEMALE MOTHS

    Mar 14, 2019

    Sex pheromones are chemical compounds released by an organism to attract potential mates. For months, in particular, these sex pheromones are very important for mate recognition, as they rely completely on scent signal rather than visual signals in mate attraction. However, there is still little kno...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=28592859

    BACTERIA 'TRAP' COULD HELP SLOW DOWN ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE

    Mar 14, 2019

    Scientists have developed a new and faster test for identifying how single bacteria react to antibiotics, which could help in the fight against antimicrobial resistance. Knowing how drugs impact single bacteria can help clinicians target the right antibiotics more quickly, reducing the need for prol...


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    RESEARCHERS MAKE IMPORTANT CELL DIVISION DISCOVERY

    Mar 14, 2019

    Researchers at the University of Dundee have provided important new insights into the regulation of cell division, which may ultimately lead to a better understanding of cancer progression. Cell division, also known as mitosis, is the process by which a parent cell divides into two daughter cells co...


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    USING AN ANTI-SMOKING DRUG TO CONTROL NEURONS

    Mar 14, 2019

    An anti-smoking drug now has a new job—as a chemical switch to turn select neurons on or off. The drug latches on to designer proteins, called ion channels, that control whether or not a neuron will send a message. By putting those proteins only in certain groups of neurons, scientists can tar...


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    6SENSE ANNOUNCES SALESFORCE PARDOT INTEGRATION FOR REVENUE TEAMS TO LAUNCH COMPREHENSIVE ABM PROGRAMS

    Mar 14, 2019

    6sense, a leading Account Based Orchestration Platform, powered by AI, extends its relationship with Salesforce to include an all-new integration with Pardot, Salesforce’s marketing automation solution. This integration combines marketing execution from Salesforce Pardot with the time-based pr...

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    POTENTIAL CYSTIC FIBROSIS TREATMENT USES 'MOLECULAR PROSTHETIC' FOR MISSING LUNG PROTEIN

    Mar 13, 2019

    An approved drug normally used to treat fungal infections could also do the job of a protein channel that is missing in the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis, operating as a prosthesis on the molecular scale, says new research from the University of Illinois and the University of Iowa. Cystic fib...


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    NEW CELL SUBTYPES CLASSIFIED IN MOUSE BRAIN

    Mar 13, 2019

    It's been estimated that the human brain contains roughly 100 billion neurons, together completing countless tasks through countless connections. So how do we make sense of the roles each of these neurons play? As part of the United States BRAIN Initiative, scientists from Cold Spring Harbor Lab...


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    RESEARCHERS CREATE NANO-BOT TO PROBE INSIDE HUMAN CELLS

    Mar 13, 2019

    University of Toronto Engineering researchers have built a set of magnetic 'tweezers' that can position a nano-scale bead inside a human cell in three dimensions with unprecedented precision. The nano-bot has already been used to study the properties of cancer cells and could point the way t...


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    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER SEROTONIN CAN REGULATE GENE EXPRESSION INSIDE NEURONS

    Mar 13, 2019

    The brain chemical serotonin, a neurotransmitter is long known for its role in passing signals between neurons in the brain, can also regulate expression of genes within neurons in an unexpected way, according to research conducted by neuroscientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai an...


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    SCIENTISTS DEMONSTRATE USE OF ULTRASOUND TO ALTER INFLAMMATORY AND METABOLIC RESPONSE

    Mar 12, 2019

    GE Research and Feinstein Institute for Medical Research bioelectronic medicine teams have demonstrated potentially breakthrough non-invasive methods to regulate dysfunction in the body's metabolic or inflammatory control systems using ultrasound. The findings were reported in this week's ed...


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    STUDY IDENTIFIES A 'SENSOR' THAT ACTIVATES CELL MIGRATION

    Mar 12, 2019

    The cytoskeleton is a structure that not only helps cells maintain their shape and internal organization but also enables them to perform functions like movement and migration to sites far from the place where they originated. Migration is an essential part of the spread of cancer cells to another o...


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    RESEARCHERS REPORT METRIC OF IMMUNE SYSTEM'S BIOLOGICAL CLOCK

    Mar 12, 2019

    A new study published in Nature Medicine from scientists at the Technion, Stanford, and CytoReason describes for the first time ever a way to quantify a person's "immune age." This game-changing capability provides a much more reliable predictor for the status of the immune system than...


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    SCIENTISTS FIND FIRST EVIDENCE FOR NECESSARY ROLE OF THE HUMAN HIPPOCAMPUS IN PLANNING

    Mar 12, 2019

    A team of scientists reports finding the first evidence that the human hippocampus is necessary for future planning. Its findings, published in the journal Neuron, link its long-established role in memory with our ability to use our knowledge to map out the future effects of our actions. The results...


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    GENES THAT EVOLVE FROM SCRATCH EXPAND PROTEIN DIVERSITY

    Mar 11, 2019

    One of the most important questions in biology is how rapidly new proteins evolve in organisms. Proteins are the building blocks that carry out the basic functions of life. As the genes that produce them change, the proteins change as well, introducing new functionality or traits that can eventually...


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    IBM USES MACHINE LEARNING TO DETECT EARLY ALZHEIMER’S IN BLOOD SAMPLES

    Mar 11, 2019

    Long before memory loss occurs in patients with Alzheimer’s, the protein amyloid-beta—which has been implicated in the formation of brain tangles that characterize the disease—starts building up in the spinal fluid. Problem is, detecting the protein there requires an invasive proce...


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    RESEARCHERS IDENTIFY ROLE GENDER-BIASED PROTEIN MAY PLAY IN AUTISM

    Mar 11, 2019

    Researchers at the University of New Hampshire are one step closer to helping answer the question of why autism is four times more common in boys than in girls after identifying and characterizing the connection of certain proteins in the brain to autism spectrum disorders (ASD). "Our study is ...


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    AXOVANT TRUMPETS NEW CLINICAL DATA AFTER GENE THERAPY PIVOT

    Mar 11, 2019

    Axovant has a pair of clinical readouts from its switch into gene therapy after failed endeavors in Alzheimer’s disease and the initial data look encouraging. The two studies, in Parkinson’s disease and neurodegenerative genetic disorder GM2 gangliosidosis or Tay-Sachs disease, involve a...


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    IMPROVEMENTS IN STRATIFYING COLORECTAL CANCER PATIENTS FOR PROGNOSIS

    Mar 08, 2019

    A method that integrates tumor buds, lymphocytic infiltration and their spatial relationship could better stratify patients with stage 2 colorectal cancer (CRC) at high risk for disease-specific death compared with traditional methods of clinical staging, according to results published in Cancer Imm...


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    VITAMIN D MAY PROTECT AGAINST POLLUTION-ASSOCIATED ASTHMA SYMPTOMS IN OBESE CHILDREN

    Mar 08, 2019

    A new study finds vitamin D may be protective among asthmatic obese children living in urban environments with high indoor air pollution. The study out of John Hopkins University School of Medicine, funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Insti...


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    EFFECTIVE MEDICAL TREATMENT OF GESTATIONAL DIABETES COULD REDUCE LONG-TERM COMPLICATIONS FOR THE CHILD

    Mar 08, 2019

    Researchers at Cardiff University have found that women taking metformin and/or insulin during gestational diabetes could reduce the risk of long-term complications for their child. The team discovered that the placentas of women treated with the drugs didn't exhibit DNA alterations associated w...


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    INTRAVENOUS ANTIBIOTICS TREATMENT FOR CHILDREN AT HOME AS EFFECTIVE AS HOSPITAL TREATMENT, STUDY FINDS

    Mar 08, 2019

    A Melbourne study has found intravenously administering antibiotics to children at home is as effective and safe as hospital treatment and better for their quality of life when treating a bacterial skin infection. The research, 'Efficacy and safety of intravenous ceftriaxone at home versus intra...


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    SARANAS’ TRANSCATHETER INTERNAL BLEEDING DETECTOR SCORES FDA DE NOVO CLEARANCE

    Mar 08, 2019

    Saranas has received a de novo clearance from the FDA for its Early Bird system, used to detect internal bleeding in real time during endovascular procedures. Invented at the Texas Heart Institute, the device includes a sensor-laden vascular access sheath that measures changes in electrical resistan...


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    VITAMIN B3 ANALOGUE BOOSTS PRODUCTION OF BLOOD CELLS

    Mar 07, 2019

    Stem cell-based therapies are becoming increasingly common, especially in the treatment of blood cancers like lymphoma and leukemia. In these cases, the patient's cancerous blood stem cells are removed and replaced with new, healthy ones. However, up to a quarter of cases end in death because re...


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    MAJOR MUTATION PATTERN IN CANCER OCCURS IN BURSTS

    Mar 07, 2019

    Researchers have created a huge resource for investigating the biological mechanisms that cause cancer. The scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators identified which patterns of DNA damage mutational fingerprints that represent the origins of cancer were present in over ...


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    HOW THE MICROBIOTA CONTROLS NEUTROPHIL ACTIVITY

    Mar 07, 2019

    A host protein called Serum Amyloid A (Saa) is a major factor mediating the effects of the microbiota on the function of immune cells called neutrophils, according to a study published March 7 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by John Rawls of Duke University School of Medicine, and colleagu...


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    LARGEST-EVER STUDY IDENTIFIES GENE REGIONS ASSOCIATED WITH SLEEP DURATION

    Mar 07, 2019

    A study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the University of Exeter Medical School has identified 76 new gene regions associated with sleep duration. The study by a team that recently reported finding gene sites associated with insomnia risk and chronotype - the tende...


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    'UNDRUGGABLE' PARKINSON'S MOLECULE SPILLS ITS SECRETS

    Mar 07, 2019

    UC San Francisco researchers have for the first time developed a strategy for targeting a key molecule implicated in Parkinson's disease, opening up a potential new treatment strategy for the currently incurable movement disorder. "This molecule is widely regarded as one of the top therapeu...


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    SCIENTISTS IDENTIFY GENETIC FACTORS THAT MAY CAUSE SOME PEOPLE TO BECOME OBESE

    Mar 06, 2019

    Obesity is a major public health problem in the United States and around the world, with an estimated 650 million people suffering from the condition. One of the biggest challenges of this ever-worsening condition is figuring out why people become obese in the first place, and why some people are mo...


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    MOLECULAR CONNECTION BETWEEN NUTRIENT AVAILABILITY AND EMBRYONIC GROWTH IDENTIFIED

    Mar 06, 2019

    The union of an ovule and a spermatozoon initiates a complex cell division process that will ultimately yield a new living being. In fact, all the body's cells come from embryonic stem cells that must divide in a controlled and exact fashion to give rise to proper organ and tissue formation in t...


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    MOLECULAR PUZZLE REVEALS UNKNOWN STAGES OF FETAL DEVELOPMENT

    Mar 06, 2019

    By applying gene analysis to individual cells from early mouse embryos, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered previously unknown cellular stages of fetal development from fertilized egg to living being. The study is published in the scientific journal Cell Reports. All over ...


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    SCIENTISTS IDENTIFY GENE PARTNERSHIPS THAT PROMOTE SPINAL CORD REGENERATION

    Mar 06, 2019

    Researchers are one step closer to solving the mystery of why some vertebrates can regenerate their spinal cords while others, including humans, create scar tissue after spinal cord injury, leading to lifelong damage. Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have identified gene "pa...


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    ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUG IS THE KEY TO BOOSTING CARDIAC REPROGRAMMING

    Mar 06, 2019

    Once damaged, the human heart does a poor job of repairing itself, and is thus a key priority for treating heart failure. One way of restoring cardiac function is to reprogram non-cardiac body cells such as fibroblasts into heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) using a collection of cardiac transcript...


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    DIRECTIVE RANKS #1 IN CLUTCH’S TOP B2B MARKETING SERVICE PROVIDERS

    Mar 06, 2019

    Directive, the leading B2B and enterprise search marketing agency, has recently been honored as the number one B2B marketing and advertising service provider in Los Angeles, according to Clutch. Clutch is a B2B research, ratings and reviews site that identifies leading IT and marketing service provi...

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    BACTERIA-KILLING GLASS OFFERS HOPE IN FIGHT AGAINST HOSPITAL INFECTIONS

    Mar 05, 2019

    Scientists at Aston University have discovered a technique similar to medieval stained glass-making that can completely eradicate the deadliest hospital infections within hours. Using a so-called bioactive phosphate glass containing small amounts of the metallic element cobalt, the researchers were ...


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    SECOND HIV REMISSION PATIENT REKINDLES CURE HOPE

    Mar 05, 2019

    For just the second time ever an HIV patient is in sustained remission from the virus in what was hailed by experts Tuesday as proof that the AIDS-causing condition could one day be curable. Ten years almost to the day since the first confirmed case of an HIV-infected person being rid of the deadly ...


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    HARNESSING SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY TO CO-PRODUCE HIGH-VALUE TERPENOID BIOMATERIALS AND BIOFUEL IN PLANTS

    Mar 05, 2019

    Michigan State University scientists have developed synthetic biology tools to co-produce high-value compounds in plants. The study is published today in the journal Nature Communications. Terpenoids from the largest class of natural products in plants and have been used by humans for thousands of y...


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    BREAST CANCER CELLS RELY ON PYRUVATE TO EXPAND IN NEW TISSUES

    Mar 05, 2019

    Most patients who die of breast cancer die of metastasis, the process by which cancer cells spread to other organs of the body. Cancer cells alter their metabolism to grow and expand across other organs. A new study by Prof. Sarah-Maria Fendt from the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology and her ...


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    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE DIGITALLY STAINS TISSUE SAMPLES USED IN PATHOLOGY, SAVING LABOR, TIME AND COST

    Mar 05, 2019

    Histopathology is one of the main methods used for diagnosis of disease. Following a medical screening process, a patient can undergo a biopsy, in which a piece of tissue is removed for further inspection and diagnostic analysis. This tissue specimen is then sliced into thin sections that are on the...


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    GLOBAL MAPS ENABLING TARGETED INTERVENTIONS TO REDUCE BURDEN OF MOSQUITO-BORNE DISEASE

    Mar 04, 2019

    Now, with an unprecedented level of accuracy, an international team of researchers, led by Dr. Moritz Kramer at the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology, have used statistical mapping techniques to predict where the species will spread over an immediate, medium and long-term time-scale. ...


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    WHEN IT COMES TO HEARING WORDS, IT'S A DIVISION OF LABOR BETWEEN OUR BRAIN'S TWO HEMISPHERES

    Mar 04, 2019

    Scientists have uncovered a new "division of labor" between our brain's two hemispheres in how we comprehend the words and other sounds we hear—a finding that offers new insights into the processing of speech and points to ways to address auditory disorders. "Our findings po...


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    POTENTIAL TREATMENT STRATEGY UNCOVERED FOR PANCREATIC CANCER

    Mar 04, 2019

    Scientists at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center discovered a technique to make pancreatic cancer cells reliant on one energy source and then starve them of it—a finding that has led to clinical studies of a novel treatment strategy for one of the deadliest...


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    SWIMMING MICROBES STEER THEMSELVES INTO MATHEMATICAL ORDER

    Mar 04, 2019

    Freeing thousands of microorganisms to swim in random directions in an infinite pool of liquid may not sound like a recipe for order, but eventually, the swarm will go with its own flow. Theoretical modeling led by the University of Wisconsin–Madison applied mathematician Saverio Spagnolie sho...


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    CHANDELIER NEURON REQUIRES 'VELCRO-LIKE' MOLECULE TO FORM CONNECTIONS

    Mar 04, 2019

    As a brain grows, the neurons within it establish themselves, forming lasting connections with their neighbors. They're creating the vast cell networks that ensure a mind and body run smoothly. Now, researchers have determined how a crucial kind of neuron called a chandelier cell (ChC) forms con...


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    SURVIVOR ANTIBODY CLEARS PATH FOR NEW EBOLA VACCINE

    Mar 04, 2019

    An antibody taken from an Ebola survivor has been found to target all three human strains of the virus and could eventually lead to an all-purpose vaccine against the killer disease, scientists said Monday. Ebola, which can be lethal in 90 percent of cases if untreated, killed more than 11,000 peopl...


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    TWO GENES EXPLAIN VARIATION IN COLOR AND BEHAVIOR IN THE WALL LIZARD

    Mar 01, 2019

    How are reptiles capable of generating such a diversity of bright colors? And how is it possible that within a single population of the same species, different individuals exhibit strikingly different coloration patterns? In a new paper published in the journal PNAS an international team of scientis...


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    CELLS USE SUGARS TO COMMUNICATE AT THE MOLECULAR LEVEL

    Mar 01, 2019

    The human body is made up of 30 to 40 million cells, a large and complex network of blood cells, neurons, and specialized cells that make up organs and tissues. Until now, figuring out which mechanisms control communication between them has proven a significant challenge for the field of cell biolog...


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    HIGH-FAT DIET CAUSES THICKENING OF ARTERIES DOWN TO THE CELLULAR LEVEL

    Mar 01, 2019

    Atherosclerosis is a tough problem—arteries get thicker and stiffer, which can lead to heart disease and stroke, but it is not known precisely how cholesterol causes this thickening. Cholesterol is a tiny fat molecule that circulates in our bloodstream with the help of lipoproteins. High level...


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    NEW X-RAY MEASUREMENT APPROACH COULD IMPROVE CT SCANNERS

    Mar 01, 2019

    A new measurement approach proposed by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) could lead to a better way to calibrate computed tomography (CT) scanners, potentially streamlining patient treatment by improving communication among doctors. The approach, detailed in a r...


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    TOWARD A BLOOD TEST FOR EARLY-STAGE LIVER DISEASE

    Mar 01, 2019

    One in four people in Western and Asian societies develop a build-up of fat in the liver as a result of an unhealthy diet. This disease – referred to as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) – causes no symptoms initially but can develop into end-stage liver cirrhosis with limited tr...


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    BACTERIA IN FROG SKIN MAY HELP FIGHT FUNGAL INFECTIONS IN HUMANS

    Mar 01, 2019

    In the past few decades, a lethal disease has decimated populations of frogs and other amphibians worldwide, even driving some species to extinction. Yet other amphibians resisted the epidemic. Based on previous research, scientists at the INDICASAT AIP, Smithsonian and collaborating institutions kn...


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    TOOL REVEALS MOLECULAR CAUSES OF DISEASE, INCLUDING INFANT CANCER

    Mar 01, 2019

    Princeton University researchers are gaining new insights into the causes and characteristics of diseases by harnessing machine learning to analyze molecular patterns across hundreds of diseases simultaneously. Demonstrating a new tool now available to researchers worldwide, the team of computer sci...


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    TOOL REVEALS MOLECULAR CAUSES OF DISEASE, INCLUDING INFANT CANCER

    Mar 01, 2019

    Princeton University researchers are gaining new insights into the causes and characteristics of diseases by harnessing machine learning to analyze molecular patterns across hundreds of diseases simultaneously. Demonstrating a new tool now available to researchers worldwide, the team of computer sci...


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    RESEARCHERS IDENTIFY HOW METABOLITES TARGET BRAIN-HOMING IMMUNE CELLS TO TREAT MS

    Feb 28, 2019

    Understanding and mitigating the role of epigenetics (environmental influences that trigger changes in gene expression) in disease development is a major goal of researchers. Now, a newly published paper featured on the March cover of the journal Brain adds significantly to this work by detailing ho...


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    HOW FUNGI INFLUENCE GLOBAL PLANT COLONISATION

    Feb 28, 2019

    The symbiosis of plants and fungi has a great influence on the worldwide spread of plant species. In some cases, it even acts as a filter. This has been discovered by an international team of researchers with participation from the University of Göttingen. The results appeared in the journal Na...


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    HOW PROSTATE CANCER BECOMES TREATMENT RESISTANT

    Feb 28, 2019

    The development of effective anti-androgen therapies for prostate cancer is a major scientific advance. However, some men who receive these targeted treatments are more likely to develop a deadly treatment-resistant prostate cancer subtype called neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC). No effective t...


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    BIOFUNCTIONALIZED CERAMICS FOR CRANIAL BONE DEFECT REPAIR – IN VIVO STUDY

    Feb 28, 2019

    Advances in materials science and production technology have enabled bone tissue engineering (BTE) strategies that generate complex scaffolds with controlled architecture for bone repair. The novel biomaterials can be further functionalized with bioactive molecules for biocompatibility by enhancing ...


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    GENE ACTIVITY IN DEFENDERS DEPENDS ON INVADING SLAVEMAKING ANTS

    Feb 28, 2019

    Temnothorax americanus is a slavemaking ant found in northeastern America. These tiny social insects neither rear their offspring nor search for food themselves. Instead, they raid nests of another ant species, Temnothorax longispinosus, kidnap their larvae and pupae to bring these back to their own...


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    AN ATLAS OF AN AGGRESSIVE LEUKEMIA

    Feb 28, 2019

    A team of researchers led by Bradley Bernstein at the Ludwig Center at Harvard has used single-cell technologies and machine learning to create a detailed "atlas of cell states" for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that could help improve treatment of aggressive cancer. AML is characterized by...


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    HAPPY IN MARRIAGE? GENETICS MAY PLAY A ROLE

    Feb 28, 2019

    People fall in love for many reasons—similar interests, physical attraction, and shared values among them. But if they marry and stay together, their long-term happiness may depend on their individual genes or those of their spouse, says a new study led by Yale School of Public Health research...


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    'MUTATION HOTSPOT' ALLOWS COMMON FUNGUS TO ADAPT TO DIFFERENT HOST ENVIRONMENTS

    Feb 28, 2019

    The fungus Candida albicans is found in the gastrointestinal tract of about half of healthy adults with little if any effect, yet it also causes an oft-fatal blood infection among patients with compromised immune systems, including those with HIV/AIDS. New research from Brown University helps show h...


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    RESEARCHERS 'BAIT' PATHOLOGICAL PROTEINS UNDERLYING MANY NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS

    Feb 27, 2019

    A single misbehaving protein—called TDP-43—is behind 97 percent of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases and 45 percent of frontotemporal dementia diagnoses. It also is found in 80 percent of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and 60 percent of Alzheimer's disease cases. Now, Unive...


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    TURNING STEM CELLS INTO BONE WITH NANOCLAY-REINFORCED HYDROGEL

    Feb 27, 2019

    Assistant Professor Alireza Dolatshahi-Pirouz and colleagues have developed a hydrogel that combines synthetic materials with living cells and can turn stem cells into bone without adding external growth or differentiation factors. More than 50 percent of women and 20 percent of men over the age of ...


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    MOTHER'S BEHAVIORAL CORRECTIONS TUNE INFANT'S BRAIN TO ANGRY TONE

    Feb 27, 2019

    The same brain network that adults use when they hear angry vocalizations is at work in infants as young as six months old, an effect that is strongest in infants whose mothers spend the most time controlling their behavior, according to a new study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Chen Zhao o...


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    MONITORING THE SYNTHESIS OF THE BACTERIAL CELL WALL IN REAL TIME

    Feb 27, 2019

    A significant breakthrough has just been made in the world of biochemistry: a team of international researchers has developed a revolutionary method to monitor in real time an essential element of bacterial growth. Since the new technique allows the cell wall of bacteria to be fluorescently "st...


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    YEAST PRODUCE LOW-COST, HIGH-QUALITY CANNABINOIDS

    Feb 27, 2019

    University of California, Berkeley, synthetic biologists have engineered brewer's yeast to produce marijuana's main ingredients mind-altering THC and non-psychoactive CBD as well as novel cannabinoids not found in the plant itself. Feeding only on sugar, the yeast is an easy and cheap way to...


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    IDENTIFICATION OF GENES RESPONSIBLE FOR SOUR TASTE IN CITRUS FRUIT MAY ENABLE THE CREATION OF NEW, SWEETER VARIETIES

    Feb 27, 2019

    A team of researchers, including two from the University of California, Riverside, has identified the genes responsible for the hallmark sour taste of many citrus fruits. Published Tuesday, Feb. 25 in Nature Communications, the research could help plant breeders develop new, sweeter varieties. Moder...


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    MUSCLE GENE MUTATIONS IMPLICATED IN HUMAN NASAL/SINUS CANCER

    Feb 27, 2019

    By sequencing the entire genomes of tumor cells from six people with a rare cancer of the nose and sinus cavity, Johns Hopkins researchers report they unexpectedly found the same genetic change¾one in a gene involved in muscle formation¾in five of the tumors. "In terms of research...


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    RESEARCHERS FIND THE IMMUNE SYSTEM'S UNKNOWN MESSENGER

    Feb 26, 2019

    Researchers can now explain how a cell that is being attacked by bacteria or viruses specifically manages to 'sound the alarm' among its neighboring cells so they can react with a quick response. "We've succeeded in finding and describing a messenger which both quickly and effective...


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    NEW METHOD USES AI TO SCREEN FOR FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDER

    Feb 26, 2019

    Scientists at the University of Southern California (USC), Queen's University (Ontario) and Duke University have developed a new tool that can screen children for fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) quickly and affordable, making it accessible to more children in remote locations worldwide. T...


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    OXYGEN-TRACKING METHOD COULD IMPROVE DIABETES TREATMENT

    Feb 26, 2019

    Transplanting pancreatic islet cells into patients with diabetes is a promising alternative to the daily insulin injections that many of these patients now require. These cells could act as a bioartificial pancreas, monitoring blood glucose levels and secreting insulin when needed. For this kind of ...


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    HOW OUR TISSUES MANAGE MECHANICAL STRESS

    Feb 26, 2019

    When running, breathing and moving, the body is continuously deforming. How do the tissues in the body deal with all these mechanical stresses? Publishing today in Nature Physics, researchers from Wageningen University & Research (WUR) and AMOLF institute show how the two principal components of...


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    BETTER TOGETHER: MITOCHONDRIAL FUSION SUPPORTS CELL DIVISION

    Feb 26, 2019

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell. And for mitochondria, much like for double-header engines stacked together in a steam train, working in multiples has its benefits. New research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that when cells divide rapidly, their mitochondria are fused to...


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    INHIBITING CANCER-CAUSING PROTEIN COULD PREVENT SCLERODERMA FIBROSIS

    Feb 26, 2019

    A protein known to play a role in cancer may also be increasing fibrosis in scleroderma patients. Scleroderma, a rare, chronic autoimmune disease, is marked by hardening of the skin and internal organs. Symptoms often include pain, stiffness, fatigue and breathing difficulties. "The disease cre...


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    RESEARCHERS FIND POND BACTERIA GROWS FASTER DURING THE DAY, SUGGEST A GENETIC EXPLANATION

    Feb 26, 2019

    Some of the bacteria that live in ponds, lakes and other freshwater environments grow faster during the day, even though they don't take in sunlight as an energy source, according to researchers at the University of Delaware. Special genes that absorb light could possibly explain this increased ...


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    COMMON VIRUS IS 'LESS PRONE TO MUTATION' GIVING HOPE FOR VACCINE DEVELOPMENT

    Feb 25, 2019

    One of the commonest causes of congenital disability, the Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV), is less prone to mutation than previously thought, a finding which could help develop a successful vaccine, UCL researchers have found. HCMV, a DNA virus, and type of herpes virus is one of the world's most c...


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    RESEARCH TEAM ERADICATES HEPATITIS C IN PATIENTS AFTER HEART TRANSPLANTS FROM INFECTED DONORS

    Feb 25, 2019

    Nine patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving heart transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease, according to a study published in the American Journal of Transplantation. The results highlight the potential for expanding t...


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    SCIENTISTS UNCOVER GENETIC ROADMAP OF CULTIVATED STRAWBERRY

    Feb 25, 2019

    Consumers want strawberries to be red, sweet, ripe and juicy like those fresh picked from a garden. Suppliers want them to be easy to handle and ship, without getting squished. Commercial strawberry growers need their crops to be high-yielding and disease-resistant. An international team of scientis...


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    NEW CLUES ABOUT WHY NON-SMOKERS, AS WELL AS SMOKERS, DEVELOP CHRONIC LUNG DISEASE REVEALED

    Feb 25, 2019

    The new study, published in Nature Genetics, shows that genetic differences help explain why some people who have never smoked develop the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and why some smokers are at higher risk of getting the disease than other smokers. During the two-year study, resea...


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    LIGHT-DRIVEN SIGNALING OF BACTERIA MAY PROVIDE CLUES TO DEFEAT DANGEROUS INFECTIONS

    Feb 25, 2019

    From the complex to the simple, all life forms have mechanisms for translating environmental cues into cellular behavior that helps them survive. This universal activity may hold the key to understanding how common bacteria transform into virulent, deadly infections in humans, but the multifaceted p...


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    SCIENTISTS LAY FOUNDATION FOR SINGLE-CELL LEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF DNA REPLICATION

    Feb 25, 2019

    A research team has established a novel method to scrutinize DNA replication in individual cells. This method allowed them to obtain a detailed genome-wide view of replicated and unreplicated sequence distribution in each cell. They also succeeded in discriminating paternally and maternally derived ...


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    ARTIFICIAL LUNG CANCER TISSUE COULD HELP FIND NEW DRUG TREATMENTS

    Feb 25, 2019

    A 3-D hydrogel created by researchers in U of T Engineering Professor Molly Shoichet's lab is helping University of Ottawa researchers to quickly screen hundreds of potential drugs for their ability to fight highly invasive cancers. Cell invasion is a critical hallmark of metastatic cancers, suc...


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    OUTFITTING T CELL RECEPTORS TO COMBAT A WIDESPREAD AND SOMETIMES DEADLY VIRUS

    Feb 22, 2019

    Researchers have engineered "antibody-like" T cell receptors that can specifically stick to cells infected with cytomegalovirus, or CMV, a virus that causes lifelong infection in more than half of all adults by age 40. These receptors represent a new potential treatment option, could aid t...


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    NEW MRI SENSOR CAN IMAGE ACTIVITY DEEP WITHIN THE BRAIN

    Feb 22, 2019

    Calcium is a critical signaling molecule for most cells, and it is especially important in neurons. Imaging calcium in brain cells can reveal how neurons communicate with each other; however, current imaging techniques can only penetrate a few millimeters into the brain. MIT researchers have now dev...


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    OLDER BIOLOGIC AGE LINKED TO ELEVATED BREAST CANCER RISK

    Feb 22, 2019

    Biologic age, a DNA-based estimate of a person's age, is associated with future development of breast cancer, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health. Biologic age was determined by measuring DNA methylation, a chemical modification to DNA that is part of the normal aging pr...


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    FAILURE TO TAKE STATINS LEADS TO HIGHER MORTALITY RATES

    Feb 22, 2019

    Patients who took statins less than 70 percent of the time had a 20 percent increase in mortality compared with those taking them at least 90 percent of the time, a Stanford study found. A lot of patients with arteries clogged by cholesterol aren't taking their statins, a new study by researcher...


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    TRICLOSAN ADDED TO CONSUMER PRODUCTS IMPAIRS RESPONSE TO ANTIBIOTIC TREATMENT

    Feb 22, 2019

    Grocery store aisles are stocked with products that promise to kill bacteria. People snap up those items to protect themselves from the germs that make them sick. However, new research from Washington University in St. Louis finds that a chemical that is supposed to kill bacteria is actually making ...


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    RESEARCHERS CREATE ORGANOID OF A BRAIN REGION TO STUDY COGNITIVE DISORDERS

    Feb 22, 2019

    In a lab dish, Yale researchers modeled two brain structures and their interactions to shed light on the origins of neuropsychiatric diseases. In-Hyun Park, associate professor of genetics, and his team created an organoid of the thalamus, a major hub that integrates sensory information and relays i...


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    VANDERBILT COLLABORATION YIELDS PROMISING COMPOUND TO TREAT ARRHYTHMIA

    Feb 22, 2019

    A collaboration between Vanderbilt University professors of chemistry and medicine yielded a promising compound to treat arrhythmia from an unlikely place: the fungal natural product verticilide. Jeffrey Johnston, Stevenson Professor of Chemistry, said the natural product isn't active except in ...


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    INTUITIVE SURGICAL RELEASES ION ROBOTIC LUNG BIOPSY SYSTEM

    Feb 21, 2019

    Intuitive Surgical, the firm that makes the popular da Vinci surgical robotic systems, won FDA clearance and is releasing a robotic lung biopsy system called Ion in the United States. The catheter-based device allows precise penetration and sampling of tissues deep within the lungs. The catheter is ...


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    BAT INFLUENZA VIRUSES COULD INFECT HUMANS

    Feb 21, 2019

    Bats don't only carry the deadly Ebola virus but are also a reservoir for a new type of influenza virus. These newly discovered flu viruses could potentially also attack the cells of humans and livestock, researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown. Seasonal outbreaks of the flu are c...


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    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER HOW BLOOD VESSELS PROTECT THE BRAIN DURING INFLAMMATION

    Feb 21, 2019

    Researchers from the University of British Columbia have discovered how blood vessels protect the brain during inflammation a finding that could lead to the development of new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases such as stroke, epilepsy, and multiple sclerosis. In a study published today in th...


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    BACTERIA CAN SURVIVE STARVATION IN ZOMBIE MODE

    Feb 21, 2019

    Bacteria that are exposed to a hostile environment, for example with antibiotics or very few nutrients, can sometimes survive by 'going to sleep." Biologists from the University of Amsterdam (UvA) have discovered an unknown, alternative survival strategy: a kind of zombie mode, in which the...


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    T-CELL SPECIFICITY FOUND TO PLAY A ROLE IN ATTACKS ON MYELIN VERSUS Β-SYNUCLEIN IN MS

    Feb 21, 2019

    A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in Germany has found that T-cell specificity plays a major role in immune system attacks on myelin versus β-synuclein in people with multiple sclerosis. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their study of...


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    WHAT PLANT PROTEINS CAN TELL US ABOUT ALZHEIMER'S

    Feb 20, 2019

    Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia are a growing burden on society and a leading cause of death among the elderly. There is no cure. Salt from rising water tables and seawater intrusions are increasingly affecting crop production around the world. It's estimated that up to 50 pe...

    UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE
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    NEW INSIGHT ON POTENT HIV ANTIBODY COULD IMPROVE VACCINE DESIGN

    Feb 20, 2019

    In the quest to develop an effective HIV vaccine, researchers have focused attention on identifying and targeting the region of the virus's outer envelope where a lineage of antibodies are able to dock and neutralize the virus. But true to form with HIV, these broadly neutralizing antibodies, or...


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    RESEARCHERS DEFINE CELLS USED IN BONE REPAIR

    Feb 20, 2019

    Research led by Johns Hopkins investigators has uncovered the roles of two types of cells found in the vessel walls of fat tissue and described how these cells may help speed bone repair. The study found that one of these perivascular stem cell types, pericytes, induces growth of new blood vessels, ...

    JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
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    VIGOROUS EXERCISE, FASTING, HORMONES IMPROVE ELIMINATION OF TOXIC, MISFOLDED, UNNECESSARY PROTEINS IN MOUSE, HUMAN CELLS

    Feb 20, 2019

    The body's ability to adapt to changing conditions and shifting physiologic demands is essential to survival. To do so, each cell must be able to dispose of damaged or unnecessary proteins a quality-control mechanism critical for cellular performance and for the health of the entire organism. No...


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    VIRUSES THAT LINGER IN THE GUT COULD TRIGGER TYPE 1 DIABETES

    Feb 20, 2019

    Researchers at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, provide new evidence supporting an association between elevated levels of enteroviruses in the intestinal tracts of children...


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    USING CRYSTALS TO UNPACK HOW VIRUSES WORK

    Feb 19, 2019

    Researchers at Cardiff University have used X-ray crystallography and computer simulation to get a closer look at how viruses bind cells and cause infection. The new insight could help in the development of drugs and therapies for infections and further advance the exploitation of viruses for medica...


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    NOVEL GENE THERAPY APPROACH CREATES NEW ROUTE TO TACKLE RARE, INHERITED DISEASES

    Feb 19, 2019

    Nonsense mutations are single-letter errors in the genetic code that prematurely halt the production of critical proteins. These unfinished proteins are unable to function normally, and nonsense mutations cause 10-15 percent of all inherited genetic diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, s...


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    STUDY FINDS LOW STATIN USE AMONG SOME HIGH-RISK KIDNEY DISEASE PATIENTS

    Feb 19, 2019

    Clinical trials have shown that cholesterol-lowering statin drugs can significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in kidney disease patients who are not on dialysis. But a new study has found that statins are used by only 21.8 percent of such patients who do not already have cardiovascul...


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    RESEARCHERS DEVELOP NEW ONE-TWO PUNCH AGAINST MELANOMA IN MOUSE MODEL

    Feb 19, 2019

    Researchers at the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy at Johns Hopkins and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine report two new forms of an older anti-cancer agent they developed appear to enhance the immune system's ability to fight melanoma in mice. The agents, dubbe...


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    SCIENTISTS REVEAL HOW 3-D ARRANGEMENT OF DNA HELPS PERPETUATE THE SPECIES

    Feb 18, 2019

    From fathers to children, the delivery of hereditary information requires the careful packing of DNA in sperm. But just how nature packages this DNA to prepare offspring isn't clear. Using new technology to reveal the 3-D organization of DNA in maturing male reproductive cells, scientists reveal...


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    HOW OUR PLANTS HAVE TURNED INTO THIEVES TO SURVIVE

    Feb 18, 2019

    Scientists have discovered that grasses are able to short cut evolution by taking genes from their neighbors. The findings suggest wild grasses are naturally genetically modifying themselves to gain a competitive advantage. Understanding how this is happening may also help scientists reduce the risk...


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    GREAT WHITE SHARK GENOME DECODED

    Feb 18, 2019

    The great white shark is one of the most recognized marine creatures on Earth, generating widespread public fascination and media attention, including spawning one of the most successful movies in Hollywood history. This shark possesses notable characteristics, including its massive size (up to 20 f...


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    STUDY SHOWS THAT GLIOBLASTOMA PATIENTS SURVIVE SIGNIFICANTLY LONGER WITH COMBINATION CHEMOTHERAPY

    Feb 18, 2019

    Cancer researchers at the University of Bonn have reported significant progress in the treatment of glioblastoma. About one-third of all patients suffer from a particular variant of this most common and aggressive brain tumor. Survival of these patients treated with the new combination therapy incre...


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    BLOOD CLOT DISCOVERY COULD PAVE WAY FOR TREATMENT OF BLOOD DISEASES

    Feb 15, 2019

    Scientists have discovered new ways in which the body regulates blood clots, in a discovery which could one day lead to the development of better treatments that could help prevent and treat conditions including heart diseases, stroke, and vascular dementia. Led by the University of Exeter and funde...


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    TCR2 IPO HITS MIDPOINT, SETTING STAGE FOR TRIALS OF CAR-T RIVALS

    Feb 15, 2019

    TCR2 Therapeutics has priced its IPO at the midpoint of the target range. The offering stands to net TCR2 $67 million, setting it up to move cell therapies designed to better CAR-Ts through early-phase development. Massachusetts-based TCR2 has reached the cusp of clinical development fueled by $125 ...


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    BIOLOGISTS IDENTIFY HONEYBEE 'CLEAN' GENES KNOWN FOR IMPROVING SURVIVAL

    Feb 15, 2019

    The key to breeding disease-resistant honeybees could lie in a group of genes known for controlling hygienic behavior that enables colonies to limit the spread of harmful mites and bacteria, according to genomics research conducted at York University. Some worker honeybees detect and remove sick and...


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    PATIENTS' OWN CELLS COULD BE THE KEY TO TREATING CROHN'S DISEASE

    Feb 15, 2019

    A new technique using patients' own modified cells to treat Crohn's disease has been proven to be effective in experiments using human cells, with a clinical trial of the treatment expected to start in the next six months. Researchers at the NIHR Guy's and St Thomas' Biomedical Resea...


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    TESTS SUGGEST SCIENTISTS ACHIEVED FIRST 'IN BODY' GENE EDITING

    Feb 07, 2019

    Scientists think they have achieved the first gene editing inside the body, altering DNA in adults to try to treat a disease, although it's too soon to know if this will help. Preliminary results suggest that two men with a rare disorder now have a corrective gene at very low levels, which may n...


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    NEW TECHNIQUE PINPOINTS MILESTONES IN THE EVOLUTION OF BACTERIA

    Feb 07, 2019

    Bacteria have evolved all manner of adaptations to living in every habitat on Earth. But unlike plants and animals, which can be preserved as fossils, bacteria have left behind little physical evidence of their evolution, making it difficult for scientists to determine exactly when different groups ...


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    LAB DISCOVERS HOW THE IMMUNE SYSTEM 'THINKS'

    Feb 07, 2019

    New research from the laboratory of cancer scientist Dr. Tak Mak, renowned for cloning the human T-cell receptor, has demonstrated that immune cells make brain chemicals to fight off infections. The first proof-of-function findings, published online today in the journal Science, solve a puzzle scien...


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    SIMPLE DRUG COMBINATION CREATES NEW NEURONS FROM NEIGHBORING CELLS

    Feb 07, 2019

    A simple drug cocktail that converts cells neighboring damaged neurons into functional new neurons could potentially be used to treat stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and brain injuries. A team of researchers at Penn State identified a set of four, or even three, molecules that could convert glial c...


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    GLADSTONE INSTITUTES’ ROBERT MAHLEY LAUNCHES ALZHEIMER’S BIOTECH GABAERON

    Feb 06, 2019

    Robert Mahley, founder, and president of Gladstone Institutes, an internationally-recognized expert on heart disease, cholesterol metabolism and Alzheimer’s disease, is launching a biotech company to focus on Alzheimer’s disease. The company is called GABAeron. Gladstone Institutes is af...


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    NEWLY DISCOVERED IMMUNE CELLS PLAY ROLE IN INFLAMMATORY BRAIN DISEASES

    Feb 06, 2019

    A team of researchers under the direction of the Medical Center—University of Freiburg has observed in an animal model that previously unknown types of immune cells are present in the inflamed brain in the course of multiple sclerosis (MS). The discovery was made through a new, high-resolution...


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    NEW COMPUTER PROGRAM AIMS TO REDUCE DNA CONTAMINATION IN MICROBIAL SAMPLES

    Feb 06, 2019

    DNA sequencing of microbial samples can give researchers and medical professionals a wealth of information about microbiomes – the communities of microorganisms that inhabit our bodies and the environments all around us. Understanding the microbiome can aid our understanding of what ails us an...


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    NEW ANTI-CRISPR PROTEINS DISCOVERED IN SOIL AND HUMAN GUT

    Feb 06, 2019

    Scientists from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability (DTU) have found four new anti-CRISPR proteins that are distributed across different environments. The new study published in Cell Host & Microbe suggests that some anti-CRISPR proteins are more widespread in nature than pr...


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    A BETTER WAY TO MEASURE CELL SURVIVAL

    Feb 05, 2019

    Measuring the toxic effects of chemical compounds on different types of cells is critical for developing cancer drugs, which must be able to kill their target cells. Analyzing cell survival is also an important task in fields such as environmental regulation, to test industrial and agricultural chem...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26282628

    HIV-1 PROTEIN SUPPRESSES IMMUNE RESPONSE MORE BROADLY THAN THOUGHT

    Feb 05, 2019

    Scientists have revealed how a protein produced by HIV-1 plays a broader role in suppressing the immune system's response to infection than previously thought. Their findings could help inform more effective treatment strategies for HIV, including those aimed at activating the dormant virus in p...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26292629

    MOTHER'S AGE, RACE, WEIGHT AFFECT HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS IN PREGNANCY, STUDY FINDS

    Feb 05, 2019

    Hormone concentrations during early fetal development that may affect the child's development and increase the mother's risk for breast and ovarian cancer years later are significantly affected by maternal age, body mass index and race rather than lifestyle, according to a Rutgers study. The...


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    WHAT DRIVES PATIENTS TO USE MEDICAL MARIJUANA: MOSTLY CHRONIC PAIN

    Feb 05, 2019

    Slowly but surely, the stigma surrounding marijuana use is losing its grip in the U.S. Since the 1990s, advocates have pushed for a re-evaluation of cannabis (the plant species name often used interchangeably with marijuana) as a viable treatment for a host of ailments. As of 2018, 33 states and the...


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    MODERNA’S NOT THE ONLY ONE: A LOOK AT THE MRNA MARKET

    Feb 04, 2019

    Although Moderna gets the lion’s share of attention in the mRNA market, it’s not the only company working to break away with this potentially disruptive technology. Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a family of RNA molecules that transport genetic information from DNA to the ribosome, where it spe...


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    THE WEB MEETS GENOMICS: A DNA SEARCH ENGINE FOR MICROBES

    Feb 04, 2019

    Researchers at EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) have combined their knowledge of bacterial genetics and web search algorithms to build a DNA search engine for microbial data. The search engine, described in a paper published in Nature Biotechnology, could enable researchers an...


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    MORE THAN 100 NEW GUT BACTERIA DISCOVERED IN HUMAN MICROBIOME

    Feb 04, 2019

    Scientists working on the gut microbiome have discovered and isolated more than 100 completely new species of bacteria from healthy people's intestines. The study from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hudson Institute of Medical Research, Australia, and EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26212621

    STRUCTURE OF VIRUS THAT INFECTS BACTERIA IN HOT SPRINGS IS REVEALED

    Feb 04, 2019

    Scientists have revealed the structure of a virus infecting bacteria that thrive in 160-degree hot springs in places like Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. The discovery could lead to better-targeted delivery of drugs into cells and new DNA sequencing technology, according to a study by Rutgers ...


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    MICROBES HITCHED TO INSECTS PROVIDE A RICH SOURCE OF NEW ANTIBIOTICS

    Feb 01, 2019

    Medicine was transformed in the 20th century by the discovery and development of antibiotics, the vast majority of which came from one source: soil bacteria. But we seem to have tapped out that supply. Resistance by disease-causing pathogens to existing antibiotics is increasing, endangering million...


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    STEM CELL GROWTH ACCELERATED BY TROPOELASTIN PROTEIN

    Feb 01, 2019

    Tropoelastin, the raw material used to create 'MeTro' elastic surgical glue developed with the University of Sydney, has been found to encourage stem cell growth—with the potential to ultimately help the body repair itself. Stem cells are vital for therapeutic treatments to repair and ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26112611

    BLOOD TEST FOR SPECIFIC METABOLITES COULD REVEAL BLOCKED ARTERIES

    Feb 01, 2019

    A Duke Health pilot project suggests that in the near future, a blood test could show whether arteries carrying blood to the heart are narrow or blocked, a risk factor for heart disease. According to the 40-person study published in the journal PLOS ONE, emergency patients who underwent a treadmill ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26122612

    ANTI-REJECTION DRUG RAPAMYCIN SHOWS PROMISE IN LIVER CANCER

    Feb 01, 2019

    Scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine were studying the cells that surround the liver’s central vein when they made a serendipitous discovery. Cells with a mutation in a gene called β-catenin also made high levels of the mTOR protein—a fault that they believe...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26132613

    JANSSEN AND MEIRAGTX SIGN $440 MILLION DEAL TO DEVELOP GENE THERAPIES FOR EYE DISEASES

    Jan 31, 2019

    Janssen Pharmaceutical, a Johnson & Johnson company, inked a worldwide collaboration and license deal with MeiraGTx to develop, manufacture and commercialize a portfolio of drugs for inherited retinal diseases. The portfolio includes product candidates for achromatopsia (ACHM) caused by mutation...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26012601

    A NEW APPROACH TO PERIPHERAL NERVE INJURY? NATURAL KILLER CELLS IN THE IMMUNE SYSTEM COULD PRESENT A TARGET

    Jan 31, 2019

    In animal models of a totally crushed peripheral nerve, the damaged axons are broken down, allowing healthy ones to regrow. But humans rarely suffer complete axonal damage. Instead, axons tend to be partially damaged, causing neuropathic pain—a difficult-to-treat, chronic pain associated with ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26022602

    ALEXION BAGS OPTION ON CAELUM TO BOOST HEMATOLOGY FRANCHISE

    Jan 31, 2019

    Alexion has gained an option to buy Caelum Biosciences for its light chain (AL) amyloidosis candidate. The deal sees Alexion take an equity stake in the Fortress Biotech subsidiary and commit to a package that could top $500 million. Caelum landed the deal on the strength of the potential of its lea...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26032603

    AN UNEXPECTED MODE OF ACTION FOR AN ANTIBODY

    Jan 31, 2019

    Studies of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from survivors of the coronavirus-induced severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle-East respiratory syndrome (MERS) are unveiling surprising immune defense tactics against fatal viruses. Atomic and molecular information about the workings of ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26042604

    CELLS THAT DESTROY THE INTESTINE

    Jan 30, 2019

    Patients affected by the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases Morbus Crohn and ulcerative colitis often suffer from flare-ups, which damage intestinal tissue. Despite advances in treating these diseases with medication, associated chronic inflammation cannot be kept sufficiently in check for a number...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25922592

    NEW ANTI-MALARIA DRUG FINDINGS REPORTED

    Jan 30, 2019

    Artemisinin is derived from the leaves and flowers of the annual mugwort (Artemisia annua) and has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. Chinese researcher Tu Youyou recently tested its effectiveness, winning the Nobel Prize in 2015. Artemisinin and its semi-synthetic derivatives&...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25932593

    NEW 3-D IMAGING TECHNIQUE REVEALS HOW PANCREATIC CANCERS START

    Jan 30, 2019

    A new technique to study tissue samples in 3-D has revealed that pancreatic cancers can start and grow in two distinct ways, solving a decades-old mystery of how tumors form. The new method could help researchers to get more information from tissue biopsies and may lead to improved treatments for pa...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25942594

    NOVEL AUTISM MOUSE MODEL BASED ON AN EPIGENETIC GENE DEVELOPED

    Jan 30, 2019

    The causes of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are diverse and to some extent, unknown. But without doubt, they are complex, layered and deeply nuanced. In a study published January 17, 2019, in Translational Psychiatry, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine describe how...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25952595

    SCIENTISTS GENERATE, TRACK DEVELOPMENT OF MYELIN-PRODUCING BRAIN CELLS

    Jan 29, 2019

    Studying human oligodendrocytes, which provide insulation for nerve cells, has been challenging. But a new way of generating stem-cell-derived, three-dimensional brain-cell cultures is paying off. For proper brain function, it's crucial that certain neurons be wrapped with myelin, a coating that...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25832583

    IN SIMPLE BACTERIA, SCIENTISTS FIND NEW EVIDENCE OF COMPLEX IMMUNITY

    Jan 29, 2019

    Bacteria have lots of enemies. Among them are rivaling bacteria, viruses, and even DNA namely, a special type of DNA called a plasmid, which can infect a microbe and hijack its inner resources to replicate. Luckily for them, bacteria have evolved remarkably flexible tactics for fighting off infectio...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25842584

    RESEARCH SHEDS LIGHT ON BODY CLOCK AND LINKS TO MENTAL HEALTH AND DISEASE

    Jan 29, 2019

    A large-scale genomic analysis has revealed some of the inner workings of the body clock, shedding new light on how it links to mental health and disease. The study, published in Nature Communications, suggests that being genetically programmed to rise early may lead to greater well-being and a lowe...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25852585

    SET OF GENES PREDICTS SEVERITY OF DENGUE, STUDY REPORTS

    Jan 29, 2019

    There's no such thing as a "good" case of dengue fever, but some are worse than others, and it's difficult to determine which patients will make a smooth recovery and which may find their condition life-threatening. Now, after scouring the gene expression of hundreds of patients in...


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    MEASURING FORCES OF LIVING CELLS AND MICROORGANISMS

    Jan 28, 2019

    Forces exerted by a living cell or a microorganism are tiny, often no larger than a few nanonewtons. For comparison, one nanonewton is the weight of one part in a billion of a typical chocolate bar. Yet, for biological cells and microbes, these forces are enough to allow cells to stick to a surface ...


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    RESEARCHERS DEVELOP URINE TEST FOR BLADDER CANCER

    Jan 28, 2019

    Researchers at the School of Medicine have developed a highly sensitive urine test for diagnosing and monitoring bladder cancer. The test involves looking for fragments of cancer DNA in urine samples. "This study describes a new diagnostic approach to bladder cancer focused on the analysis of u...


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    A SOLID SCAFFOLDING FOR CELLS

    Jan 28, 2019

    To perform the task for which they have been synthesized, proteins must first assemble to form effective cellular "machines." But how do they recognize their partners at the right time? Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) have deciphered the fundamental role of the Not1 protein...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25762576

    INJECTION OF OPIOIDS LINKED TO SIGNIFICANT INCREASE IN BACTERIAL HEART INFECTIONS

    Jan 28, 2019

    People who inject drugs are at high risk for a number of health issues. In a new study from ICES, Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University, researchers discovered a significant rise in the risk of infective endocarditis, a serious heart infection, among Ontarians who inject drugs. Whe...


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    PROTEIN PROMOTES SMALL ARTERY GROWTH TO DAMAGED HEART TISSUE IN MICE, STUDY FINDS

    Jan 24, 2019

    A collaboration between basic and clinical scientists at Stanford University has revealed a protein that promotes the growth of small arteries leading into oxygen-starved heart tissues in mice. Kristy Red-Horse, Ph.D., associate professor of biology, and Joseph Woo, MD, professor of cardiothoracic s...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25662566

    SLIM PEOPLE HAVE A GENETIC ADVANTAGE WHEN IT COMES TO MAINTAINING THEIR WEIGHT

    Jan 24, 2019

    In the largest study of its kind to date, Cambridge researchers have looked at why some people manage to stay thin while others gain weight easily. They have found that the genetic dice are loaded in favour of thin people and against those at the obese end of the spectrum. More than six in ten adult...


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    HBOT SHOWED IMPROVEMENT IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

    Jan 24, 2019

    Dr. Paul Harch, Clinical Professor and Director of Hyperbaric Medicine at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and Dr. Edward Fogarty, Chairman of Radiology at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine, report the first PET scan-documented case of improvement in brain metabolism in Alz...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25682568

    FROG EGGS HELP RESEARCHERS UNDERSTAND REPAIR OF DNA DAMAGES

    Jan 23, 2019

    The DNA replication process in which cells divide to create new cells also triggers the repair of DNA damage, researchers from the University of Copenhagen report in a new study. The researchers studied extracts from frog eggs, which have proteins very similar to those of human cells. The researcher...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25592559

    BREAKTHROUGH IN UNDERSTANDING MALE INFERTILITY

    Jan 23, 2019

    Hope has emerged for infertile men as scientists at Newcastle University have understood the importance of a gene in regulating the production of fully-functioning sperm. For the first time, experts have identified the role of the gene, RBMXL2, which is very similar to a possible infertility gene fo...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25602560

    NEW 3-D NANOPRINTING STRATEGY OPENS DOOR TO REVOLUTION IN MEDICINE, ROBOTICS

    Jan 23, 2019

    Engineers at the University of Maryland (UMD) have created the first 3-D-printed fluid circuit element so tiny that 10 could rest on the width of a human hair. The diode ensures fluids move in only a single direction—a critical feature for products like implantable devices that release therapi...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25612561

    RESEARCHERS FIRST TO USE CRISPR/CAS9 TO CONTROL GENETIC INHERITANCE IN MICE

    Jan 23, 2019

    Biologists at the University of California San Diego have developed the world's first CRISPR/Cas9-based approach to control genetic inheritance in a mammal. Scientists around the world have been using CRISPR/Cas9 in a variety of plant and animal species to edit genetic information. One approach ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25622562

    POSSIBLE LINK BETWEEN ROTAVIRUS VACCINE AND DECLINE IN TYPE 1 DIABETES

    Jan 22, 2019

    A drop in the number of young children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes could be associated with the introduction of routine rotavirus vaccination of Australian infants, according to a new study by Melbourne researchers. The researchers investigated the number of Australian children diagnosed with typ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25502550

    WREN RAISES £18M TO DRUG PROTEIN-MISFOLDING DISEASES

    Jan 22, 2019

    Wren Therapeutics has raised £18 million ($23 million). The British biotech will use the series A round to advance its research into drugs to treat protein-misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Researchers at the University of Cambridge and Lund University founded Wren in 2016 to adva...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25512551

    HUMAN RESPIRATORY VIRUSES CONTINUE TO SPREAD IN WILD CHIMPANZEES

    Jan 22, 2019

    Less than two years after the first report of wild chimpanzees in Uganda dying as a result of a human "common cold" virus, a new study has identified two other respiratory viruses of human origin in chimpanzee groups in the same forest. Writing this week (Jan. 21, 2019) in the journal Emer...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25522552

    SCIENTISTS EXAMINE HOW AN IMMUNE SYSTEM PROTEIN HELPS SUPPRESS HIV

    Jan 22, 2019

    Much of the research on HIV has focused on preventing infection but little is understood about how the body keeps the virus in check post-infection. A new study by Yale investigators reveals the role of a protein that serves to block HIV gene expression once it has entered human cells. The research ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25532553

    ROLE OF IRON IN INITIATING PROGRAMMED CELL DEATH

    Jan 21, 2019

    Health care professionals from I.M. Sechenov Moscow State Medical University published a review of scientific articles to illustrate how the atoms of iron initiate ferroptosis - programmed cell death. The article was published in the Free Radical Biology and Medicine journal. Iron is a part of many ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25412541

    GENE THERAPY PROMOTES NERVE REGENERATION

    Jan 21, 2019

    Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) and the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) have shown that treatment using gene therapy leads to faster recovery after nerve damage. By combining a surgical repair procedure with gene therapy, the survival of nerve cells and the ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25422542

    IT'S A KNOCKOUT: MOUSE MIRNA PAIR PROVIDES CANCER INSIGHT

    Jan 21, 2019

    A team at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) has revealed the molecule to cancer development, showing that its absence leads to dysregulation of the cell cycle, albeit with differing cancer-related outcomes. Tokyo, Japan - The abnormal expression of different classes of molecules are known t...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25432543

    CELGENE SIGNS BRACE OF IMMUNO-ONCOLOGY DEALS WITH US BIOTECHS

    Jan 21, 2019

    Despite a looming takeover by Bristol-Myers Squibb, Celgene hasn’t stopped making pipeline-boosting deals. It’s just added two more partnerships for new drug and cell-based cancer immunotherapies. First up is a licensing deal with Kyn Therapeutics, in which Celgene is paying $80 million ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25442544

    NANOPARTICLE BREAKTHROUGH IN THE FIGHT AGAINST CANCER

    Jan 18, 2019

    A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer. A team of researchers, affiliated with UNIST has recently introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system th...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25312531

    SCIENTISTS CREATE A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF CANCER-FIGHTING T CELLS

    Jan 18, 2019

    A study by UCLA researchers is the first to demonstrate a technique for coaxing pluripotent stem cells—which can give rise to every cell type in the body and which can be grown indefinitely in the lab—into becoming mature T cells capable of killing tumor cells. The technique uses structu...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25322532

    DISCOVERY OF ENHANCED BONE GROWTH COULD LEAD TO NEW TREATMENTS FOR OSTEOPOROSIS

    Jan 18, 2019

    UCLA and UC San Francisco life scientists have discovered a dramatic pattern of bone growth in female mice—research that could potentially lead to stronger bone density in women and new treatments for osteoporosis in older women. The researchers found that blocking a particular set of signals ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25332533

    NEW STUDY SHOWS PHYSICIAN-TARGETED MARKETING IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASE IN OPIOID OVERDOSE DEATHS

    Jan 18, 2019

    Many individuals cite prescription opioids as their gateway to illicit opioid use. However, while prescription opioids are involved in more than one-third of all opioid overdose deaths in the U.S., examining any correlation between prescription opioid overdose deaths and pharmaceutical industry mark...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25342534

    KILLING TUMOURS BY TARGETING THEIR VIRAL DNA

    Jan 18, 2019

    The Epstein-Barr virus infects more than 95 percent of people, usually without symptoms. But sometimes its persistence in cells can lead to tumour formation. Now, researchers from Hong Kong and the UK have developed a fluorescing, molecular-sized probe, called L2P4, which can inhibit Epstein-Barr-re...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25352535

    EXTRACTING FUNCTIONAL MITOCHONDRIA USING MICROFLUIDICS DEVICES

    Jan 16, 2019

    Mitochondria are dynamic, bioenergetic intracellular organelles, responsible for energy production via ATP production during respiration. They are involved in key cellular metabolic tasks that regulate vital physiological responses of cells, including cell signaling, cell differentiation, and cell d...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25232523

    STUDY DEFINES DIFFERENCES AMONG BRAIN NEURONS THAT COINCIDE WITH PSYCHIATRIC CONDITIONS

    Jan 16, 2019

    It's no surprise to scientists that variety is the very essence of biology, not just the seasoning, but most previous studies of key brain cells have found little variability in a common cell process that involves how genetic information is read and acted on. The process, called epigenetics, inv...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25242524

    A COMPREHENSIVE METABOLIC MAP FOR PRODUCTION OF BIO-BASED CHEMICALS

    Jan 16, 2019

    A KAIST research team completed a metabolic map that charts all available strategies and pathways of chemical reactions that lead to the production of various industrial bio-based chemicals. The team was led by Distinguished Professor Sang Yup Lee, who has produced high-quality metabolic engineering...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25252525

    GUT BACTERIA MAKE KEY AMINO ACIDS DISPENSABLE, EXPANDING FOOD OPTIONS FOR INVASIVE FLIES

    Jan 16, 2019

    Fruit flies fed antibiotics to suppress their gut microbiome are forced to avoid the best food patches if they lack vital amino acids, according to a study by Boaz Yuval from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel and Chang-Ying Nui from Huazhong Agricultural University in China, publishing Ja...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25262526

    EPIGENETIC CHANGE AND HIGH-FAT DIET LEAD TO INHERITED HEART DISEASE

    Jan 15, 2019

    Researchers from the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have identified an epigenetic marker and two genes that caused heart failure in the children and grandchildren of fruit flies with high-fat-diet-induced heart dysfunction. Reversing the epigenetic modification or over-expr...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25132513

    STUDY REVEALS HOW FASTING CAN IMPROVE OVERALL HEALTH AND PROTECT AGAINST AGING-ASSOCIATED DISEASES

    Jan 15, 2019

    In a University of California, Irvine-led study, researchers found evidence that fasting affects circadian clocks in the liver and skeletal muscle, causing them to rewire their metabolism, which can ultimately lead to improved health and protection against aging-associated diseases. The study was pu...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25142514

    HINDERING MELANOMA METASTASIS WITH AN FDA-APPROVED DRUG

    Jan 15, 2019

    For cancer to spread, it needs a hospitable environment in distant organs. This fertile "soil" can provide a home to circulating malignant cells. Recent research has shown that cancer cells from the primary tumor can help ready this soil by sending out small vesicles. These vesicles contai...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25152515

    DNA ORIGAMI USED TO MEASURE TOP EFFECTIVENESS OF ANTIBODIES

    Jan 15, 2019

    Researchers at the Karolinska Institutet and the University of Oslo in Norway used DNA origami to demonstrate the most accurate distance between densely packed antigens in order to get the strongest bond to antibodies in the immune system. The study (“Binding to nanopatterned antigens is domin...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25162516

    RESEARCH CONFIRMS NERVE CELLS MADE FROM SKIN CELLS ARE A VALID LAB MODEL FOR STUDYING DISEASE

    Jan 15, 2019

    The incidence of some neurological diseases—especially those related to aging, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases—is increasing. To better understand these conditions and evaluate potential new treatments, researchers need accurate models that they can study in the lab....


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25172517

    LIFE-THREATENING LUNG DISEASE AVERTED IN EXPERIMENTAL MODELS

    Jan 14, 2019

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal condition that leaves lung tissue permanently scarred and leads to the decline and eventual failure of the respiratory system. For those diagnosed with the disease, treatment options are limited and the prognosis is poor. But a new study published Janua...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25032503

    BREAST CANCER CELLS IN MICE TRICKED INTO TURNING INTO FAT CELLS

    Jan 14, 2019

    As cancer cells respond to cues in their microenvironment, they can enter a highly plastic state in which they are susceptible to transdifferentiation into a different type of cell. Researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland exploited this critical phase, known as an epithelial-mesenchyma...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25042504

    BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER BREAKDOWN AN EARLY DRIVER OF DEMENTIA, STUDY SAYS

    Jan 14, 2019

    Leaky capillaries in the brain portend early onset of Alzheimer's disease as they signal cognitive impairment before hallmark toxic proteins amyloid and tau appear, new USC research shows. The findings, which appear in the Jan. 14 issue of Nature Medicine, could help with earlier diagnosis and s...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25052505

    DRUG HOBBLES DEADLY LIVER CANCER BY STIFLING PROTEIN PRODUCTION

    Jan 14, 2019

    In laboratory experiments, UC San Francisco researchers successfully beat back the growth of aggressive liver cancers using a surprising new approach. Traditionally, targeted cancer therapies aim to disable proteins borne of cancer-driving genes. Instead, the UCSF scientists prevented these proteins...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25062506

    SCIENTISTS COAX PROTEINS TO FORM SYNTHETIC STRUCTURES WITH METHOD THAT MIMICS NATURE

    Jan 14, 2019

    Scientists have long dreamed of creating synthetic structures out of the same raw material that nature uses in living systems proteins believing such an advance would allow for the development of transformative nanomachines, for example, molecular cages that precisely deliver chemotherapy drugs to t...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=25072507

    RESEARCHERS MAP PREVIOUSLY UNKNOWN DISEASE IN CHILDREN

    Jan 11, 2019

    Two children from Europe and one from Canada, aged four, six and 10, suffer from a previously unknown disease that causes epileptic seizures, loss of magnesium and reduced intelligence. There is currently no way to treat or alleviate their symptoms.
    But researchers in an international consort...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24932493

    NEW LEUKEMIA DRUG IS MORE EFFECTIVE AND EASIER TO USE

    Jan 11, 2019

    A landmark study co-authored by a Loyola Medicine oncologist has found that a newer targeted drug is significantly more effective than standard therapy for treating elderly patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The drug, ibrutinib, attacks cancer cells without damaging normal cells, thus...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24942494

    ORCHARD THERAPEUTICS' 2019: PIPELINE PROGRESS, BREAKING GROUND ON ITS $90M MANUFACTURING SITE

    Jan 11, 2019

    Orchard Therapeutics started 2018 with two clinical-stage assets and a preclinical pipeline that was, in CEO Mark Rothera’s words, “not that large.” Now, after picking up GlaxoSmithKline’s rare disease gene therapy unit and becoming a commercial-stage company, Orchard is look...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24952495

    HOW MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES THRIVE IN HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED SHALE WELLS

    Jan 11, 2019

    In survival game shows, contestants have whisked away to a foreign location, where they face unfamiliar stresses. To stay in the game, they must adapt to the surroundings and often need to work together with fellow competitors. As it turns out, the same is true on the microscopic level for microbes,...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24962496

    VAT FAT MAY CAUSE PATHOGENIC OBESITY

    Jan 11, 2019

    Type-2 (adult-onset) diabetes and other diseases related to the obesity epidemic depend on how the body stores excess energy, according to evolutionary biologist Mary Jane West-Eberhard, emeritus scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. In the Proceedings of the National Academy of ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24972497

    ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE IN THE ENVIRONMENT LINKED TO FECAL POLLUTION

    Jan 10, 2019

    A new study indicates that fecal pollution can largely explain the increase in resistant bacteria often found in human-impacted environments. Increased levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the environment may have different causes. It could be a consequence of on-site selection from antibiotic...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24832483

    PROTEIN PRODS CANCER-FIGHTING T CELLS

    Jan 10, 2019

    Scientists at UW Medicine's Institute for Protein Design (IPD) in Seattle have created a new protein that mimics the action of a key immune regulatory protein, interleukin 2 (IL-2).  IL-2 is a potent anticancer drug and an effective treatment for autoimmune disease, but its toxic side effec...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24842484

    BACTERIA HELP DISCOVER HUMAN CANCER-CAUSING PROTEINS

    Jan 10, 2019

    A team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Texas at Austin has applied an unconventional approach that used bacteria to discover human proteins that can lead to DNA damage and promote cancer. Reported in the journal Cell, the study also proposes biological mechanis...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24852485

    TARGETING AN RNA-BINDING PROTEIN TO FIGHT AGING

    Jan 10, 2019

    Aging bodies undergo biological changes that cause a decline in the function of cells and tissues. However, most studies attempting to identify molecules involved in age-related dysfunctions have focused only on mechanisms based on mRNA transcription, a very important step in gene expression, but no...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24862486

    RESEARCHERS IDENTIFY DRUG AGAINST THE FORMATION OF METASTASIS

    Jan 10, 2019

    The most deadly aspect of breast cancer is metastasis, cancer cells spreading throughout the body. Researchers at the University and the University Hospital of Basel have now discovered a substance that suppresses the formation of metastases. In the journal Cell, the team of molecular biologists, co...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24872487

    CRISPR METHOD SUPRESSES FERTILITY IN AGRICULTURAL PESTS

    Jan 09, 2019

    Combining historical lessons with modern genetic technologies, scientists at the University of California San Diego have developed a new way to control and suppress populations of insects, potentially including those that ravage agricultural crops and transmit deadly diseases. Using the CRISPR gene ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24732473

    TWO-THIRDS OF STROKE SURVIVORS ARE IN EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD MENTAL HEALTH

    Jan 09, 2019

    Two-thirds of stroke survivors are in complete mental health despite the impact of their stroke, according to a large, nationally representative Canadian study conducted by researchers at the University of Toronto's Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. "It is so heartening to learn that...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24742474

    FIGHTING ANOTHER VIRUS? BLAME YOUR PARENTS

    Jan 09, 2019

    Genetics may play a bigger role in the body's disease-fighting ability than scientists previously thought, according to the results from a new study of twins in Queensland, Australia. Scientists have long known that people build their own immune defense networks using antibodies—which are ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24752475

    STEM CELL STUDY OFFERS CLUES FOR OPTIMIZING BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTS AND MORE

    Jan 09, 2019

    Bone marrow transplants, which involve transplanting healthy blood stem cells, offer the best treatment for many types of cancers, blood disorders, and immune diseases. Even though 22,000 of these procedures are performed each year in the US, much remains to be understood about how they work. A new ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24762476

    SCHIZOPHRENIA LINKED WITH ABNORMAL IMMUNE RESPONSE TO EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS

    Jan 09, 2019

    New research from Johns Hopkins Medicine and Sheppard Pratt Health System shows that people in the study with schizophrenia also have higher levels of antibodies against the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpes virus that causes infectious mononucleosis, so-called mono. Researchers proposed two explan...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24772477

    BIOENGINEERS LOOK DEEPER INTO HOW ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ACTIVATES NEURONS

    Jan 08, 2019

    Electrical stimulation of the brain is common practice in neuroscience research and is an increasingly common and effective clinical therapy for a variety of neurological disorders. However, there is limited understanding of why this treatment works at the neural level. A paper published by Takashi ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24632463

    NEW ANTIBIOTIC PROVES TO BE EFFECTIVE AGAINST RIVER BLINDNESS IN MICE

    Jan 08, 2019

    A team of researchers from the U.K., the U.S., Japan, and Germany has developed an antibiotic that kills a type of bacteria necessary for larval growth in the parasitic worm that causes river blindness. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24642464

    FLU VACCINE SUPPLY GAPS CAN INTENSIFY FLU SEASONS, MAKE PANDEMICS DEADLIER

    Jan 08, 2019

    More than 50 million people died in the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918-1919. Its 100th anniversary this flu season serves as a reminder to close flu vaccine supply gaps that may be costing lives now and could cost many more when the next "big one" strikes, researchers say. U.S. flu vaccine d...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24652465

    MEDICAL SCANNER HELPS TO UNLOCK THE MYSTERIES OF A GIANT PREHISTORIC MARINE REPTILE

    Jan 08, 2019

    A nearly meter-long skull of a giant fossil marine ichthyosaur found in a farmer's field more than 60 years ago has been studied for the first time. Using cutting-edge computerized tomography (CT) scanning technology, the research reveals new information including details of the rarely preserved...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24662466

    NEW CRISPR-BASED TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPED TO CONTROL PESTS WITH PRECISION-GUIDED GENETICS

    Jan 08, 2019

    Using the CRISPR gene editing tool, Nikolay Kandul, Omar Akbari and their colleagues at UC San Diego and UC Berkeley devised a method of altering key genes that control insect sex determination and fertility. A description of the new "precision-guided sterile insect technique," or pgSIT, i...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24672467

    GENETIC TESTING NOT CAUSING UNDUE WORRY ABOUT CANCER RISK

    Jan 07, 2019

    As genetic testing for breast cancer has become more complex, evaluating a panel of multiple genes, it introduces more uncertainty about the results. But a new study finds that newer, more extensive tests are not causing patients to worry more about their cancer risk. "Genetic testing is becomi...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24532453

    ADAPTIVE BIOTECHNOLOGIES AND GENENTECH LAUNCH PERSONALIZED CANCER-CARE PROGRAM WORTH $2 BILLION+

    Jan 07, 2019

    Seattle-based Adaptive Biotechnologies forged a collaboration with Genentech that could be worth up to $2 billion to develop and commercialize novel neoantigen directed T-cell therapies for the individualized treatment of a broad range of cancers. The companies will combine Genentech’s noted i...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24542454

    STEM CELL SIGNAL DRIVES NEW BONE BUILDING

    Jan 07, 2019

    In experiments in rats and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that a cellular protein signal that drives both bone and fat formation in selected stem cells can be manipulated to favor bone building. If harnessed in humans, they say, the protein—know...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24552455

    POWERFUL X-RAY BEAMS UNLOCK SECRETS OF NANOSCALE CRYSTAL FORMATION

    Jan 07, 2019

    High-energy X-ray beams and a clever experimental setup allowed researchers to watch a high-pressure, high-temperature chemical reaction to determine for the first time what controls the formation of two different nanoscale crystalline structures in the metal cobalt. The technique allowed the contin...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24562456

    SCIENCE RACES AGAINST TICK-BORNE VIRUS

    Jan 07, 2019

    Two groundbreaking discoveries by USC researchers could lead to medications and a vaccine to treat or prevent a hemorrhagic fever transmitted by a new tick species before it spreads across the United States. In the Jan. 7 Nature Microbiology, researchers describe the molecular mechanisms used by the...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24572457

    CANCER CELLS STEER A JAGGED PATH

    Jan 04, 2019

    A jagged little protein appears to be key to how cancer stem cells differentiate and enable metastasis, according to researchers at Rice University and the Duke University School of Medicine. Rice scientists who have formed several theories on how cancer grows and spreads connected the dots for a mo...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24432443

    IMPROVED TREATMENT FOR ALCOHOL USE DISORDERS

    Jan 04, 2019

    Helping people with addictions have become a research passion for Purdue University's Richard van Rijn, who is leading a team to make drug discoveries to support millions around the world dealing with alcohol use disorders, chronic pain, and mood disorders. "These disorders are currently no...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24442444

    RESEARCH SHOWS GUT MICROBIOME PROTECTS AGAINST ACUTE ARSENIC TOXICITY

    Jan 04, 2019

    Research conducted at Montana State University shows that microbes in the human gut play an important role in protecting against arsenic toxicity, a problem that affects an estimated 200 million people who are exposed to arsenic through contaminated drinking water. For the past five years, MSU docto...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24452445

    FUNGI CAUSE BRAIN INFECTION AND IMPAIR MEMORY IN MICE

    Jan 04, 2019

    Fungal infections are emerging as a major medical challenge, and a team led by researchers at the Baylor College of Medicine has developed a mouse model to study the short-term consequences of fungal infection in the brain. The researchers report in the journal Nature Communications the unexpected f...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24462446

    THE PRICKLE1 GENE REGULATES THE DIFFERENTIATION OF FRONTAL BONE OSTEOBLASTS IN A NEW ANIMAL MODEL

    Jan 04, 2019

    A mechanically compromised skull can result from enlarged fontanelles and smaller frontal bones due to defective migration and differentiation of osteoblasts in the skull primordia (developing skull). The Wnt/Planar cell polarity signaling pathway (Wnt/PCP), usually regulates cell migration and move...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24472447

    NOVARTIS PROVIDES DATA TO SPARK, PEW'S PLATFORM FOR ANTIBIOTIC DISCOVERY RESEARCH

    Jan 03, 2019

    The Pew Charitable Trusts announced today that Novartis has shared data from its antibiotic research programs on Pew's open-access Shared Platform for Antibiotic Research and Knowledge (SPARK). The move follows Achaogen's commitment in October to provide SPARK with data from its own disconti...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24332433

    EX-NOVARTIS ONCOLOGY CEO LIZ BARRETT JOINS UROGEN

    Jan 03, 2019

    Ex-Novartis Oncology CEO Liz Barrett has joined UroGen Pharma. Barrett is taking over as CEO of the uro-oncology specialist at a time when it is working on a rolling NDA that could lead to its first drug approval. Barrett ended a 10-month stint as CEO of Novartis Oncology shortly before Christmas af...


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    DISCOVERY IN CELL DEVELOPMENT CHANGES UNDERSTANDING OF HOW GENES SHAPE EARLY EMBRYOS

    Jan 03, 2019

    Our bodies hold roughly 14 trillion cells, each containing a nucleus with DNA measuring two meters long by 20 atoms wide. To fit inside each nucleus, DNA coils around specialized proteins. These spools of wrapped DNA inhibit gene regulatory proteins from binding to protein-coding stretches along the...


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    OBESE MICE LOSE ANXIETY WHEN 'ZOMBIE CELLS' EXIT THEIR BRAIN

    Jan 03, 2019

    Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators have shown in mice that obesity increases the level of "zombie" or senescent cells in the brain, and that those cells, in turn, are linked to anxiety. When senolytic drugs are used to clear those cells, the anxious behaviors in the mice dissipate. ...


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    NEWBORN GENOMIC SEQUENCING DETECTS UNANTICIPATED DISEASE RISK FACTORS

    Jan 03, 2019

    As genomic sequencing becomes increasingly commonplace in the clinic, questions remain about its use and role among newborns. Can sequencing provide actionable insights? How common is it to find something important to a child's future health? What benefits or consequences will sequencing have fo...


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    SCIENTISTS PRODUCE 'DESIGNER TRIACYLGLYCEROLS' IN INDUSTRIAL MICROALGAE

    Jan 02, 2019

    Molecules of triacylglycerol (TAG), formed by attaching three molecules of fatty acid (FA) to a glycerol backbone, are the main constituents of vegetable oil in plants and fats in animals and humans. TAG plays an important role in cellular metabolism as a universal storage form and currency of energ...


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    THE IMMUNE SYSTEM'S FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH

    Jan 02, 2019

    If only we could keep our bodies young, healthy and energetic, even as we attain the wisdom of our years. New research at the Weizmann Institute of Science suggests this dream could be at least partly obtainable in the future. The results of this research, led by Prof. Valery Krizhanovsky and Dr. Yo...


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    IS HABITAT RESTORATION ACTUALLY KILLING PLANTS IN THE CALIFORNIA WILDLANDS?

    Jan 02, 2019

    In 2014, plant biologists with the California Department of Agriculture reported an alarming discovery: native wildflowers and herbs, grown in nurseries and then planted in ecological restoration sites around California, were infected with Phytophthora tentaculata, a deadly exotic plant pathogen tha...


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    TUMORS BACKFIRE ON CHEMOTHERAPY

    Jan 02, 2019

    Some patients with breast cancer receive chemotherapy before the tumor is removed with surgery. This approach, called neoadjuvant therapy, helps to reduce the size of the tumor to facilitate breast-conserving surgery, and can even eradicate the tumor, leaving few or no cancerous cells for the surgeo...


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    MYSTERY OF YEMEN CHOLERA EPIDEMIC SOLVED

    Jan 02, 2019

    The most likely source of the cholera epidemic in Yemen has been discovered by scientists. Through the use of genomic sequencing, scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and Institut Pasteur estimate the strain of cholera-causing the current outbreak in Yemen the worst cholera outbreak in record...


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    PINE NEEDLES FROM OLD CHRISTMAS TREES COULD BE TURNED INTO PAINT AND FOOD SWEETENERS IN THE FUTURE

    Dec 27, 2018

    Abandoned Christmas trees could be saved from the landfill and turned into paint and food sweeteners according to new research by the University of Sheffield. Christmas trees have hundreds of thousands of pine needles which take a long time to decompose compared to other tree leaves. When they rot, ...


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    RESEARCHERS UNRAVEL MYSTERY OF HOW, WHEN DNA REPLICATES

    Dec 27, 2018

    A team of Florida State University researchers has unlocked a decades-old mystery about how a critical cellular process is regulated and what that could mean for the future study of genetics. In cells, DNA and its associated material replicate at regular intervals, a process essential to all living ...


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    RESEARCHERS MONITOR ELECTRON BEHAVIOR DURING CHEMICAL REACTIONS FOR THE FIRST TIME

    Dec 27, 2018

    In a recent publication in Science, researchers at the University of Paderborn and the Fritz Haber Institute Berlin demonstrated their ability to observe electrons' movements during a chemical reaction. Researchers have long studied the atomic-scale processes that govern chemical reactions but w...

    GAUSS CENTRE FOR SUPERCOMPUTING
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    EUROPEAN WHEAT LACKS CLIMATE RESILIENCE

    Dec 27, 2018

    The climate is not only warming, but it is also becoming more variable and extreme. Such unpredictable weather can weaken global food security if major crops such as wheat are not sufficiently resilient—and if we are not properly prepared. A group of European researchers, including Professor J...

    AARHUS UNIVERSITY
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    LOSING NEURONS IS SOMETIMES NOT ALL BAD

    Dec 27, 2018

    Current thinking about Alzheimer's disease is that neuronal cell death in the brain is to blame for the cognitive havoc caused by the disease. But a new study suggests that neuronal death may actually be a protective reaction against the disease. This could lead to a complete rethinking of thera...


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    HEART ATTACK, STROKE MAY BE AN EARLY SIGN OF CANCERS: RESEARCHERS

    Dec 26, 2018

    New York: Heart attack or stroke may be an early sign of cancers, especially in older adults, say researchers. The findings showed that the risk of having a heart attack and stroke jumped by 70 percent in the year before cancer diagnosis. The risk was most acute in the month immediately before the c...


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    FISH SKIN CHEAPER, LESS PAINFUL IN TREATING BURNS THAN BANDAGES: SCIENTIST

    Dec 26, 2018

    London: Using fish skin to heal burns can be cheaper and less painful than bandages, says a scientist. Using the skin of Tilapia -- a freshwater fish -- on burns could be effective since it is rich in moisture and collagen proteins, the Daily Mail quoted Felipe Rocha, a neurologist at the Federal Un...


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    NEURITOSIS STUDY OPENS DOOR FOR POTENTIAL NEW THERAPIES FOR NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES

    Dec 26, 2018

    Scientists from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, using animal models and nerve cells were grown in the lab, have described a new mechanism dubbed “neuritosis” that might explain neurons shrinking in Huntington’s and other neurodegenerative diseases, opening new targ...


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    NEW AND IMPROVED SINGLE-CELL RNA SEQUENCING METHOD

    Dec 26, 2018

    The single-cell analysis allows researchers to tease apart single cells from a population, going beyond the analysis afforded by traditional bulk profiling methods. Single-cell RNA sequencing can uncover rare cell populations, regulatory relationships between genes, and determine cell lineages durin...


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    MEDICATION FOR SEVERE ACNE ALTERS SKIN MICROBIOME: STUDY

    Dec 24, 2018

    New York: Researchers have found that a common acne medication has the potential to alter the microbiome of the skin, raising the possibility of developing microbiome-based acne treatments. Isotretinoin, a form of vitamin A, has been prescribed to treat acne for decades. It reduces oil production in...


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    CHROMATOGRAPHY IN PHARMACEUTICALS AND BIOTECHNOLOGY: SURGE IN THE DEMAND FOR REAGENTS & CHROMATOGRAPHY INSTRUMENTS TO DRIVE DEMAND

    Dec 24, 2018

    Technological advances have ameliorated chromatography methods which have paved way for improved security, higher resolutions, and rapid speed of analysis and peak separation. Moreover, swelling demand for automation and data integrity has led to the integration of contemporary chromatography system...


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    CHOLESTEROL-LOWERING DRUGS INHIBIT BROWN FAT ACTIVITY

    Dec 24, 2018

    The fat that we accumulate when we put on weight comprises a type of fat tissue known as white adipose tissue (WAT), but another, beneficial type of fat, known as brown adipose tissue (BAT), acts to generate heat and so burn off energy. Although adults tend to have very little BAT, those who do are ...


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    IT ERROR WRONGLY ATTRIBUTED TO BREAST SCREENING INCIDENT IN ENGLAND, REVIEW FINDS

    Dec 24, 2018

    Thousands of women in England were “warned unnecessarily” that they did not receive an invitation to a final routine breast screening in an incident believed to have been caused by an IT error, according to an independent review released this month. Back in May, then Secretary of State f...


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    HOWLER MONKEY STUDY EXAMINES MECHANISMS OF NEW SPECIES FORMATION

    Dec 22, 2018

    A new University of Michigan study of interbreeding between two species of howler monkeys in Mexico is yielding insights into the forces that drive the evolution of new species. How do new species emerge in nature? One common but overly simplified version of the story goes like this: A population of...


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    STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS PROTEIN EXPLAINED IN DETAIL

    Dec 21, 2018

    An international team of researchers has solved the structure and elucidated the function of photosynthetic complex I. This membrane protein complex plays a major role in dynamically rewiring photosynthesis. The team from the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry, Osaka University, and Ruhr-Universi...


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    EXPERIMENTAL ALZHEIMER'S DRUG IMPROVES MEMORY IN MICE

    Dec 21, 2018

    An experimental drug known as A03, which was previously developed to treat depression, increases the levels of the enzyme Sirtuin1, or SirT1, and improves memory in mice. The mice were genetically modified to have a protein called ApoE4, the most common genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's diseas...

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES
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    ENZYME'S UNFROZEN ADVENTURE: IN CRYSTALLO PROTEIN THERMODYNAMICS

    Dec 21, 2018

    Enzymes—biocatalysts made of proteins—are hugely important molecules that catalyze the reactions and processes in living organisms. Ongoing work to understand their structures and reaction mechanisms is therefore vital to broaden our knowledge and contribute to scientific and medical adv...


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    NEGATIVE MOOD SIGNALS BODY'S IMMUNE RESPONSE

    Dec 21, 2018

    Negative mood such as sadness and anger is associated with higher levels of inflammation and may be a signal of poor health, according to researchers at Penn State. The investigators found that negative mood measured multiple times a day over time is associated with higher levels of inflammatory bio...


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    POLLUTANTS FROM WILDFIRES AFFECT CROP AND VEGETATION GROWTH HUNDREDS OF KILOMETERS FROM IMPACT ZONE

    Dec 21, 2018

    Pollutants from wildfires affect crop and vegetation growth hundreds of kilometers from the impact zone, research shows The startling extent to which violent wildfires, similar to those that ravaged large swathes of California recently, affect forests and crops way beyond the boundaries of the blaze...


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    NEW OPTICAL MEMORY CELL ACHIEVES RECORD DATA-STORAGE DENSITY

    Dec 20, 2018

    Researchers have demonstrated a new technique that can store more optical data in a smaller space than was previously possible on-chip. This technique improves upon the phase-change optical memory cell, which uses light to write and read data, and could offer a faster, more power-efficient form of m...


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    STEM CELL-DERIVED NEURONS STOP SEIZURES AND IMPROVE COGNITIVE FUNCTION

    Dec 20, 2018

    About 3.4 million Americans, or 1.2 percent of the population, have active epilepsy. Although the majority respond to medication, between 20 and 40 percent of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures even after trying multiple anti-seizure drugs. Even when the drugs do work, people may devel...

    TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
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    AMOEBA FINDS APPROXIMATE SOLUTIONS TO NP-HARD PROBLEM IN LINEAR TIME

    Dec 20, 2018

    Researchers have demonstrated that an amoeba a single-celled organism consisting mostly of gelatinous protoplasm has unique computing abilities that may one day offer a competitive alternative to the methods used by conventional computers. The researchers, led by Masashi Aono at Keio University, ass...


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    SELFISH GENES CAN ACT AS BOTH MAKERS, BREAKERS OF SPECIES

    Dec 20, 2018

    A selfish streak in genes known to drive species apart might occasionally bring them closer together, says a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Rochester. Though the vast majority of genes are essential to organisms' survival and reproduction, some selfishly turn...


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    RESEARCHERS USE DNA NANOMACHINES TO DISCOVER SUBGROUPS OF LYSOSOMES

    Dec 20, 2018

    The story of the lysosome is a classic smear campaign. Once dismissed as the garbage disposal of the cell it does break down unneeded cell debris it is now valued by scientists who realized all that dirty work also controls survival, metabolism, longevity and even neurodegenerative diseases. An inno...


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    GENEVA HEALTH PARTNERS WITH OCHSNER IN REMOTE CARDIAC MONITORING

    Dec 19, 2018

    Ochsner Health System has tapped Geneva Health Solutions to manage data collection and remote monitoring of its patients with implanted cardiac devices across the southern U.S. Geneva will gather data from implanted pacemakers, defibrillators, loop recorders, and other devices and integrate them int...


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    MICROBIOMES OF MICE AND MEN

    Dec 19, 2018

    Scientists have long known that bacteria in the intestines, also known as the microbiome, perform a variety of useful functions for their hosts, such as breaking down dietary fiber in the digestive process and making vitamins K and B7. Yet a new study unveils another useful role the microbiome plays...


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    GIANT FUNGUS COVERING MANY ACRES FOUND TO HAVE STABLE MUTATION RATE

    Dec 19, 2018

    A team of researchers from Canada and the U.S. has found that a giant fungus covering many acres has a stable mutation rate. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the extremely old fungus and what they found. Back in 1983, Johann Bruhn of ...


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    SCIENTISTS PROGRAM PROTEINS TO PAIR EXACTLY

    Dec 19, 2018

    Proteins have now been designed in the lab to zip together in much the same way that DNA molecules zip up to form a double helix. The technique, whose development was led by University of Washington School of Medicine scientists, could enable the design of protein nanomachines that can potentially h...


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    SOCIAL ANIMALS HAVE MORE PARASITE INFECTIONS BUT LOWER INFECTION-RELATED COSTS

    Dec 19, 2018

    Animals living in large groups tend to have more parasites than less social animals do, but according to a new study in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, they may also be better protected from the negative effects of those parasites. Ecologists at the University of Georgia found that Grant's g...


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    SCIENTISTS CREATE BEE VACCINE TO FIGHT OFF 'INSECT APOCALYPSE'

    Dec 14, 2018

    Scientists in Finland have developed what they believe is the world's first vaccine to protect bees against disease, raising hopes for tackling the drastic decline in insect numbers which could cause a global food crisis. Bees are vital for growing the world's food as they help fertilize thr...


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    STUDY PEELS BACK DETAILS ON MAMMALIAN KERATIN GENES AND ADAPTATION TO LIVING ON LAND OR SEA

    Dec 14, 2018

    Whether by land or by sea, mammals live in a diverse variety of protective skins adapted against the elements, from swimming in the deepest azure oceans to climbing precipitous mountain peaks. Now, Medical University of Vienna professor Leopold Eckhart and colleagues have performed one of the larges...


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    COLLAGEN NANOFIBRILS IN MAMMALIAN TISSUES GET STRONGER WITH EXERCISE

    Dec 14, 2018

    Collagen is the fundamental building block of muscles, tissues, tendons, and ligaments in mammals. It is also widely used in reconstructive and cosmetic surgery. Although scientists have a good understanding of how it behaves at the tissue-level, some key mechanical properties of collagen at the nan...


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    RNA PROCESSING AND ANTIVIRAL IMMUNITY

    Dec 14, 2018

    The RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) are intracellular enzyme sentries that detect viral infection and initiate the first line of antiviral defense. The cellular molecules that activate RLRs in vivo are not clear. John Karijolich, Ph.D., and colleagues have made the surprising discovery that host-derived...


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    A PAINLESS ADHESIVE: ADHESIVES FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS CAN BE DETACHED WITH LIGHT

    Dec 14, 2018

    Pulling off a Band-Aid may soon get a lot less painful. Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and Xi'an Jiaotong University in China have developed a new type of adhesive that can strongly adhere wet materials such as hydrogel and living t...

    SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCES
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    NEUROSCIENTISTS UNCOVER SENSORY SWITCHES CONTROLLING INFANTICIDE AND PARENTAL BEHAVIOR

    Dec 13, 2018

    Many species of mammals have evolved what appear to be paradoxical behaviours towards their young. Like humans, most exhibit nurturing, protective behaviours, and in some circumstances even act as surrogate parents. However, virgin males often engage in infanticide as a strategy to propagate their o...


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    ORCHARD EXPECTS TO HIRE 100, EXPANDS GENE THERAPY MANUFACTURING IN BAY AREA

    Dec 13, 2018

    Orchard Therapeutics is expanding its physical footprint in California. The U.K.-based company signed a long-term lease to build out a gene therapy manufacturing facility in Fremont, Calif. The 150,000-square-foot facility will add to the company’s presence in the Bay Area. In its announcement...


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    THE 'GREYING' OF T CELLS: SCIENTISTS PINPOINT METABOLIC PATHWAY BEHIND AGE-RELATED IMMUNITY LOSS

    Dec 13, 2018

    The elderly suffer more serious complications from infections and benefit less from the vaccination than the general population. Scientists have long known that a weakened immune system is to blame but the exact mechanisms behind this lagging immunity have remained largely unknown. Now research led ...


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    HOW TEENS DEAL WITH STRESS MAY AFFECT THEIR BLOOD PRESSURE, IMMUNE SYSTEM

    Dec 13, 2018

    Most teens get stressed out by their families from time to time, but whether they bottle those emotions up or put a positive spin on things may affect certain processes in the body, including blood pressure and how immune cells respond to bacterial invaders, according to Penn State researchers. The ...


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    NEANDERTAL GENES SHED LIGHT ON UNIQUE ASPECTS OF THE MODERN HUMAN BRAIN

    Dec 13, 2018

    A characteristic feature of modern humans is the unusually round skull and brain, in contrast to the elongated shape seen in other human species. By studying Neandertal DNA fragments found in the genomes of living Europeans, scientists have now discovered genes that influence this globular shape. An...


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    STUDY REVEALS NEW LINK BETWEEN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION AND MUTATIONS IN HEART DISEASE GENE

    Dec 11, 2018

    Atrial fibrillation (Afib), a heart condition that causes a rapid, irregular heartbeat that increases a person's risk of stroke and heart failure, is fairly common among older adults. However, its early onset form is relatively rare, affecting less than one percent of Americans under the age of ...


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    RESEARCHERS MAKE SHAPE SHIFTING CELL BREAKTHROUGH

    Dec 11, 2018

    A new computational model developed by researchers from The City College of New York and Yale gives a clearer picture of the structure and mechanics of soft, shape-changing cells that could provide a better understanding of cancerous tumor growth, wound healing, and embryonic development. Mark D. Sh...


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    STOP STERILIZING YOUR DUST ANTIMICROBIAL CHEMICAL TIED TO ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE GENES IN DUST

    Dec 11, 2018

    Most people have heard about antibiotic-resistant germs. But how about antibiotic-resistant dust? A new Northwestern University study has found that an antimicrobial chemical called triclosan is abundant in the dust—and linked to changes in its genetic makeup. The result is dust with organisms...


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    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER UNIQUE IMMUNE CELL LIKELY DRIVES CHRONIC INFLAMMATION

    Dec 11, 2018

    For the first time, researchers have identified that an immune cell subset called gamma delta T cells that may be causing and/or perpetuating the systemic inflammation found in normal aging in the general geriatric population and in HIV-infected people who are responding well to drugs (antiretrovira...


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    SUCCESSFUL ANTI-PD-1 THERAPY REQUIRES INTERACTION BETWEEN CD8+ T CELLS AND DENDRITIC CELLS

    Dec 11, 2018

    A team led by a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigator has found that successful cancer immunotherapy targeting the PD-1 molecule requires interaction between cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, which have been considered the primary therapeutic target, and dendritic cells, critical activators of T c...


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    NEW LIGHT ON BLOCKING SHIGA AND RICIN TOXINS—AND ON AN ICONIC BIOLOGICAL PROCESS

    Dec 10, 2018

    Min Dong, Ph.D., and his lab are world experts in toxins and how to combat them. They've figured out how Clostridium difficile's most potent toxin gets into cells and zeroed in on the first new botulinum toxin identified since 1969. Now, setting their sights on Shiga and ricin toxins, they&#...


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    PHRMA HIGHLIGHTS IMPACT OF CELL AND GENE THERAPIES IN NEW REPORT

    Dec 10, 2018

    Over the past few years, cell and gene therapies have become significant components in the R&D spending of numerous drug companies. And more funding is likely to be devoted to that segment as more and more therapies are approved by global regulatory agencies. This morning the Pharmaceutical Rese...


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    A CODE FOR REPROGRAMMING IMMUNE SENTINELS

    Dec 10, 2018

    For the first time, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has successfully reprogrammed mouse and human skin cells into immune cells called dendritic cells. The process is quick and effective, representing a pioneering contribution for applying direct reprogramming for inducing immunity. Impo...


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    THE GENOME OF GIANT TORTOISE "LONESOME GEORGE" PROVIDES CLUES TO LONGEVITY AND DISEASE RESISTANCE

    Dec 10, 2018

    A few years ago, in 2012, Lonesome George, the last of the Pinta Island tortoises of the Galapagos, died. The last of his kind, George was more than one hundred years old. Researchers published an article in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution today that described preliminary findings of gene...


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    HIGHER RADIATION TOLERANCE FOR PROTEINS IMAGED USING LPEM

    Dec 10, 2018

    Liquid-phase electron microscopy is a technique that can be used to overcome one of the key limitations of electron microscopy – where the electron optics require a high vacuum, and so the sample would need to be in a stable environment. Researchers at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Mat...


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    BACTERIAL 'SLEEPER CELLS' EVADE ANTIBIOTICS AND WEAKEN DEFENCE AGAINST INFECTION

    Dec 07, 2018

    New research from scientists at Imperial College London unravels how so-called bacterial persister cells manipulate our immune cells. The work potentially opens new avenues to finding ways of clearing these bacterial cells from the body and stopping recurrence of the bacterial infection. The latest ...


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    EXCLUSIVE: ORCHARD CEO TOUTS TRANSFORMATIVE POWER OF GENE THERAPY FOLLOWING ASH DATA PRESENTATION

    Dec 07, 2018

    The word transformative is not used lightly by Orchard Therapeutics Chief Executive Officer Mark Rothera. He has seen the lives of children born with rare autoimmune diseases changed dramatically through gene therapies developed by his company. Rothera took over the reins at Orchard in September 201...


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    ELIMINATING THE LATENT RESERVOIR OF HIV

    Dec 07, 2018

    A new study suggests that a genetic switch that causes latent HIV inside cells to begin to replicate can be manipulated to completely eradicate the virus from the human body. Cells harboring latent HIV are "invisible" to the natural defenses of the immune system. The findings, which sugges...


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    MYRIAD STUDY SHOWS BREAST CANCER RECURRENCE TEST CAN PREDICT THERAPY RESPONSES

    Dec 07, 2018

    Myriad Genetics presented new data on its EndoPredict test, saying it can accurately forecast which women with newly diagnosed ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer will see the most benefits from adjunctive chemotherapy. The company also said the test can predict those who will be unlikely to se...


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    MAKING PERSONALIZED CANCER VACCINES TAKES AN ARMY—OF ROBOTS

    Dec 07, 2018

    WHEN MELISSA MOORE was tinkering around with RNA in the early 90s, the young biochemist had to painstakingly construct the genetic molecules by micropipette, just a few building blocks at a time. Inside the MIT lab of Nobel laureate Phil Sharp, it could take days to make just a few drops of RNA, whi...


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    PARROT GENOME ANALYSIS REVEALS INSIGHTS INTO LONGEVITY, COGNITION

    Dec 06, 2018

    Parrots are famously talkative, and a blue-fronted Amazon parrot named Moises—or at least its genome—is telling scientists volumes about the longevity and highly developed cognitive abilities that give parrots so much in common with humans. Perhaps someday, it will also provide clues abo...


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    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER INFORMATION ABOUT A GENE THAT HELPS DEFINE US AS HUMANS

    Dec 06, 2018

    University of Otago researchers has discovered information about a gene that sets primates—great apes and humans—apart from other mammals, through the study of a rare developmental brain disorder. Dr. Adam O'Neill carried out the research as part of his Ph.D. at the University of Ota...


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    HOW MOLECULAR PARTNERS FORM DYNAMIC SCAFFOLDING FOR PROTEIN MACHINERY

    Dec 06, 2018

    Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have mapped key details of how molecular partners regulate the assembly of protein-making factories called ribosomes. The findings, published in the journal Nature Communications, add a piece to the puzzle of ribosome assembly. The results may ...


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    ROCHE AIMS FOR KADCYLA EXPANSION WITH NEW EARLY BREAST CANCER DATA

    Dec 05, 2018

    Roche is hoping to grow sales for new drugs as biosim competition begins to erode its top blockbusters, and now the drugmaker has unveiled new data that just might give its breast cancer drug Kadcyla a boost. At the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium on Wednesday, Roche presented data showing post-...


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    USING WATER AND GOLD, AUSTRALIAN RESEARCHERS DISCOVER ‘UNIVERSAL CANCER BIOMARKER’

    Dec 05, 2018

    Australian researchers at the University of Queensland have discovered a unique DNA structure that appears to be shared by many cancers and could be used to develop a simple diagnostic test that could be performed in under 10 minutes with the naked eye. When circulating tumor DNA fragments are place...


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    SCIENTISTS DESIGN WAY TO TRACK STEPS OF CELLS' DEVELOPMENT

    Dec 05, 2018

    Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a new tool described as a "flight data recorder" for developing cells, illuminating the paths cells take as they progress from one type to another. Scientists hope to one day be able to take skin cells from ...


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    SANOFI MERGES BIOLOGY AND TECH WITH RESEARCH DEAL FOR DIGITAL ASTHMA LAB

    Dec 05, 2018

    Sanofi plans to take asthma research where it has not gone before. A new partnership with Mount Sinai Health System and advanced analytics firm Sema4 will create a digital asthma laboratory where sophisticated digital technology can be applied to and used to gather new forms of real-world and clinic...


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    GLOBAL SEARCH MARKETING AGENCY, DIRECTIVE, ANNOUNCES COMPLETE REBRANDING

    Dec 05, 2018

    Directive, the leading B2B and enterprise search marketing agency, announced today the launch of their new branding to reflect their evolution into a global search marketing agency. Directive’s unique approach to search marketing has positioned the company as the agency of choice for leading B...

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    T-CELLS ENGINEERED TO RECOGNISE TUMOURS EXPRESSING THE CD30 PROTEIN MARKER

    Dec 04, 2018

    Researchers have reported promising early results from a clinical study of an investigational cellular immunotherapy that used a patient’s own, genetically engineered immune cells to recognize and fight Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells. The researchers presented preliminary results from ...


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    THE DISTANCE OF MICROBIAL COMPETITIONS SHAPES THEIR COMMUNITY STRUCTURES

    Dec 04, 2018

    Inside the microbial communities that populate our world, microbes are fighting for their lives. These tiny organisms are in the soil, in the oceans, and in the human body. Microbes play several important roles—they can decompose waste, make oxygen and promote human health. Within communities,...


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    NEW PARKINSON'S DISEASE DRUG TARGET REVEALED THROUGH STUDY OF FATTY ACIDS

    Dec 04, 2018

    The human brain is rich in lipids. Investigators studying Parkinson's disease (PD) have become increasingly interested in lipids since both molecular and genetic studies have pointed to the disruption of the balance of the brain's lipids as a potentially critical contributor to this disease....


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    ELIMINATING MICROGLIA PREVENTS HEIGHTENED IMMUNE SENSITIVITY AFTER STRESS

    Dec 04, 2018

    Using an animal model of chronic stress, researchers at The Ohio State University have shown that the immune cells of the brain, called microglia, hold unique signatures of chronic stress that leave the animal more sensitive to future stressful experiences, evident by increased anxiety and immune re...


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    CLEVER REPURPOSING OF BIOLOGICAL TOOL GIVES RESEARCHERS NEW CLUES AS TO HOW THE FLU REMAINS SO SUCCESSFUL

    Dec 03, 2018

    Scientists have known for decades that a flu virus in a human body can be a lot different than viruses grown in a lab. As opposed to the uniform, spherical, textbook-style viruses in a petri dish, in humans, they vary in shape and composition particularly the abundance of certain proteins even if th...


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    NEW DRUG COMBINATION COULD BE MORE EFFECTIVE AGAINST MELANOMA

    Dec 03, 2018

    A class of cancer drugs called protein kinase inhibitors is one of the most effective treatments for melanoma. However, in many cases, tumors eventually become resistant to the drugs and cause a relapse in the patient. A new study from MIT suggests that combining kinase inhibitors with experimental ...


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    EVOLUTION SANS MUTATION DISCOVERED IN SINGLE-CELLED ARCHAEA

    Dec 03, 2018

    University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers have found revolutionary evidence that an evolutionary phenomenon at work in complex organisms is at play in their single-celled counterparts, too. Species most often evolve through DNA mutations inherited by successive generations. A few decades ago, resea...


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    THE LONG AND SHORT OF CDK12

    Dec 03, 2018

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes pose a serious risk for breast and ovarian cancer because they endanger the genomic stability of a cell by interfering with homologous recombination repair (HR), a key mechanism for accurately repairing harmful double-stranded breaks in DNA. Without the ability...


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    GENENTECH BUYS NASH BIOTECH JECURE

    Nov 29, 2018

    Roche’s Genentech unit has bought California biotech Jecure Therapeutics, which is researching drugs that could be used in inflammatory diseases including the fatty liver disease NASH. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a disease targeted by several pharma companies, who see it as a sourc...


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    WITH THESE NANOPARTICLES, A SIMPLE URINE TEST COULD DIAGNOSE BACTERIAL PNEUMONIA

    Nov 29, 2018

    Pneumonia, a respiratory disease that kills about 50,000 people in the United States every year, can be caused by many different microbes, including bacteria and viruses. Rapid detection of pneumonia is critical for effective treatment, especially in hospital-acquired cases which are often more seve...


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    INCONSPICUOUS PROTEIN KEY TO DEADLY BLOOD CANCER

    Nov 29, 2018

    Five percent of acute leukemia cases are diagnosed as mixed lineage leukemia (MLL). MLL is an aggressive blood cancer that predominantly occurs in infants and has been difficult to treat. Now, researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have identified a very common protein as the single key...


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    MECHANISM SAFEGUARDING UNIQUE EPIGENOME OF OOCYTES AND MATERNAL FERTILITY

    Nov 29, 2018

    In mammals, females have a limited supply of oocytes. Oocytes have a unique epigenome with approximately half the DNA methylation of sperm, and the most terminally differentiated somatic cells. Until recently, regulators of this unique DNA methylation pattern and its functional significance were unk...


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    LIFESTYLE CHANGES HELP GENETICALLY PREDISPOSED CHILDREN BEAT OBESITY

    Nov 28, 2018

    Obesity constitutes an increasing global problem that may lead to serious sequelae such as heart attacks, diabetes, and cancer. In 2016, 124 million children and adolescents worldwide suffered from obesity. Now researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the Children’s Obesity Clinic, th...


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    DNA WITH A TWIST

    Nov 28, 2018

    DNA replication is vital to all lifeforms, but in some organisms, it can be prevented by twists in the DNA sequence, called 'supercoils'. If too many supercoils are allowed to build up, cells vital to sustaining life will die. A molecular machine, called DNA gyrase, which is found in bacteri...


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    SMALL MOLECULE PROMOTES REMOVAL OF EXCESS CHOLESTEROL

    Nov 28, 2018

    Scientists have determined the structure of the activated form of an enzyme that helps to return excess cholesterol to the liver, a study in eLife reports. The research reveals how a drug-like chemical stimulates the action of the lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) enzyme. It also suggests...


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    PLACENTAL CELL SUBTYPES UNCOVERED BY MICROFLUIDICS ANALYSIS

    Nov 28, 2018

    To treat and prevent pregnancy-related disorders, researchers must understand not only what can go wrong, but when. Complications, such as preeclampsia and pre-term birth, often occur in the second or third trimester, and most research to date has focused on those later stages of pregnancy. But the ...


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    MECHANISM COULD AID METHODS TO COMBAT IMMUNE ATTACKS ON THE BODY

    Nov 27, 2018

    A genetic regulatory mechanism may shape the immune system’s ability to fight viral infections, and play a key role in autoimmune diseases that occur when immune cells attack bodily tissues. The study, led by researchers at NYU School of Medicine found that chemical changes to key spots on mes...


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    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER CLUES TO BRAIN CHANGES IN DEPRESSION

    Nov 27, 2018

    In new pre-clinical research, scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), led by Scott Thompson, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology, have identified changes in brain activity linked to the pleasure and reward system. The research, published in the journal, Nature, provides new i...


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    SINGLE-CELL ASYMMETRIES CONTROL HOW GROUPS OF CELLS FORM 3-D SHAPES TOGETHER

    Nov 27, 2018

    Scientists have developed a mathematical model showing that two types of cellular asymmetry, or 'polarity', govern the shaping of cells into sheets and tubes, according to an article in eLife. The research is a major advance in understanding the processes that allow a single cell to develop ...


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    PATIENTS WITH RARE NATURAL ABILITY TO SUPPRESS HIV SHED LIGHT ON POTENTIAL FUNCTIONAL CURE

    Nov 27, 2018

    Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified two patients with HIV whose immune cells behave differently than others with the virus and actually appear to help control viral load even years after infection. Moreover, both patients carry large amounts of virus in infected cells but show no viral load...


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    RESEARCH GROUP SUGGESTS IT MIGHT BE TIME TO BUILD A UNIVERSAL GENETIC DATABASE

    Nov 26, 2018

    A team of researchers from Vanderbilt University is suggesting in a Policy Forum piece published in the journal Science that it might be time to start building a universal genetic database. They suggest doing so would help law enforcement personnel track down criminals. A universal genetic database ...


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    SCIENTISTS UNVEIL PROMISING NEW HIV VACCINE STRATEGY

    Nov 26, 2018

    A new candidate HIV vaccine from Scripps Research surmounts technical hurdles that stymied previous vaccine efforts and stimulates a powerful anti-HIV antibody response in animal tests. The new vaccine strategy, described in a paper on November 23 in Science Advances, is based on the HIV envelope pr...


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    USING PHOTOPLETHYSMOGRAPHY SIGNAL FOR MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF ARTERIAL BLOOD PRESSURE

    Nov 26, 2018

    A team of researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Texas Southwestern have recently developed a new method to estimate systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), and mean (MBP) blood pressure waveforms from photoplethysmography (PPG) signals. PPG is a simple, low-cost, and non...


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    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER NEURAL CODE THAT PREDICTS BEHAVIOR

    Nov 26, 2018

    Scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have found that neurons in the superior colliculus, an ancient midbrain structure found in all vertebrates, are key players in allowing us to detect visual objects and events. This structure doesn't help us recognize what the specific object or even...


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    BREAKTHROUGH AS MOLECULES SHOWN TO 'AIR-KISS' WHEN BRAIN NEURONS ATTRACT EACH OTHER

    Nov 26, 2018

    All brain cells 'air-kiss' before they come together to form a final synaptic relationship, new research by University scientists has revealed. The breakthrough study reveals that molecular signaling within the brain operates in a very different way to previously thought, with cells now foun...


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    UK BIOTECH AIMS TO CUT COSTS WITH DIGITAL AND ROBOTICS INVESTMENT

    Nov 23, 2018

    Gene and cell therapy firm Oxford Biomedica is to invest £4 million to build digital and robotics capabilities that will help manufacture the next generation of cutting-edge therapies. The group will invest the money, supported by a £2 million grant from Innovate UK to upgrade its techno...


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    MITOCHONDRIA'S LITTLE HELPERS

    Nov 23, 2018

    The research labs of the associate professor (Privatdozent) Dr. Thomas Becker and Prof. Dr. Nikolaus Pfanner teamed up with several other researchers at the University of Freiburg to discover a mechanism inside cells that transport proteins to the mitochondria. Their research has now been published ...


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    POO-TESTING FOR COLORECTAL CANCER IMPROVES OUTCOMES FOR MEN

    Nov 23, 2018

    While screening for colorectal cancer did not, so far, reduce mortality, it did reduce the need for chemotherapy and emergency surgeries among male patients. Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the world. Every year in Finland, approximately 3,000 new cases are diagnosed, an...


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    DNA ORIGAMI PACKED FULL OF POTENT ANTICANCER AGENTS

    Nov 23, 2018

    One of the most successful techniques to combat multidrug resistance in cancer cells is the downregulation of those genes responsible for drug resistance. Chinese scientists have now developed a nanoplatform that selectively delivers small hairpin RNA transcription templates and chemotherapeutics in...


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    PREBIOTIC SUPPLEMENT MAY BE EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVE TO REDUCE GI DISTURBANCES IN AUTISTIC CHILDREN

    Nov 22, 2018

    Diets free from gluten and casein are often recommended as a way to reduce gastrointestinal (GI) problems in children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD). GI symptoms are of particular interest in these patients due to the correlation and prevalence with the severity of behavioral traits. But a n...


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    RESEARCHERS SUCCESSFULLY RESTORE SENSE OF VISION IN BLIND PEOPLE USING BVT'S BIONIC EYE

    Nov 22, 2018

    Bionic Vision Technologies Pty Ltd (BVT) today announced medical researchers had successfully restored a sense of vision in four blind people with its bionic eye as part of a clinical trial in Melbourne. Researchers said they were “very pleased” with the progress of all four patients who...


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    METASTATIC BREAST CANCER PATIENTS FEEL ISOLATED AND NEED MORE SUPPORT FROM HCPS, REPORT REVEALS

    Nov 22, 2018

    A new report, entitled MBC Radio Silence, released today highlights that people with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) feel isolated and in need of more support to deal with their diagnosis, and there is a growing need for healthcare professionals (HCPs) to manage both the physical and emotional aspect...


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    NEVER-BEFORE-SEEN DNA RECOMBINATION IN THE BRAIN LINKED TO ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

    Nov 21, 2018

    Scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have identified gene recombination in neurons that produce thousands of new gene variants within Alzheimer's disease brains. The study, published today in Nature, reveals for the first time how the Alzheimer's-linked ge...


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    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER KEY GENE IN CELLS ASSOCIATED WITH AGE-RELATED HEARING LOSS

    Nov 21, 2018

    An international group of researchers, led by Ronna Hertzano, MD, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Anatomy and Neurobiology, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), and Michael Bowl, Ph.D., Programme Leader Track Scientist, Mamm...


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    ROIVANT TAKES AIM AT RESISTANT INFECTIONS WITH $667.5M INTRON DEAL

    Nov 21, 2018

    Fresh from a $200 million fundraising that pushed its valuation above $7 billion, Relevant Sciences has spent more money on its R&D portfolio, licensing a midstage drug for resistant bacteria from South Korea’s Intron Biotechnology. Vivek Ramaswamy’s fast-growing biotech group is pay...


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    SYNTHEGO EXPANDS CRISPR KIT REACH WITH EUROFINS DISTRIBUTION DEAL

    Nov 20, 2018

    Synthego has tapped Eurofins Genomics to distribute synthetic single guide RNA (sgRNA) products from its CRISPR evolution line of genome-editing kits. The partnership adds Eurofins customers in 44 countries to Synthego’s market, which, until now, was concentrated in the U.S. The Redwood City, ...


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    STUDY INVESTIGATES HOW MDMA AFFECTS COOPERATION AND TRUST

    Nov 20, 2018

    The drug MDMA makes people more cooperative toward those they trust, according to new research. The finding offers new insights into how MDMA could aid the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. Commonly known as ecstasy or Molly, MDMA is a synthetic compound that alters perception and mood by...


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    GLUCOSE BINDING MOLECULE COULD TRANSFORM THE TREATMENT OF DIABETES

    Nov 19, 2018

    Scientists from the University of Bristol have designed a new synthetic glucose binding molecule platform that brings us one step closer to the development of the world's first glucose-responsive insulin which, say, researchers, will transform the treatment of diabetes. The World Health Organiza...


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    FREEZE-FRAME MICROSCOPY CAPTURES MOLECULE'S 'LOCK-AND-LOAD' ON DNA

    Nov 19, 2018

    Pushing the limits of cryo-electron microscopy, University of California, Berkeley, scientists have captured freeze-frames of the changing shape of a huge molecule, one of the body's key molecular machines, as it locks onto DNA and loads the machinery for reading the genetic code. The molecule, ...


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    COULD A COMBO OF CANCER DRUGS FOR ADULTS ALSO TREAT NEUROBLASTOMA IN CHILDREN?

    Nov 16, 2018

    Novartis’ Farydak was approved by the FDA to treat multiple myeloma in 2015. Now scientists in Australia believe the drug can be combined with an early-phase clinical agent to tackle neuroblastoma, a type of nerve tissue cancer mostly seen in young children. Professor Murray Norris and his col...


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    NEW WAY TO LOOK AT CELL MEMBRANES COULD CHANGE THE WAY WE STUDY DISEASE

    Nov 16, 2018

    A new technique to study intact parts of cell membranes could revolutionize studies of cancer, metabolic and heart diseases. Membranes protect all of our cells and the organelles inside them, including the mitochondria – the powerhouse of the cell. These membranes are studded with biological m...

    IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON
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    DRAMATIC INCREASE IN E-CIGARETTE USE AMONG YOUTH

    Nov 15, 2018

    Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new findings from the National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS) showing that more than 3.6 million middle and high school students were current (past 30 day) e-cigarette users in 2018, a dramat...


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    VACCINE REPURPOSING MAY SAVE MILLIONS OF DOGS

    Nov 15, 2018

    A vaccine used to prevent dogs from contracting the deadly, parasitic disease canine leishmaniasis also can be used to treat currently infected dogs, found Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Iowa, providing a new avenue of treatment for millions of infected dogs globall...


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    MOSQUITO GENOME OPENS NEW AVENUES FOR REDUCING BUG-BORNE DISEASE

    Nov 14, 2018

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is powerful, plentiful species: It populates six continents, can carry deadly viruses, and bites with abandon. But until recently, its genome was in tatters. For the past decade, researchers attempting to study the mosquito's DNA had only fragments to work with—g...


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    ZIKA MAY HIJACK MOTHER-FETUS IMMUNITY ROUTE

    Nov 14, 2018

    To cross the placenta, Zika virus may hijack the route by which acquired immunity is transferred from mother to fetus, new research suggests. The results are scheduled for publication in Cell Host & Microbe. Antibodies against dengue virus make it easier for Zika to infect certain immune cells i...


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    HUMAN CELL ATLAS STUDY REVEALS MATERNAL IMMUNE SYSTEM MODIFICATIONS IN EARLY PREGNANCY

    Nov 14, 2018

    The first Human Cell Atlas study of early pregnancy in humans has shown how the function of the maternal immune system is affected by cells from the developing placenta. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Newcastle University and the University of Cambridge used genomics and bioinformat...


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    KYMERA NETS $65M TO MOVE LEAD PROTEIN DEGRADER INTO THE CLINIC

    Nov 13, 2018

    Kymera Therapeutics raised $65 million in series B funding that will support the clinical development of its lead protein degradation program, as well as advance its other preclinical assets. CEO Laurent Audoly kept mum on specific targets and indications, saying that “at this point, what we a...


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    'WALTZING' NANOPARTICLES COULD ADVANCE SEARCH FOR BETTER DRUG DELIVERY METHODS

    Nov 13, 2018

    Indiana University researchers have discovered that drug-delivering nanoparticles attach to their targets differently based upon their position when they meet like ballroom dancers who change their moves with the music. The study, published Nov. 13 in the journal ACS Nano, is significant since the &...


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    'SCARING' SOYBEANS INTO DEFENSIVE MODE YIELDS BETTER PLANTS A GENERATION LATER

    Nov 13, 2018

    y temporarily silencing the expression of a critical gene, researchers fooled soybean plants into sensing they were under siege, encountering a wide range of stresses. Then, after selectively crossbreeding those plants with the original stock, the progeny "remember" the stress-induced resp...


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    NANOSCAFFOLD DEVELOPED TO ENHANCE CNS STEM CELL THERAPY

    Nov 12, 2018

    Rutgers scientists have created a tiny, biodegradable scaffold to transplant stem cells and deliver drugs, which may help treat Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, aging brain degeneration, spinal cord injuries, and traumatic brain injuries. Stem cell transplantation, which shows promise a...


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    PRIMATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ANCIENT DNA REVEALS HISTORY OF MYSTERY MONKEY

    Nov 12, 2018

    Analysis of ancient DNA of a mysterious extinct monkey named Xenothrix which displays bizarre body characteristics very different to any living monkey has revealed that it was, in fact, most closely related to South America's titi monkeys (Callicebinae). Having made their way overwater to Jamaic...


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    MUTATIONS, CRISPR, AND THE BIOLOGY BEHIND MOVEMENT DISORDERS

    Nov 12, 2018

    Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) in Japan have discovered how mutations related to a group of movement disorders produce their effects. Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study found three ways in which mutations affecting the IP3R1 protein can af...


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    RESEARCHERS EXPLAIN THE ORIGIN OF THE MYSTERIOUS PERIODICITY OF THE GENOME

    Nov 02, 2018

    Scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) have found an explanation for a periodicity in the sequence of the genomes of all eukaryotes, from yeast to humans. The results published in the journal Cell offer an alternative explanation to the one based on natural selection...


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    UNRAVELING A GENETIC NETWORK LINKED TO AUTISM

    Nov 02, 2018

    Donnelly Centre researchers have uncovered a genetic network linked to autism. The findings, described in the journal Molecular Cell, will facilitate developing new therapies for this common neurological disorder.
    As part of a collaborative research program focusing on autism led by Benjamin ...

    UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
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    CELLULAR ATLAS OF BRAIN REGION LEADS RESEARCHERS TO NEW DISCOVERIES

    Nov 02, 2018

    For decades, scientists have viewed the brain as a veritable black box—and now Catherine Dulac and Xiaowei Zhuang are poised to open it. Dulac, the Higgins Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Lee and Ezpeleta Professor of Arts and Sciences, and Zhuang, the David B. Arnold Jr. Profe...


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    ROAD TO CELL DEATH MORE CLEARLY IDENTIFIED FOR PARKINSON'S DISEASE

    Nov 01, 2018

    In experiments performed in mice, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified the cascade of cell death events leading to the physical and intellectual degeneration associated with Parkinson's disease. Results of the study, published Nov. 2 in Science, suggest promising new targets for...


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    MAKING A MAP OF THE BRAIN—FIRST-OF-ITS-KIND CELLULAR ATLAS IDENTIFIES NEURON TYPES, LOCATION AND EVEN FUNCTION

    Nov 01, 2018

    For decades, scientists have viewed the brain as a veritable black box—and now Catherine Dulac and Xiaowei Zhuang are poised to open it. Dulac, the Higgins Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Lee and Ezpeleta Professor of Arts and Sciences, and Zhuang, the David B. Arnold, Jr. Prof...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=21752175

    FORTY SEVEN’S ANTI-CD47 COMBO SHOWS PROMISE IN NON-HODGKIN LYMPHOMA

    Nov 01, 2018

    An immunotherapy combining Roche’s blood cancer drug Rituxan and an anti-CD47 drug developed at Stanford University shrank the cancers of half the patients in a small phase 1 trial. The patients, who had non-Hodgkin lymphoma, had all either failed or relapsed after undergoing at least two othe...

    AMIRAH AL IDRUS
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=21762176

    CHROMATIN STUDY UNEARTHS LINK BETWEEN DNA-PROTEIN BINDING AND CANCER

    Oct 31, 2018

    A team of scientists led by Stanford University School of Medicine has identified a link between how proteins bind to our DNA and how cancer develops. This finding may allow researchers to predict cancer pathways and long-term patient outcomes.
    The research focuses on chromatin – the co...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=21682168

    IS IT BRAIN INFECTION OR CANCER? A NEW RAPID TEST COULD HOLD THE ANSWER

    Oct 31, 2018

    When patients present with neurologic symptoms such as severe headaches or seizures, the symptoms could suggest anything from infection, cancer, or an autoimmune disease of the brain or spinal cord, leaving physicians scrambling to find the cause in a short amount of time. The differences in diagnos...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=21692169

    SINGLE PROTEIN CONTROLS THOUSANDS OF GENES ESSENTIAL FOR SPERM DEVELOPMENT

    Oct 30, 2018

    A single protein regulates a battery of key genes inside developing sperm, according to a new study out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Scientists discovered the protein called Dazl controls a network of genes essential for developing sperm to replicate and survive. The findin...

    CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY
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    DICERNA AGREES ANOTHER GENE-SILENCING DEAL, THIS TIME WITH LILLY

    Oct 30, 2018

    Eli Lilly has agreed on a broad collaboration with Dicerna, sealing the deal with a $100 million equity stake in the RNA interference specialist. The big pharma company is also paying $100 million upfront to Dicerna in licensing and research fees for the project, which will see the two companies wor...


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    RNA-PROTEIN NETWORK MAY EXPLAIN WHY MELANOMA GROWS MORE

    Oct 29, 2018

    With five-year survival rates being around 30 percent for patients with distant metastatic disease, cutaneous melanoma is the leading cause of skin cancer-related deaths. The major causes of the low survival rate for melanoma patients are the limited number of options for patients lacking the BRAF m...

    TOKYO UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURE AND TECHNOLOGY
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=21582158

    USING THE MICROBIOME TO HELP PREMATURE BABIES GROW

    Oct 29, 2018

    About half of babies born prematurely struggle to grow, putting them at risk of health problems that can last a lifetime. Despite years of research, physicians lack a method that consistently helps these infants thrive. A study suggests that the gut microbiome – the trillions of tiny bacteria ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=21592159

    STUDY IDENTIFIES LINK BETWEEN DNA-PROTEIN BINDING, CANCER ONSET

    Oct 25, 2018

    Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators at other institutions have identified a link between how proteins bind to our DNA and how cancer develops. This finding may allow researchers to predict cancer pathways and long-term patient outcomes.
    The resear...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=21532153

    HOW SLEEPING MAMMARY STEM CELLS ARE AWAKENED IN PUBERTY

    Oct 25, 2018

    Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have discovered how the growth of milk-producing mammary glands is triggered during puberty. Sleeping stem cells in the mammary gland are awoken by a protein dubbed FoxP1, according to the research that was published today in the journal Developmental Cell...


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    TARGETING COLD AND NICOTINE RECEPTORS SLIMS OBESE MICE

    Oct 24, 2018

    Inspired by some of the effects of winter swimming and smoking, researchers from the University of Copenhagen, among others, have found a way to improve the metabolism of mice and make them lose weight. They have done so by stimulating the body’s cold and nicotinic receptors.
    Obesity is...


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    PEPTIDE EXPLOITS ACHILLES' HEEL OF ZIKA VIRUS

    Oct 24, 2018

    Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have engineered an antiviral peptide that exploits the Zika virus at its Achilles' heel the viral membrane hence stopping the virus from causing severe infections. This new method of attacking the viral membrane focuses on...


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    STUDY PROVIDES INSIGHT INTO HOW NANOPARTICLES INTERACT WITH BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    Oct 18, 2018

    Personal electronic devices—smartphones, computers, TVs, tablets, screens of all kinds—are a significant and growing source of the world's electronic waste. Many of these products use nanomaterials, but little is known about how these modern materials and their tiny particles interac...


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    RESEARCH GIVES NEW INSIGHT INTO THE EVOLUTION OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM

    Oct 18, 2018

    Pioneering research has given a fascinating fresh insight into how animal nervous systems evolved from simple structures to become the complex network transmitting signals between different parts of the body. The new study used simple multicellular organisms called Placozoa to reveal the beginnings ...


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    RESEARCHERS USE NOVEL MACHINE LEARNING STRATEGY TO ACCELERATE BRAIN-COMPUTER INTERFACE TRAINING

    Oct 17, 2018

    Brain-computer interfaces are typically systems which measure neural activity and convert it into an artificial output. These systems have shown great potential for assisted movement in patients with motor impairments. The interfaces typically work by directing the patient to think about making a mo...


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    NEAR-ATOMIC RESOLUTION MODEL OF EBOLA VIRUS PROTEIN BRINGS CLEARER UNDERSTANDING OF THE VIRAL MECHANICS

    Oct 17, 2018

    Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have for the first time imaged the structure of a central component of the Ebola virus at near-atomic resolution. The study, published in the journal Nature, was led by Prof. Matthias Wolf and primary author Dr...


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    HOW COMMUNICATION AMONG CELLS AFFECTS DEVELOPMENT OF MULTICELLULAR TISSUE

    Oct 16, 2018

    Using a combination of computational modeling and experimental techniques, a research team has developed new information about how intercellular communication affects the differentiation of an embryonic stem cell colony over time.
    By providing new information about the role of communication a...

    GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
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    STUDY REVEALS BEST USE OF WILDFLOWERS TO BENEFIT CROPS ON FARMS

    Oct 16, 2018

    With bee pollinators in decline and pesky crop pests lowering yields, sustainable and organic farmers need environmentally friendly solutions. One strategy is to border crops with wildflower plantings to attract pollinators and pest predators. But scientists have suggested that such plantings may on...

    CORNELL UNIVERSITY
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    AUSTRALIAN TEAM DISCOVERS HOW ONE ORDERLY PROTEIN PROTECTS AGAINST CANCER

    Oct 15, 2018

    Oncology researchers have long believed the protein Pax5 is merely a “transcription factor,” meaning it helps cells transcribe vital genetic information. But scientists in Australia believe they’ve uncovered evidence that Pax5 actually plays a much bigger role in the body: It organ...

    ARLENE WEINTRAUB
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    STUDY TRACES HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED BLOODSTREAM INFECTIONS TO PATIENTS' OWN BODIES

    Oct 15, 2018

    The most common source of a bloodstream infection acquired during a hospital stay is not a nurse's or doctor's dirty hands, or another patient's sneeze or visitor's cough, but the patient's own gut, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have found. Most patients wh...

    STANFORD UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER
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    HEALTH AND BALANCE OF THE GUT MICROBIOTA IS IMPORTANT IN THE PROGRESSION OF BACTERIAL INFECTION

    Oct 12, 2018

    The health and balance of the gut microbiota are important in the progression of a bacterial infection, according to new research. A new study, led by the University of Glasgow and published in Nature Communications, found that disease-causing bacteria were taking signals from the host's gut mic...


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    THE SIGNIFICANCE OF WATER IN A PROMISING BIOMARKER AGAINST CANCER

    Oct 12, 2018

    The Tn antigen appears in 90 percent of cancers and is associated with metastasis. Thus, it is a promising biomarker for identifying cancer cells and has become a very attractive target in therapies to fight cancer, according to Emilio José Cocinero, member of the UPV/EHU's Department of ...


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    MOUSE PUPS WITH SAME-SEX PARENTS BORN IN CHINA USING STEM CELLS AND GENE EDITING

    Oct 11, 2018

    Researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences were able to produce healthy mice with two mothers that went on to have normal offspring of their own. Mice from two dads were also born but only survived for a couple of days. The work, presented October 11 in the journal Cell Stem Cell, looks at what ...


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    RESEARCHERS MODIFY CRISPR TO REORGANIZE GENOME

    Oct 11, 2018

    Researchers at Stanford University have reworked CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology to manipulate the genome in three-dimensional space, allowing them to ferry genetic snippets to different locations in a cell's nucleus. The new technique, dubbed CRISPR-genome organization or simply CRISPR-GO, ...

    STANFORD UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER
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    NEURON DEATH IN ALS MORE COMPLEX THAN PREVIOUSLY THOUGHT

    Oct 09, 2018

    Brown University researchers have uncovered new clues about the progression of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a surprisingly common disease that causes the death of motor neurons that control voluntary muscles such as those involved in walking, talking, chewing or breathing. A team led by Anne...


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    KNOW YOUR ENEMY—LAB BUILDS AN ARSENAL TO FIGHT ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANT BACTERIA

    Oct 09, 2018

    To fight your enemies, it helps to know their weaknesses. And, the more specific your knowledge, the easier it is to undermine their defenses. If your enemy sits safely behind a giant wall, for example, its valuable to know how your foe constructed it, what materials they used, and what cracks you c...


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    BIODEGRADABLE IMPLANT PROVIDES ELECTRICAL STIMULATION THAT SPEEDS NERVE REGENERATION

    Oct 08, 2018

    Researchers at Northwestern University and Washington University School of Medicine have developed the first example of a bioelectronic medicine: an implantable, biodegradable wireless device that speeds nerve regeneration and improves the healing of a damaged nerve.
    The collaborators—m...


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    WHEN YESTERDAY'S AGRICULTURE FEEDS TODAY'S WATER POLLUTION

    Oct 08, 2018

    A study led by researchers at Université de Montréal quantifies for the first time the maximum amount of nutrients specifically, phosphorus that can accumulate in a watershed before additional pollution is discharged into downriver ecosystems.
    That average threshold amount is 2....


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    CHEMISTS ADVANCE ABILITY TO CONTROL CHEMICAL REACTIONS

    Oct 05, 2018

    Scientists at the University of Toronto have found a way to select the outcome of the chemical reaction by employing an elusive and long-sought factor known as the 'impact parameter'.
    The team of U of T chemists, led by Nobel Prize-winning researcher John Polanyi, have found a means t...


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    EUROPEAN BIOTECH FUNDING ON TRACK FOR RECORD YEAR

    Oct 05, 2018

    The European biotech sector is on track to break its annual funding record, according to BioWorld. After a big third quarter, the total for the first nine months of the year stands at $6.3 billion, putting the region on course to clear the $8 billion bar.
    European biotechs made a solid start ...


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    VIRUSES IN BLOOD LEAD TO DIGESTIVE PROBLEMS

    Oct 04, 2018

    While studying viruses best known for infecting the brain, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis stumbled upon clues to a conundrum involving a completely different part of the anatomy: the bowel, and why some people possibly develop digestive problems seemingly out of...


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    HOW A MACHINE COULD MARK THE TURNING POINT FOR DNA DATA STORAGE

    Oct 04, 2018

    Guzzling, devouring, the words fail to reflect the enormity of it all. Data storage eats up cities' worth of power. Back in March, 3M ran a presentation about data, reminding us there was not going to be anything like a slowing down of data, and then posed the question, ok, so how do we swallow ...


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    IMMUNE CELLS HELP OLDER MUSCLES HEAL LIKE NEW

    Oct 03, 2018

    Biomedical engineers at Duke University have found a critical component for growing self-healing muscle tissues from adult muscle—the immune system. The discovery in mice is expected to play an important role in studying degenerative muscle diseases and enhancing the survival of engineered tis...

    KEN KINGERY FOR DUKE UNIVERSITY
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    AVROBIO SLUMPS ON FABRY GENE THERAPY DATA

    Oct 02, 2018

    Shares in Avrobio were halved after the company reported results from the first three patients on its Fabry disease gene therapy, even though one was able to be weaned off enzyme replacement therapy. Although there were signs of efficacy and a tolerable safety profile with AVR-RD-01, investors were ...


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    NEW TECHNOLOGY COULD HELP PEOPLE WITH PARALYSIS TO SPEAK AGAIN

    Oct 01, 2018

    Scientists are close to devising technology that uses the brain's encoding and muscle control commands to allow people who have lost the power of speech due to paralysis to talk again. Recent research led by Northwestern University in Evanston, IL, finds that the brain generates speech sounds in...


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    FORBION CLOSES FOURTH EU-FOCUSED BIOTECH FUND AT €360M

    Oct 01, 2018

    Forbion has closed its fourth fund at €360 million ($417 million). The addition of €90 million since the first close in July means Forbion has pulled in almost twice as much money as it managed for its third fund. Dutch VC shop Forbion set out to raise €250 million for its fourth fund...


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    WE MAY NOT NEED TO RELY ON ANTIBIOTICS TO TREAT UTIS

    Sep 27, 2018

    Doctors tend to prescribe antibiotics to treat common bacterial infections, such as those of the urinary tract. However, a new study shows that there may be a new strategy to reduce or potentially even eliminate the need for using antibiotics.
    The new findings were recently published in the P...

    MONICA BEYER
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    BACTERIA’S HIBERNATION AND EATING HABITS SPARK NEW IDEAS FOR TACKLING RESISTANT INFECTIONS

    Sep 27, 2018

    To effectively combat stubborn infections, drug developers need to better understand why bacteria are able to evade destruction with antibiotics. One team at the University of Copenhagen has discovered a surprising talent that some bacteria have that allows them to resist antibiotic attacks: hiberna...


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    IMMUNE CELL PRUNING OF DOPAMINE RECEPTORS MAY MODULATE BEHAVIORAL CHANGES IN ADOLESCENCE

    Sep 25, 2018

    A study by MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) researchers finds that the immune cells of the brain called microglia to play a crucial role in brain development during adolescence, but that role is different in males and females. The study, conducted in animal models and published online in Na...


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    GENOME DUPLICATION DRIVES EVOLUTION OF SPECIES

    Sep 25, 2018

    Polyploid plants have a duplicate set of chromosomes. As a result, large-scale genetic changes are therefore possible in the new species, making it more adaptable in comparison with the parental species, as has now been demonstrated by researchers using rockcress.

    Many wild and cultivated p...

    UNIVERSITY OF ZURICH
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    INFECTIOUS BACTERIA HIBERNATE TO EVADE ANTIBIOTICS

    Sep 25, 2018

    University of Copenhagen researchers has discovered a surprising tactic of pathogenic bacteria when being attacked by antibiotics: hibernation. Almost all pathogenic bacteria develop a small number of antibiotic-tolerant variants. This means that a significant fraction of bacteria survives courses o...


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    MICROBUBBLE-SHOOTING ALGAE SKELETONS KILL BACTERIAL BIOFILMS

    Sep 24, 2018

    Biofilms are groups of bacteria that clump together and protect each other. They are the cause of all sorts of infections, and because cleansers and antibiotics have a lot of difficulty dealing with them there’s been a search for new solutions. Though biofilms do from inside the body, they are...


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    BREAST MILK MAY BE BEST FOR PREMATURE BABIES' BRAIN DEVELOPMENT

    Sep 21, 2018

    Babies born before their due date show better brain development when fed breast milk rather than formula, a study has found. Experts say that helping mothers to provide breast milk in the weeks after giving birth could improve long-term outcomes for children born pre-term. Premature birth has been l...


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    RESEARCHERS EXPLORE HOW CHANGES IN DIET ALTER MICROBIOME IN ARTIFICIAL INTESTINE

    Sep 21, 2018

    Using an artificial intestine they created, researchers have shown that the microbiome can quickly adapt from the bacterial equivalent of a typical western diet to one composed exclusively of dietary fats. That adaptation involved an increase in the populations of fatty-acid metabolizing species and...


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    ANTI-CANCER DRUGS MAY HOLD KEY TO OVERCOMING ANTIMALARIAL DRUG RESISTANCE

    Sep 20, 2018

    Scientists have found a way to boost the efficacy of the world's most powerful antimalarial drug with the help of chemotherapy medicines, according to new research published in the journal Nature Communications. Scientists from the University of Melbourne and the Japanese pharmaceutical company ...

    UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE
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    INTESTINES MODIFY THEIR CELLULAR STRUCTURE IN RESPONSE TO DIET

    Sep 20, 2018

    Body organs such as the intestine and ovaries undergo structural changes in response to dietary nutrients that can have lasting impacts on metabolism, as well as cancer susceptibility, according to Carnegie's Rebecca Obniski, Matthew Sieber, and Allan Spradling.
    Their work, published by D...

    CARNEGIE INSTITUTION FOR SCIENCE
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    SCIENTISTS EXAMINE VARIATIONS IN A CELL'S PROTEIN FACTORY

    Sep 19, 2018

    You can think of a cell in your body like a miniature factory, creating a final product called proteins, which carry out various tasks and functions. In this cellular factory, genes control the series of sequential steps needed to create proteins, much like an assembly line moving a product along to...

    GLADSTONE INSTITUTES
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    DEVICE TO CORRAL VIABLE SPERM MAY SPEED IVF PROCESS

    Sep 18, 2018

    For couples hoping for a baby via in vitro fertilization, chances have improved. A process that once took hours now takes minutes: Cornell University scientists have created a microfluidic device that quickly corrals strong and speedy sperm viable for fertilization. Conventional methods to separate ...

    CORNELL UNIVERSITY
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    CRISPR THERAPEUTICS, VIACYTE TEAM UP ON GENE-EDITED DIABETES TREATMENT

    Sep 17, 2018

    Just two weeks after launching the first company-backed trial of a CRISPR treatment, CRISPR Therapeutics inked a deal with ViaCyte to develop off-the-shelf, gene-edited stem cell therapies for diabetes. ViaCyte is picking up $15 million upfront, with a potential $10 million to follow.
    ViaCyte...


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    GENENTECH ANTIBIOTIC SHOWS BROAD ACTIVITY AGAINST MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT BUGS IN MICE

    Sep 17, 2018

    When it comes to antibiotic-resistant bacteria, so-called Gram-negative bugs are the most worrisome to scientists and drug developers. That’s because these bacteria have not one but two membranes that shield them against antibiotic attacks.
    Scientists at Genentech have found a way to pe...


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    COCHLEAR NEURON DISCOVERY COULD YIELD NEW TREATMENTS FOR HEARING LOSS

    Sep 13, 2018

    Neurons in the inner ear were thought to fall into two categories: type 1 and type 2. But scientists from Karolinska Institutet have discovered that type 1 neurons a heterogeneous group actually comprise three distinct subtypes of neurons. The findings could help researchers better understand the ne...


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    OPTIMIZING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DISCOVERING CANCER CELL MUTATIONS

    Sep 10, 2018

    Cancer cells often have mutations in their DNA that can give scientists clues about how cancer started or which treatment may be most effective. Finding these mutations can be difficult, but a new method may offer more complete, comprehensive results. A team of researchers has developed a new framew...


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    FDA CLEARS BAXTER’S PREPACKAGED SYNTHETIC BONE FILLER GRAFT

    Sep 07, 2018

    Baxter International received an FDA clearance for a new formulation of its Actifuse synthetic bone graft substitute, now deliverable via a prepackaged syringe that requires no mixing or preparation.
    For use in a variety of orthopedic surgeries, Actifuse Flow uses the same silicate-substituti...


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    'MINDFUL PEOPLE' FEEL LESS PAIN; MRI IMAGING PINPOINTS SUPPORTING BRAIN ACTIVITY

    Sep 07, 2018

    Ever wonder why some people seem to feel less pain than others? A study conducted at Wake Forest School of Medicine may have found one of the answers to mindfulness. "Mindfulness is related to being aware of the present moment without too much emotional reaction or judgment," said the stud...


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    HU-MANITY.CO LAUNCHES BLOCKCHAIN APP TO HELP USERS SELL THEIR HEALTHCARE DATA

    Sep 06, 2018

    Humanity.co has launched a new smartphone app that acts as a global ledger where people can stake claims to their personal data. The company is starting by treating healthcare data as a personal property right.
    Powered by IBM’s blockchain technology, the ledger will log people’s a...


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    INSCRIPTA PICKS UP SOLANA TO COMMERCIALIZE GENE-EDITING TOOLS

    Sep 06, 2018

    Inscripta will acquire Solana Biosciences to ramp up the commercialization of its gene-editing technology. The Boulder, Colorado-based biotech aims to broaden access to CRISPR by offering new enzymes for free and to boost CRISPR research by outfitting scientists with a full suite of tools.
    So...


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    LYMPH NODE STRUCTURAL CELLS REIN IN HUMAN IMMUNE RESPONSES

    Sep 05, 2018

    Until now, the study of the immune system has focused almost exclusively on white blood cells, and T cells in particular, as the body's major infection fighters. However, new research published September 4th in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Dr. Anne Fletcher and Dr. Konstantin Knoblich...

    PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE
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    FAMILY TREE OF BLOOD PRODUCTION REVEALS HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF STEM CELLS

    Sep 05, 2018

    Adult humans have many more blood-creating stem cells in their bone marrow than previously thought, ranging between 50,000 and 200,000 stem cells. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and Wellcome MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute developed a new approach for studying stem cells, based on ...

    WELLCOME TRUST SANGER INSTITUTE
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    BLUE-GREEN ALGAE PROMISES TO BOOST FOOD CROP YIELDS

    Sep 04, 2018

    Scientists at ANU have engineered tiny carbon-capturing engines from blue-green algae into plants, in a breakthrough that promises to help boost the yields of important food crops such as wheat, cowpeas, and cassava.
    Lead researcher Dr. Ben Long from ANU said the discovery was a major leap fo...

    AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY
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    MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF VIRAL DNA DETERMINE THE COURSE OF INFECTION

    Sep 04, 2018

    A new study reveals a previously unknown mechanism that governs whether viruses that infect bacteria will quickly kill their hosts or remain latent inside the cell. The discovery, reported in the journal eLife, also may apply to viruses that infect humans and other animals, the researcher said.
    UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN
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    THE NUMBER OF WEST NILE VIRUS INFECTIONS IN EUROPE IS HIGHER THAN NORMAL

    Sep 03, 2018

    A number of West Nile Fever cases in EU/EEA and EU neighboring countries by epidemiological week of notification*, 2014-2018, as of 30 August 2018. In 2018, as of 30 August 2018, 975 confirmed and probable autochthonous (indigenous) human West Nile Virus (WNV) infections were reported by European co...

    EUROPEAN CENTRE FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION
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    NEUTROPHIL NANOSPONGES SOAK UP PROTEINS THAT PROMOTE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Sep 03, 2018

    Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed neutrophil "nanosponges" that can safely absorb and neutralize a variety of proteins that play a role in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Injections of these nanosponges effectively treated severe rheumatoid arthrit...


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    GENETICS AND POLLUTION DRIVE SEVERITY OF ASTHMA SYMPTOMS

    Aug 31, 2018

    Asthma patients, with a specific genetic profile, exhibit more intense symptoms following exposure to traffic pollution, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health and collaborators. The study appeared online in Scientific Reports. The research team made up of scientists from the ...

    MEDICAL XPRESS
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    10X GENOMICS ACQUIRES EPIGENETIC STARTUP EPINOMICS IN FIRST M&A

    Aug 30, 2018

    10x Genomics has acquired its first startup since coming out of stealth just over three years ago. The company bought epigenetics startup Economics and plans to add its technology to its single-cell sequencing product set to launch by the end of the year, aimed at biotech researchers and pharma comp...