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    WHEN NEURONS ARE OUT OF SHAPE, ANTIDEPRESSANTS MAY NOT WORK

    Mar 22, 2019

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed medication for major depressive disorder (MDD), yet scientists still do not understand why the treatment does not work in nearly thirty percent of patients with MDD. Now, Salk Institute researchers have discovered diffe...


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    OPTICAL 'TWEEZERS' COMBINE WITH X-RAYS TO ENABLE ANALYSIS OF CRYSTALS IN LIQUIDS

    Mar 22, 2019

    Understanding how chemical reactions happen on tiny crystals in liquid solutions is central to a variety of fields, including materials synthesis and heterogeneous catalysis, but obtaining such an understanding requires that scientists observe reactions as they occur. By using coherent X-ray diffrac...


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    NEW COMPUTATIONAL TOOL COULD CHANGE HOW WE STUDY PATHOGENS

    Mar 22, 2019

    A sophisticated new analysis tool developed by Florida State University scientists may signal a new era in the study of population genetics. Their model, which incorporates advanced mathematical strategies, could help revolutionize the way researchers investigate the spread and distribution of dange...


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    ANTI-TB DRUGS CAN INCREASE RISK OF TB RE-INFECTION

    Mar 22, 2019

    Current treatments for tuberculosis (TB) are very effective in controlling TB infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). They don't, however, always prevent reinfection. Why this happens is one of the long-standing questions in TB research. So why are our bodies unable to generate per...


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    INJECTABLE BONE SCAFFOLDING MADE OF PLANT CELLULOSE

    Mar 20, 2019

    The majority of bone implants, cement, and grafts are hard objects that don’t always work well in filling the space they’re supposed to inhabit. Soft objects can gently expand and relocate their mass evenly over a volume, and they tend to be less dense so as to leave room for cells to ma...


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    RESEARCH PAVES WAY FOR NEW SOURCE FOR LEUKEMIA DRUG

    Mar 20, 2019

    Chemistry researchers at Oregon State University have patented a method for making anti-leukemia compounds that until now have only been available via an Asian tree that produces them. The synthesis of cephalotaxine and homoharringtonine (HHT) paves the way toward less-expensive, more readily availa...


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    COMPUTER SCIENTISTS CREATE PROGRAMMABLE SELF-ASSEMBLING DNA

    Mar 20, 2019

    Computer scientists at the University of California, Davis, Maynooth University in Ireland and the California Institute of Technology have created DNA molecules that can self-assemble into patterns essentially by running their own program. The work is published March 21 in the journal Nature. "...


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    CHROMATIN CHANGES RAPIDLY IN RESPONSE TO LOW OXYGEN, STUDY FINDS

    Mar 20, 2019

    A study by the University of Liverpool reveals new insights into how cells respond to oxygen deprivation. Published in the prestigious journal Science, the researchers found that chromatin, the complex of DNA and proteins where all genes reside, quickly changes in response to low oxygen. Oxygen is e...


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    PRESCRIBING HEALTHY FOOD IN MEDICARE/MEDICAID IS COST EFFECTIVE, COULD IMPROVE HEALTH

    Mar 19, 2019

    A team of researchers modeled the health and economic effects of healthy food prescriptions in Medicare and Medicaid. The study, published today in PLOS Medicine, finds that health insurance coverage to offset the cost of healthy food for Medicare and/or Medicaid participants would be highly cost-ef...


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    LINK FOUND BETWEEN TEMPERAMENT OF HIGH-RISK INFANTS AND OBESITY

    Mar 19, 2019

    Children born to mothers with gestational diabetes and who were easier to soothe as infants were at a higher risk to become obese children, according to a recent study published in JAMA Pediatrics by University at Buffalo researcher Myles S. Faith and collaborators. The study, "Association of I...


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    SQUISHING BLOOD STEM CELLS COULD FACILITATE HARVEST FOR TRANSPLANTS

    Mar 19, 2019

    Scientists at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta and Georgia Tech have found that modulating blood-forming stem cells' stiffness could possibly facilitate mobilization procedures used for stem cell-based transplants. Temporary squishiness could hel...


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    PRENATAL TESTOSTERONE LINKED TO LONG-TERM EFFECTS IN FEMALES WHO SHARE WOMB WITH MALE TWIN

    Mar 18, 2019

    Women who shared their mother's womb with a male twin are less likely to graduate from high school or college, have earned less by their early 30s, and have lower fertility and marriage rates when compared with twins who are both females, according to new Northwestern University research. In the...


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    PROTECTIVE ANTIBODIES ALSO FOUND IN PREMATURE BABIES

    Mar 18, 2019

    Even premature babies carry anti-viral antibodies transferred from the mother, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in a paper on maternal antibodies in newborns, published in the journal Nature Medicine. The results should change our approach to infection sensitivity in newborns, t...


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    MENINGITIS CHANGES IMMUNE CELL MAKEUP IN THE MOUSE BRAIN LINING

    Mar 18, 2019

    Meningitis, a group of serious diseases which infect the brain's lining, leaves its mark and can affect the body's ability to fight such infections in the future. According to a new study published in Nature Immunology, infections can have long-lasting effects on a population of meningeal im...


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    BIOSENSOR MAY PROVIDE BETTER CANCER DIAGNOSIS

    Mar 15, 2019

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have developed a new biological sensor that could help clinicians better diagnose cancer and epilepsy. Biological sensors monitor small molecules, ions, and protons and are vital as a medical diagnostic. Even the simplest signals, such as int...


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    A POSSIBLE CURE FOR RIVER BLINDNESS AND ELEPHANTIASIS

    Mar 15, 2019

    An international team of researchers has found what might be a cure for river blindness and elephantiasis. In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the group describes their search for a drug that could kill the parasitic worms behind the diseases, what they found, and...


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    LIGHT PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LINKED TO LOWER RISK OF HEART DISEASE IN OLDER WOMEN

    Mar 15, 2019

    Light physical activity such as gardening, strolling through a park, and folding clothes might be enough to significantly lower the risk of cardiovascular disease among women 63 and older, a new study has found. This kind of activity, researchers said, appears to reduce the risk of cardiovascular di...


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    PRECISION MEDICINE FOR PEDIATRIC CANCER CONSIDERING THE IMPLICATIONS FOR DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    Mar 15, 2019

    Research performed over the last several decades has led to an increased understanding of the genetics of cancer. The clinical application of this knowledge for pediatric cancer has lagged behind studies performed for adults. In a perspectives article published in the prestigious journal Science, Dr...


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    MINOR GENETIC CHANGE CREATES UNATTRACTIVE FEMALE MOTHS

    Mar 14, 2019

    Sex pheromones are chemical compounds released by an organism to attract potential mates. For months, in particular, these sex pheromones are very important for mate recognition, as they rely completely on scent signal rather than visual signals in mate attraction. However, there is still little kno...


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    BACTERIA 'TRAP' COULD HELP SLOW DOWN ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE

    Mar 14, 2019

    Scientists have developed a new and faster test for identifying how single bacteria react to antibiotics, which could help in the fight against antimicrobial resistance. Knowing how drugs impact single bacteria can help clinicians target the right antibiotics more quickly, reducing the need for prol...


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    RESEARCHERS MAKE IMPORTANT CELL DIVISION DISCOVERY

    Mar 14, 2019

    Researchers at the University of Dundee have provided important new insights into the regulation of cell division, which may ultimately lead to a better understanding of cancer progression. Cell division, also known as mitosis, is the process by which a parent cell divides into two daughter cells co...


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    USING AN ANTI-SMOKING DRUG TO CONTROL NEURONS

    Mar 14, 2019

    An anti-smoking drug now has a new job—as a chemical switch to turn select neurons on or off. The drug latches on to designer proteins, called ion channels, that control whether or not a neuron will send a message. By putting those proteins only in certain groups of neurons, scientists can tar...


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    POTENTIAL CYSTIC FIBROSIS TREATMENT USES 'MOLECULAR PROSTHETIC' FOR MISSING LUNG PROTEIN

    Mar 13, 2019

    An approved drug normally used to treat fungal infections could also do the job of a protein channel that is missing in the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis, operating as a prosthesis on the molecular scale, says new research from the University of Illinois and the University of Iowa. Cystic fib...


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    NEW CELL SUBTYPES CLASSIFIED IN MOUSE BRAIN

    Mar 13, 2019

    It's been estimated that the human brain contains roughly 100 billion neurons, together completing countless tasks through countless connections. So how do we make sense of the roles each of these neurons play? As part of the United States BRAIN Initiative, scientists from Cold Spring Harbor Lab...


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    RESEARCHERS CREATE NANO-BOT TO PROBE INSIDE HUMAN CELLS

    Mar 13, 2019

    University of Toronto Engineering researchers have built a set of magnetic 'tweezers' that can position a nano-scale bead inside a human cell in three dimensions with unprecedented precision. The nano-bot has already been used to study the properties of cancer cells and could point the way t...


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    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER SEROTONIN CAN REGULATE GENE EXPRESSION INSIDE NEURONS

    Mar 13, 2019

    The brain chemical serotonin, a neurotransmitter is long known for its role in passing signals between neurons in the brain, can also regulate expression of genes within neurons in an unexpected way, according to research conducted by neuroscientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai an...


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    SCIENTISTS DEMONSTRATE USE OF ULTRASOUND TO ALTER INFLAMMATORY AND METABOLIC RESPONSE

    Mar 12, 2019

    GE Research and Feinstein Institute for Medical Research bioelectronic medicine teams have demonstrated potentially breakthrough non-invasive methods to regulate dysfunction in the body's metabolic or inflammatory control systems using ultrasound. The findings were reported in this week's ed...


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    STUDY IDENTIFIES A 'SENSOR' THAT ACTIVATES CELL MIGRATION

    Mar 12, 2019

    The cytoskeleton is a structure that not only helps cells maintain their shape and internal organization but also enables them to perform functions like movement and migration to sites far from the place where they originated. Migration is an essential part of the spread of cancer cells to another o...


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    RESEARCHERS REPORT METRIC OF IMMUNE SYSTEM'S BIOLOGICAL CLOCK

    Mar 12, 2019

    A new study published in Nature Medicine from scientists at the Technion, Stanford, and CytoReason describes for the first time ever a way to quantify a person's "immune age." This game-changing capability provides a much more reliable predictor for the status of the immune system than...


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    SCIENTISTS FIND FIRST EVIDENCE FOR NECESSARY ROLE OF THE HUMAN HIPPOCAMPUS IN PLANNING

    Mar 12, 2019

    A team of scientists reports finding the first evidence that the human hippocampus is necessary for future planning. Its findings, published in the journal Neuron, link its long-established role in memory with our ability to use our knowledge to map out the future effects of our actions. The results...


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    GENES THAT EVOLVE FROM SCRATCH EXPAND PROTEIN DIVERSITY

    Mar 11, 2019

    One of the most important questions in biology is how rapidly new proteins evolve in organisms. Proteins are the building blocks that carry out the basic functions of life. As the genes that produce them change, the proteins change as well, introducing new functionality or traits that can eventually...


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    IBM USES MACHINE LEARNING TO DETECT EARLY ALZHEIMER’S IN BLOOD SAMPLES

    Mar 11, 2019

    Long before memory loss occurs in patients with Alzheimer’s, the protein amyloid-beta—which has been implicated in the formation of brain tangles that characterize the disease—starts building up in the spinal fluid. Problem is, detecting the protein there requires an invasive proce...


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    RESEARCHERS IDENTIFY ROLE GENDER-BIASED PROTEIN MAY PLAY IN AUTISM

    Mar 11, 2019

    Researchers at the University of New Hampshire are one step closer to helping answer the question of why autism is four times more common in boys than in girls after identifying and characterizing the connection of certain proteins in the brain to autism spectrum disorders (ASD). "Our study is ...


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    AXOVANT TRUMPETS NEW CLINICAL DATA AFTER GENE THERAPY PIVOT

    Mar 11, 2019

    Axovant has a pair of clinical readouts from its switch into gene therapy after failed endeavors in Alzheimer’s disease and the initial data look encouraging. The two studies, in Parkinson’s disease and neurodegenerative genetic disorder GM2 gangliosidosis or Tay-Sachs disease, involve a...


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    IMPROVEMENTS IN STRATIFYING COLORECTAL CANCER PATIENTS FOR PROGNOSIS

    Mar 08, 2019

    A method that integrates tumor buds, lymphocytic infiltration and their spatial relationship could better stratify patients with stage 2 colorectal cancer (CRC) at high risk for disease-specific death compared with traditional methods of clinical staging, according to results published in Cancer Imm...


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    VITAMIN D MAY PROTECT AGAINST POLLUTION-ASSOCIATED ASTHMA SYMPTOMS IN OBESE CHILDREN

    Mar 08, 2019

    A new study finds vitamin D may be protective among asthmatic obese children living in urban environments with high indoor air pollution. The study out of John Hopkins University School of Medicine, funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Insti...


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    EFFECTIVE MEDICAL TREATMENT OF GESTATIONAL DIABETES COULD REDUCE LONG-TERM COMPLICATIONS FOR THE CHILD

    Mar 08, 2019

    Researchers at Cardiff University have found that women taking metformin and/or insulin during gestational diabetes could reduce the risk of long-term complications for their child. The team discovered that the placentas of women treated with the drugs didn't exhibit DNA alterations associated w...


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    INTRAVENOUS ANTIBIOTICS TREATMENT FOR CHILDREN AT HOME AS EFFECTIVE AS HOSPITAL TREATMENT, STUDY FINDS

    Mar 08, 2019

    A Melbourne study has found intravenously administering antibiotics to children at home is as effective and safe as hospital treatment and better for their quality of life when treating a bacterial skin infection. The research, 'Efficacy and safety of intravenous ceftriaxone at home versus intra...


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    SARANAS’ TRANSCATHETER INTERNAL BLEEDING DETECTOR SCORES FDA DE NOVO CLEARANCE

    Mar 08, 2019

    Saranas has received a de novo clearance from the FDA for its Early Bird system, used to detect internal bleeding in real time during endovascular procedures. Invented at the Texas Heart Institute, the device includes a sensor-laden vascular access sheath that measures changes in electrical resistan...


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    VITAMIN B3 ANALOGUE BOOSTS PRODUCTION OF BLOOD CELLS

    Mar 07, 2019

    Stem cell-based therapies are becoming increasingly common, especially in the treatment of blood cancers like lymphoma and leukemia. In these cases, the patient's cancerous blood stem cells are removed and replaced with new, healthy ones. However, up to a quarter of cases end in death because re...


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    MAJOR MUTATION PATTERN IN CANCER OCCURS IN BURSTS

    Mar 07, 2019

    Researchers have created a huge resource for investigating the biological mechanisms that cause cancer. The scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators identified which patterns of DNA damage mutational fingerprints that represent the origins of cancer were present in over ...


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    HOW THE MICROBIOTA CONTROLS NEUTROPHIL ACTIVITY

    Mar 07, 2019

    A host protein called Serum Amyloid A (Saa) is a major factor mediating the effects of the microbiota on the function of immune cells called neutrophils, according to a study published March 7 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by John Rawls of Duke University School of Medicine, and colleagu...


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    LARGEST-EVER STUDY IDENTIFIES GENE REGIONS ASSOCIATED WITH SLEEP DURATION

    Mar 07, 2019

    A study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the University of Exeter Medical School has identified 76 new gene regions associated with sleep duration. The study by a team that recently reported finding gene sites associated with insomnia risk and chronotype - the tende...


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    'UNDRUGGABLE' PARKINSON'S MOLECULE SPILLS ITS SECRETS

    Mar 07, 2019

    UC San Francisco researchers have for the first time developed a strategy for targeting a key molecule implicated in Parkinson's disease, opening up a potential new treatment strategy for the currently incurable movement disorder. "This molecule is widely regarded as one of the top therapeu...


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    SCIENTISTS IDENTIFY GENETIC FACTORS THAT MAY CAUSE SOME PEOPLE TO BECOME OBESE

    Mar 06, 2019

    Obesity is a major public health problem in the United States and around the world, with an estimated 650 million people suffering from the condition. One of the biggest challenges of this ever-worsening condition is figuring out why people become obese in the first place, and why some people are mo...


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    MOLECULAR CONNECTION BETWEEN NUTRIENT AVAILABILITY AND EMBRYONIC GROWTH IDENTIFIED

    Mar 06, 2019

    The union of an ovule and a spermatozoon initiates a complex cell division process that will ultimately yield a new living being. In fact, all the body's cells come from embryonic stem cells that must divide in a controlled and exact fashion to give rise to proper organ and tissue formation in t...


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    MOLECULAR PUZZLE REVEALS UNKNOWN STAGES OF FETAL DEVELOPMENT

    Mar 06, 2019

    By applying gene analysis to individual cells from early mouse embryos, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered previously unknown cellular stages of fetal development from fertilized egg to living being. The study is published in the scientific journal Cell Reports. All over ...


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    SCIENTISTS IDENTIFY GENE PARTNERSHIPS THAT PROMOTE SPINAL CORD REGENERATION

    Mar 06, 2019

    Researchers are one step closer to solving the mystery of why some vertebrates can regenerate their spinal cords while others, including humans, create scar tissue after spinal cord injury, leading to lifelong damage. Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have identified gene "pa...


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    ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUG IS THE KEY TO BOOSTING CARDIAC REPROGRAMMING

    Mar 06, 2019

    Once damaged, the human heart does a poor job of repairing itself, and is thus a key priority for treating heart failure. One way of restoring cardiac function is to reprogram non-cardiac body cells such as fibroblasts into heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) using a collection of cardiac transcript...


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    BACTERIA-KILLING GLASS OFFERS HOPE IN FIGHT AGAINST HOSPITAL INFECTIONS

    Mar 05, 2019

    Scientists at Aston University have discovered a technique similar to medieval stained glass-making that can completely eradicate the deadliest hospital infections within hours. Using a so-called bioactive phosphate glass containing small amounts of the metallic element cobalt, the researchers were ...


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    SECOND HIV REMISSION PATIENT REKINDLES CURE HOPE

    Mar 05, 2019

    For just the second time ever an HIV patient is in sustained remission from the virus in what was hailed by experts Tuesday as proof that the AIDS-causing condition could one day be curable. Ten years almost to the day since the first confirmed case of an HIV-infected person being rid of the deadly ...


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    HARNESSING SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY TO CO-PRODUCE HIGH-VALUE TERPENOID BIOMATERIALS AND BIOFUEL IN PLANTS

    Mar 05, 2019

    Michigan State University scientists have developed synthetic biology tools to co-produce high-value compounds in plants. The study is published today in the journal Nature Communications. Terpenoids from the largest class of natural products in plants and have been used by humans for thousands of y...


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    BREAST CANCER CELLS RELY ON PYRUVATE TO EXPAND IN NEW TISSUES

    Mar 05, 2019

    Most patients who die of breast cancer die of metastasis, the process by which cancer cells spread to other organs of the body. Cancer cells alter their metabolism to grow and expand across other organs. A new study by Prof. Sarah-Maria Fendt from the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology and her ...


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    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE DIGITALLY STAINS TISSUE SAMPLES USED IN PATHOLOGY, SAVING LABOR, TIME AND COST

    Mar 05, 2019

    Histopathology is one of the main methods used for diagnosis of disease. Following a medical screening process, a patient can undergo a biopsy, in which a piece of tissue is removed for further inspection and diagnostic analysis. This tissue specimen is then sliced into thin sections that are on the...


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    GLOBAL MAPS ENABLING TARGETED INTERVENTIONS TO REDUCE BURDEN OF MOSQUITO-BORNE DISEASE

    Mar 04, 2019

    Now, with an unprecedented level of accuracy, an international team of researchers, led by Dr. Moritz Kramer at the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology, have used statistical mapping techniques to predict where the species will spread over an immediate, medium and long-term time-scale. ...


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    WHEN IT COMES TO HEARING WORDS, IT'S A DIVISION OF LABOR BETWEEN OUR BRAIN'S TWO HEMISPHERES

    Mar 04, 2019

    Scientists have uncovered a new "division of labor" between our brain's two hemispheres in how we comprehend the words and other sounds we hear—a finding that offers new insights into the processing of speech and points to ways to address auditory disorders. "Our findings po...


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    POTENTIAL TREATMENT STRATEGY UNCOVERED FOR PANCREATIC CANCER

    Mar 04, 2019

    Scientists at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center discovered a technique to make pancreatic cancer cells reliant on one energy source and then starve them of it—a finding that has led to clinical studies of a novel treatment strategy for one of the deadliest...


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    SWIMMING MICROBES STEER THEMSELVES INTO MATHEMATICAL ORDER

    Mar 04, 2019

    Freeing thousands of microorganisms to swim in random directions in an infinite pool of liquid may not sound like a recipe for order, but eventually, the swarm will go with its own flow. Theoretical modeling led by the University of Wisconsin–Madison applied mathematician Saverio Spagnolie sho...


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    CHANDELIER NEURON REQUIRES 'VELCRO-LIKE' MOLECULE TO FORM CONNECTIONS

    Mar 04, 2019

    As a brain grows, the neurons within it establish themselves, forming lasting connections with their neighbors. They're creating the vast cell networks that ensure a mind and body run smoothly. Now, researchers have determined how a crucial kind of neuron called a chandelier cell (ChC) forms con...


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    SURVIVOR ANTIBODY CLEARS PATH FOR NEW EBOLA VACCINE

    Mar 04, 2019

    An antibody taken from an Ebola survivor has been found to target all three human strains of the virus and could eventually lead to an all-purpose vaccine against the killer disease, scientists said Monday. Ebola, which can be lethal in 90 percent of cases if untreated, killed more than 11,000 peopl...


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    TWO GENES EXPLAIN VARIATION IN COLOR AND BEHAVIOR IN THE WALL LIZARD

    Mar 01, 2019

    How are reptiles capable of generating such a diversity of bright colors? And how is it possible that within a single population of the same species, different individuals exhibit strikingly different coloration patterns? In a new paper published in the journal PNAS an international team of scientis...


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    CELLS USE SUGARS TO COMMUNICATE AT THE MOLECULAR LEVEL

    Mar 01, 2019

    The human body is made up of 30 to 40 million cells, a large and complex network of blood cells, neurons, and specialized cells that make up organs and tissues. Until now, figuring out which mechanisms control communication between them has proven a significant challenge for the field of cell biolog...


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    HIGH-FAT DIET CAUSES THICKENING OF ARTERIES DOWN TO THE CELLULAR LEVEL

    Mar 01, 2019

    Atherosclerosis is a tough problem—arteries get thicker and stiffer, which can lead to heart disease and stroke, but it is not known precisely how cholesterol causes this thickening. Cholesterol is a tiny fat molecule that circulates in our bloodstream with the help of lipoproteins. High level...


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    NEW X-RAY MEASUREMENT APPROACH COULD IMPROVE CT SCANNERS

    Mar 01, 2019

    A new measurement approach proposed by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) could lead to a better way to calibrate computed tomography (CT) scanners, potentially streamlining patient treatment by improving communication among doctors. The approach, detailed in a r...


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    TOWARD A BLOOD TEST FOR EARLY-STAGE LIVER DISEASE

    Mar 01, 2019

    One in four people in Western and Asian societies develop a build-up of fat in the liver as a result of an unhealthy diet. This disease – referred to as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) – causes no symptoms initially but can develop into end-stage liver cirrhosis with limited tr...


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    BACTERIA IN FROG SKIN MAY HELP FIGHT FUNGAL INFECTIONS IN HUMANS

    Mar 01, 2019

    In the past few decades, a lethal disease has decimated populations of frogs and other amphibians worldwide, even driving some species to extinction. Yet other amphibians resisted the epidemic. Based on previous research, scientists at the INDICASAT AIP, Smithsonian and collaborating institutions kn...


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    TOOL REVEALS MOLECULAR CAUSES OF DISEASE, INCLUDING INFANT CANCER

    Mar 01, 2019

    Princeton University researchers are gaining new insights into the causes and characteristics of diseases by harnessing machine learning to analyze molecular patterns across hundreds of diseases simultaneously. Demonstrating a new tool now available to researchers worldwide, the team of computer sci...


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    TOOL REVEALS MOLECULAR CAUSES OF DISEASE, INCLUDING INFANT CANCER

    Mar 01, 2019

    Princeton University researchers are gaining new insights into the causes and characteristics of diseases by harnessing machine learning to analyze molecular patterns across hundreds of diseases simultaneously. Demonstrating a new tool now available to researchers worldwide, the team of computer sci...


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    RESEARCHERS IDENTIFY HOW METABOLITES TARGET BRAIN-HOMING IMMUNE CELLS TO TREAT MS

    Feb 28, 2019

    Understanding and mitigating the role of epigenetics (environmental influences that trigger changes in gene expression) in disease development is a major goal of researchers. Now, a newly published paper featured on the March cover of the journal Brain adds significantly to this work by detailing ho...


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    HOW FUNGI INFLUENCE GLOBAL PLANT COLONISATION

    Feb 28, 2019

    The symbiosis of plants and fungi has a great influence on the worldwide spread of plant species. In some cases, it even acts as a filter. This has been discovered by an international team of researchers with participation from the University of Göttingen. The results appeared in the journal Na...


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    HOW PROSTATE CANCER BECOMES TREATMENT RESISTANT

    Feb 28, 2019

    The development of effective anti-androgen therapies for prostate cancer is a major scientific advance. However, some men who receive these targeted treatments are more likely to develop a deadly treatment-resistant prostate cancer subtype called neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC). No effective t...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27572757

    BIOFUNCTIONALIZED CERAMICS FOR CRANIAL BONE DEFECT REPAIR – IN VIVO STUDY

    Feb 28, 2019

    Advances in materials science and production technology have enabled bone tissue engineering (BTE) strategies that generate complex scaffolds with controlled architecture for bone repair. The novel biomaterials can be further functionalized with bioactive molecules for biocompatibility by enhancing ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27582758

    GENE ACTIVITY IN DEFENDERS DEPENDS ON INVADING SLAVEMAKING ANTS

    Feb 28, 2019

    Temnothorax americanus is a slavemaking ant found in northeastern America. These tiny social insects neither rear their offspring nor search for food themselves. Instead, they raid nests of another ant species, Temnothorax longispinosus, kidnap their larvae and pupae to bring these back to their own...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27592759

    AN ATLAS OF AN AGGRESSIVE LEUKEMIA

    Feb 28, 2019

    A team of researchers led by Bradley Bernstein at the Ludwig Center at Harvard has used single-cell technologies and machine learning to create a detailed "atlas of cell states" for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that could help improve treatment of aggressive cancer. AML is characterized by...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27602760

    HAPPY IN MARRIAGE? GENETICS MAY PLAY A ROLE

    Feb 28, 2019

    People fall in love for many reasons—similar interests, physical attraction, and shared values among them. But if they marry and stay together, their long-term happiness may depend on their individual genes or those of their spouse, says a new study led by Yale School of Public Health research...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27612761

    'MUTATION HOTSPOT' ALLOWS COMMON FUNGUS TO ADAPT TO DIFFERENT HOST ENVIRONMENTS

    Feb 28, 2019

    The fungus Candida albicans is found in the gastrointestinal tract of about half of healthy adults with little if any effect, yet it also causes an oft-fatal blood infection among patients with compromised immune systems, including those with HIV/AIDS. New research from Brown University helps show h...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27622762

    RESEARCHERS 'BAIT' PATHOLOGICAL PROTEINS UNDERLYING MANY NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS

    Feb 27, 2019

    A single misbehaving protein—called TDP-43—is behind 97 percent of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases and 45 percent of frontotemporal dementia diagnoses. It also is found in 80 percent of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and 60 percent of Alzheimer's disease cases. Now, Unive...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27422742

    TURNING STEM CELLS INTO BONE WITH NANOCLAY-REINFORCED HYDROGEL

    Feb 27, 2019

    Assistant Professor Alireza Dolatshahi-Pirouz and colleagues have developed a hydrogel that combines synthetic materials with living cells and can turn stem cells into bone without adding external growth or differentiation factors. More than 50 percent of women and 20 percent of men over the age of ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27432743

    MOTHER'S BEHAVIORAL CORRECTIONS TUNE INFANT'S BRAIN TO ANGRY TONE

    Feb 27, 2019

    The same brain network that adults use when they hear angry vocalizations is at work in infants as young as six months old, an effect that is strongest in infants whose mothers spend the most time controlling their behavior, according to a new study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Chen Zhao o...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27442744

    MONITORING THE SYNTHESIS OF THE BACTERIAL CELL WALL IN REAL TIME

    Feb 27, 2019

    A significant breakthrough has just been made in the world of biochemistry: a team of international researchers has developed a revolutionary method to monitor in real time an essential element of bacterial growth. Since the new technique allows the cell wall of bacteria to be fluorescently "st...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27452745

    YEAST PRODUCE LOW-COST, HIGH-QUALITY CANNABINOIDS

    Feb 27, 2019

    University of California, Berkeley, synthetic biologists have engineered brewer's yeast to produce marijuana's main ingredients mind-altering THC and non-psychoactive CBD as well as novel cannabinoids not found in the plant itself. Feeding only on sugar, the yeast is an easy and cheap way to...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27462746

    IDENTIFICATION OF GENES RESPONSIBLE FOR SOUR TASTE IN CITRUS FRUIT MAY ENABLE THE CREATION OF NEW, SWEETER VARIETIES

    Feb 27, 2019

    A team of researchers, including two from the University of California, Riverside, has identified the genes responsible for the hallmark sour taste of many citrus fruits. Published Tuesday, Feb. 25 in Nature Communications, the research could help plant breeders develop new, sweeter varieties. Moder...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27472747

    MUSCLE GENE MUTATIONS IMPLICATED IN HUMAN NASAL/SINUS CANCER

    Feb 27, 2019

    By sequencing the entire genomes of tumor cells from six people with a rare cancer of the nose and sinus cavity, Johns Hopkins researchers report they unexpectedly found the same genetic change¾one in a gene involved in muscle formation¾in five of the tumors. "In terms of research...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27482748

    RESEARCHERS FIND THE IMMUNE SYSTEM'S UNKNOWN MESSENGER

    Feb 26, 2019

    Researchers can now explain how a cell that is being attacked by bacteria or viruses specifically manages to 'sound the alarm' among its neighboring cells so they can react with a quick response. "We've succeeded in finding and describing a messenger which both quickly and effective...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27282728

    NEW METHOD USES AI TO SCREEN FOR FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDER

    Feb 26, 2019

    Scientists at the University of Southern California (USC), Queen's University (Ontario) and Duke University have developed a new tool that can screen children for fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) quickly and affordable, making it accessible to more children in remote locations worldwide. T...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27292729

    OXYGEN-TRACKING METHOD COULD IMPROVE DIABETES TREATMENT

    Feb 26, 2019

    Transplanting pancreatic islet cells into patients with diabetes is a promising alternative to the daily insulin injections that many of these patients now require. These cells could act as a bioartificial pancreas, monitoring blood glucose levels and secreting insulin when needed. For this kind of ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27302730

    HOW OUR TISSUES MANAGE MECHANICAL STRESS

    Feb 26, 2019

    When running, breathing and moving, the body is continuously deforming. How do the tissues in the body deal with all these mechanical stresses? Publishing today in Nature Physics, researchers from Wageningen University & Research (WUR) and AMOLF institute show how the two principal components of...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27312731

    BETTER TOGETHER: MITOCHONDRIAL FUSION SUPPORTS CELL DIVISION

    Feb 26, 2019

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell. And for mitochondria, much like for double-header engines stacked together in a steam train, working in multiples has its benefits. New research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that when cells divide rapidly, their mitochondria are fused to...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27322732

    INHIBITING CANCER-CAUSING PROTEIN COULD PREVENT SCLERODERMA FIBROSIS

    Feb 26, 2019

    A protein known to play a role in cancer may also be increasing fibrosis in scleroderma patients. Scleroderma, a rare, chronic autoimmune disease, is marked by hardening of the skin and internal organs. Symptoms often include pain, stiffness, fatigue and breathing difficulties. "The disease cre...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27332733

    RESEARCHERS FIND POND BACTERIA GROWS FASTER DURING THE DAY, SUGGEST A GENETIC EXPLANATION

    Feb 26, 2019

    Some of the bacteria that live in ponds, lakes and other freshwater environments grow faster during the day, even though they don't take in sunlight as an energy source, according to researchers at the University of Delaware. Special genes that absorb light could possibly explain this increased ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27342734

    COMMON VIRUS IS 'LESS PRONE TO MUTATION' GIVING HOPE FOR VACCINE DEVELOPMENT

    Feb 25, 2019

    One of the commonest causes of congenital disability, the Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV), is less prone to mutation than previously thought, a finding which could help develop a successful vaccine, UCL researchers have found. HCMV, a DNA virus, and type of herpes virus is one of the world's most c...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27142714

    RESEARCH TEAM ERADICATES HEPATITIS C IN PATIENTS AFTER HEART TRANSPLANTS FROM INFECTED DONORS

    Feb 25, 2019

    Nine patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving heart transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease, according to a study published in the American Journal of Transplantation. The results highlight the potential for expanding t...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27152715

    SCIENTISTS UNCOVER GENETIC ROADMAP OF CULTIVATED STRAWBERRY

    Feb 25, 2019

    Consumers want strawberries to be red, sweet, ripe and juicy like those fresh picked from a garden. Suppliers want them to be easy to handle and ship, without getting squished. Commercial strawberry growers need their crops to be high-yielding and disease-resistant. An international team of scientis...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27162716

    NEW CLUES ABOUT WHY NON-SMOKERS, AS WELL AS SMOKERS, DEVELOP CHRONIC LUNG DISEASE REVEALED

    Feb 25, 2019

    The new study, published in Nature Genetics, shows that genetic differences help explain why some people who have never smoked develop the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and why some smokers are at higher risk of getting the disease than other smokers. During the two-year study, resea...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27172717

    LIGHT-DRIVEN SIGNALING OF BACTERIA MAY PROVIDE CLUES TO DEFEAT DANGEROUS INFECTIONS

    Feb 25, 2019

    From the complex to the simple, all life forms have mechanisms for translating environmental cues into cellular behavior that helps them survive. This universal activity may hold the key to understanding how common bacteria transform into virulent, deadly infections in humans, but the multifaceted p...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27182718

    SCIENTISTS LAY FOUNDATION FOR SINGLE-CELL LEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF DNA REPLICATION

    Feb 25, 2019

    A research team has established a novel method to scrutinize DNA replication in individual cells. This method allowed them to obtain a detailed genome-wide view of replicated and unreplicated sequence distribution in each cell. They also succeeded in discriminating paternally and maternally derived ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27192719

    ARTIFICIAL LUNG CANCER TISSUE COULD HELP FIND NEW DRUG TREATMENTS

    Feb 25, 2019

    A 3-D hydrogel created by researchers in U of T Engineering Professor Molly Shoichet's lab is helping University of Ottawa researchers to quickly screen hundreds of potential drugs for their ability to fight highly invasive cancers. Cell invasion is a critical hallmark of metastatic cancers, suc...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27202720

    OUTFITTING T CELL RECEPTORS TO COMBAT A WIDESPREAD AND SOMETIMES DEADLY VIRUS

    Feb 22, 2019

    Researchers have engineered "antibody-like" T cell receptors that can specifically stick to cells infected with cytomegalovirus, or CMV, a virus that causes lifelong infection in more than half of all adults by age 40. These receptors represent a new potential treatment option, could aid t...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27002700

    NEW MRI SENSOR CAN IMAGE ACTIVITY DEEP WITHIN THE BRAIN

    Feb 22, 2019

    Calcium is a critical signaling molecule for most cells, and it is especially important in neurons. Imaging calcium in brain cells can reveal how neurons communicate with each other; however, current imaging techniques can only penetrate a few millimeters into the brain. MIT researchers have now dev...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27012701

    OLDER BIOLOGIC AGE LINKED TO ELEVATED BREAST CANCER RISK

    Feb 22, 2019

    Biologic age, a DNA-based estimate of a person's age, is associated with future development of breast cancer, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health. Biologic age was determined by measuring DNA methylation, a chemical modification to DNA that is part of the normal aging pr...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27022702

    FAILURE TO TAKE STATINS LEADS TO HIGHER MORTALITY RATES

    Feb 22, 2019

    Patients who took statins less than 70 percent of the time had a 20 percent increase in mortality compared with those taking them at least 90 percent of the time, a Stanford study found. A lot of patients with arteries clogged by cholesterol aren't taking their statins, a new study by researcher...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27032703

    TRICLOSAN ADDED TO CONSUMER PRODUCTS IMPAIRS RESPONSE TO ANTIBIOTIC TREATMENT

    Feb 22, 2019

    Grocery store aisles are stocked with products that promise to kill bacteria. People snap up those items to protect themselves from the germs that make them sick. However, new research from Washington University in St. Louis finds that a chemical that is supposed to kill bacteria is actually making ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27042704

    RESEARCHERS CREATE ORGANOID OF A BRAIN REGION TO STUDY COGNITIVE DISORDERS

    Feb 22, 2019

    In a lab dish, Yale researchers modeled two brain structures and their interactions to shed light on the origins of neuropsychiatric diseases. In-Hyun Park, associate professor of genetics, and his team created an organoid of the thalamus, a major hub that integrates sensory information and relays i...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27052705

    VANDERBILT COLLABORATION YIELDS PROMISING COMPOUND TO TREAT ARRHYTHMIA

    Feb 22, 2019

    A collaboration between Vanderbilt University professors of chemistry and medicine yielded a promising compound to treat arrhythmia from an unlikely place: the fungal natural product verticilide. Jeffrey Johnston, Stevenson Professor of Chemistry, said the natural product isn't active except in ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=27062706

    INTUITIVE SURGICAL RELEASES ION ROBOTIC LUNG BIOPSY SYSTEM

    Feb 21, 2019

    Intuitive Surgical, the firm that makes the popular da Vinci surgical robotic systems, won FDA clearance and is releasing a robotic lung biopsy system called Ion in the United States. The catheter-based device allows precise penetration and sampling of tissues deep within the lungs. The catheter is ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26882688

    BAT INFLUENZA VIRUSES COULD INFECT HUMANS

    Feb 21, 2019

    Bats don't only carry the deadly Ebola virus but are also a reservoir for a new type of influenza virus. These newly discovered flu viruses could potentially also attack the cells of humans and livestock, researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown. Seasonal outbreaks of the flu are c...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26892689

    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER HOW BLOOD VESSELS PROTECT THE BRAIN DURING INFLAMMATION

    Feb 21, 2019

    Researchers from the University of British Columbia have discovered how blood vessels protect the brain during inflammation a finding that could lead to the development of new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases such as stroke, epilepsy, and multiple sclerosis. In a study published today in th...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26902690

    BACTERIA CAN SURVIVE STARVATION IN ZOMBIE MODE

    Feb 21, 2019

    Bacteria that are exposed to a hostile environment, for example with antibiotics or very few nutrients, can sometimes survive by 'going to sleep." Biologists from the University of Amsterdam (UvA) have discovered an unknown, alternative survival strategy: a kind of zombie mode, in which the...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26912691

    T-CELL SPECIFICITY FOUND TO PLAY A ROLE IN ATTACKS ON MYELIN VERSUS Β-SYNUCLEIN IN MS

    Feb 21, 2019

    A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in Germany has found that T-cell specificity plays a major role in immune system attacks on myelin versus β-synuclein in people with multiple sclerosis. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their study of...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26922692

    WHAT PLANT PROTEINS CAN TELL US ABOUT ALZHEIMER'S

    Feb 20, 2019

    Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia are a growing burden on society and a leading cause of death among the elderly. There is no cure. Salt from rising water tables and seawater intrusions are increasingly affecting crop production around the world. It's estimated that up to 50 pe...

    UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26782678

    NEW INSIGHT ON POTENT HIV ANTIBODY COULD IMPROVE VACCINE DESIGN

    Feb 20, 2019

    In the quest to develop an effective HIV vaccine, researchers have focused attention on identifying and targeting the region of the virus's outer envelope where a lineage of antibodies are able to dock and neutralize the virus. But true to form with HIV, these broadly neutralizing antibodies, or...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26792679

    RESEARCHERS DEFINE CELLS USED IN BONE REPAIR

    Feb 20, 2019

    Research led by Johns Hopkins investigators has uncovered the roles of two types of cells found in the vessel walls of fat tissue and described how these cells may help speed bone repair. The study found that one of these perivascular stem cell types, pericytes, induces growth of new blood vessels, ...

    JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26802680

    VIGOROUS EXERCISE, FASTING, HORMONES IMPROVE ELIMINATION OF TOXIC, MISFOLDED, UNNECESSARY PROTEINS IN MOUSE, HUMAN CELLS

    Feb 20, 2019

    The body's ability to adapt to changing conditions and shifting physiologic demands is essential to survival. To do so, each cell must be able to dispose of damaged or unnecessary proteins a quality-control mechanism critical for cellular performance and for the health of the entire organism. No...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26812681

    VIRUSES THAT LINGER IN THE GUT COULD TRIGGER TYPE 1 DIABETES

    Feb 20, 2019

    Researchers at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, provide new evidence supporting an association between elevated levels of enteroviruses in the intestinal tracts of children...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26822682

    USING CRYSTALS TO UNPACK HOW VIRUSES WORK

    Feb 19, 2019

    Researchers at Cardiff University have used X-ray crystallography and computer simulation to get a closer look at how viruses bind cells and cause infection. The new insight could help in the development of drugs and therapies for infections and further advance the exploitation of viruses for medica...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26692669

    NOVEL GENE THERAPY APPROACH CREATES NEW ROUTE TO TACKLE RARE, INHERITED DISEASES

    Feb 19, 2019

    Nonsense mutations are single-letter errors in the genetic code that prematurely halt the production of critical proteins. These unfinished proteins are unable to function normally, and nonsense mutations cause 10-15 percent of all inherited genetic diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, s...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26702670

    STUDY FINDS LOW STATIN USE AMONG SOME HIGH-RISK KIDNEY DISEASE PATIENTS

    Feb 19, 2019

    Clinical trials have shown that cholesterol-lowering statin drugs can significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in kidney disease patients who are not on dialysis. But a new study has found that statins are used by only 21.8 percent of such patients who do not already have cardiovascul...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26712671

    RESEARCHERS DEVELOP NEW ONE-TWO PUNCH AGAINST MELANOMA IN MOUSE MODEL

    Feb 19, 2019

    Researchers at the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy at Johns Hopkins and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine report two new forms of an older anti-cancer agent they developed appear to enhance the immune system's ability to fight melanoma in mice. The agents, dubbe...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26722672

    SCIENTISTS REVEAL HOW 3-D ARRANGEMENT OF DNA HELPS PERPETUATE THE SPECIES

    Feb 18, 2019

    From fathers to children, the delivery of hereditary information requires the careful packing of DNA in sperm. But just how nature packages this DNA to prepare offspring isn't clear. Using new technology to reveal the 3-D organization of DNA in maturing male reproductive cells, scientists reveal...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26612661

    HOW OUR PLANTS HAVE TURNED INTO THIEVES TO SURVIVE

    Feb 18, 2019

    Scientists have discovered that grasses are able to short cut evolution by taking genes from their neighbors. The findings suggest wild grasses are naturally genetically modifying themselves to gain a competitive advantage. Understanding how this is happening may also help scientists reduce the risk...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26622662

    GREAT WHITE SHARK GENOME DECODED

    Feb 18, 2019

    The great white shark is one of the most recognized marine creatures on Earth, generating widespread public fascination and media attention, including spawning one of the most successful movies in Hollywood history. This shark possesses notable characteristics, including its massive size (up to 20 f...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26632663

    STUDY SHOWS THAT GLIOBLASTOMA PATIENTS SURVIVE SIGNIFICANTLY LONGER WITH COMBINATION CHEMOTHERAPY

    Feb 18, 2019

    Cancer researchers at the University of Bonn have reported significant progress in the treatment of glioblastoma. About one-third of all patients suffer from a particular variant of this most common and aggressive brain tumor. Survival of these patients treated with the new combination therapy incre...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26642664

    BLOOD CLOT DISCOVERY COULD PAVE WAY FOR TREATMENT OF BLOOD DISEASES

    Feb 15, 2019

    Scientists have discovered new ways in which the body regulates blood clots, in a discovery which could one day lead to the development of better treatments that could help prevent and treat conditions including heart diseases, stroke, and vascular dementia. Led by the University of Exeter and funde...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26532653

    TCR2 IPO HITS MIDPOINT, SETTING STAGE FOR TRIALS OF CAR-T RIVALS

    Feb 15, 2019

    TCR2 Therapeutics has priced its IPO at the midpoint of the target range. The offering stands to net TCR2 $67 million, setting it up to move cell therapies designed to better CAR-Ts through early-phase development. Massachusetts-based TCR2 has reached the cusp of clinical development fueled by $125 ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26542654

    BIOLOGISTS IDENTIFY HONEYBEE 'CLEAN' GENES KNOWN FOR IMPROVING SURVIVAL

    Feb 15, 2019

    The key to breeding disease-resistant honeybees could lie in a group of genes known for controlling hygienic behavior that enables colonies to limit the spread of harmful mites and bacteria, according to genomics research conducted at York University. Some worker honeybees detect and remove sick and...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26552655

    PATIENTS' OWN CELLS COULD BE THE KEY TO TREATING CROHN'S DISEASE

    Feb 15, 2019

    A new technique using patients' own modified cells to treat Crohn's disease has been proven to be effective in experiments using human cells, with a clinical trial of the treatment expected to start in the next six months. Researchers at the NIHR Guy's and St Thomas' Biomedical Resea...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26562656

    TESTS SUGGEST SCIENTISTS ACHIEVED FIRST 'IN BODY' GENE EDITING

    Feb 07, 2019

    Scientists think they have achieved the first gene editing inside the body, altering DNA in adults to try to treat a disease, although it's too soon to know if this will help. Preliminary results suggest that two men with a rare disorder now have a corrective gene at very low levels, which may n...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26452645

    NEW TECHNIQUE PINPOINTS MILESTONES IN THE EVOLUTION OF BACTERIA

    Feb 07, 2019

    Bacteria have evolved all manner of adaptations to living in every habitat on Earth. But unlike plants and animals, which can be preserved as fossils, bacteria have left behind little physical evidence of their evolution, making it difficult for scientists to determine exactly when different groups ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26462646

    LAB DISCOVERS HOW THE IMMUNE SYSTEM 'THINKS'

    Feb 07, 2019

    New research from the laboratory of cancer scientist Dr. Tak Mak, renowned for cloning the human T-cell receptor, has demonstrated that immune cells make brain chemicals to fight off infections. The first proof-of-function findings, published online today in the journal Science, solve a puzzle scien...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26472647

    SIMPLE DRUG COMBINATION CREATES NEW NEURONS FROM NEIGHBORING CELLS

    Feb 07, 2019

    A simple drug cocktail that converts cells neighboring damaged neurons into functional new neurons could potentially be used to treat stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and brain injuries. A team of researchers at Penn State identified a set of four, or even three, molecules that could convert glial c...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26482648

    GLADSTONE INSTITUTES’ ROBERT MAHLEY LAUNCHES ALZHEIMER’S BIOTECH GABAERON

    Feb 06, 2019

    Robert Mahley, founder, and president of Gladstone Institutes, an internationally-recognized expert on heart disease, cholesterol metabolism and Alzheimer’s disease, is launching a biotech company to focus on Alzheimer’s disease. The company is called GABAeron. Gladstone Institutes is af...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26372637

    NEWLY DISCOVERED IMMUNE CELLS PLAY ROLE IN INFLAMMATORY BRAIN DISEASES

    Feb 06, 2019

    A team of researchers under the direction of the Medical Center—University of Freiburg has observed in an animal model that previously unknown types of immune cells are present in the inflamed brain in the course of multiple sclerosis (MS). The discovery was made through a new, high-resolution...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26382638

    NEW COMPUTER PROGRAM AIMS TO REDUCE DNA CONTAMINATION IN MICROBIAL SAMPLES

    Feb 06, 2019

    DNA sequencing of microbial samples can give researchers and medical professionals a wealth of information about microbiomes – the communities of microorganisms that inhabit our bodies and the environments all around us. Understanding the microbiome can aid our understanding of what ails us an...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26392639

    NEW ANTI-CRISPR PROTEINS DISCOVERED IN SOIL AND HUMAN GUT

    Feb 06, 2019

    Scientists from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability (DTU) have found four new anti-CRISPR proteins that are distributed across different environments. The new study published in Cell Host & Microbe suggests that some anti-CRISPR proteins are more widespread in nature than pr...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26402640

    A BETTER WAY TO MEASURE CELL SURVIVAL

    Feb 05, 2019

    Measuring the toxic effects of chemical compounds on different types of cells is critical for developing cancer drugs, which must be able to kill their target cells. Analyzing cell survival is also an important task in fields such as environmental regulation, to test industrial and agricultural chem...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26282628

    HIV-1 PROTEIN SUPPRESSES IMMUNE RESPONSE MORE BROADLY THAN THOUGHT

    Feb 05, 2019

    Scientists have revealed how a protein produced by HIV-1 plays a broader role in suppressing the immune system's response to infection than previously thought. Their findings could help inform more effective treatment strategies for HIV, including those aimed at activating the dormant virus in p...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26292629

    MOTHER'S AGE, RACE, WEIGHT AFFECT HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS IN PREGNANCY, STUDY FINDS

    Feb 05, 2019

    Hormone concentrations during early fetal development that may affect the child's development and increase the mother's risk for breast and ovarian cancer years later are significantly affected by maternal age, body mass index and race rather than lifestyle, according to a Rutgers study. The...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26302630

    WHAT DRIVES PATIENTS TO USE MEDICAL MARIJUANA: MOSTLY CHRONIC PAIN

    Feb 05, 2019

    Slowly but surely, the stigma surrounding marijuana use is losing its grip in the U.S. Since the 1990s, advocates have pushed for a re-evaluation of cannabis (the plant species name often used interchangeably with marijuana) as a viable treatment for a host of ailments. As of 2018, 33 states and the...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26312631

    MODERNA’S NOT THE ONLY ONE: A LOOK AT THE MRNA MARKET

    Feb 04, 2019

    Although Moderna gets the lion’s share of attention in the mRNA market, it’s not the only company working to break away with this potentially disruptive technology. Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a family of RNA molecules that transport genetic information from DNA to the ribosome, where it spe...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26192619

    THE WEB MEETS GENOMICS: A DNA SEARCH ENGINE FOR MICROBES

    Feb 04, 2019

    Researchers at EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) have combined their knowledge of bacterial genetics and web search algorithms to build a DNA search engine for microbial data. The search engine, described in a paper published in Nature Biotechnology, could enable researchers an...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=26202620

    MORE THAN 100 NEW GUT BACTERIA DISCOVERED IN HUMAN MICROBIOME

    Feb 04, 2019

    Scientists working on the gut microbiome have discovered and isolated more than 100 completely new species of bacteria from healthy people's intestines. The study from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hudson Institute of Medical Research, Australia, and EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute...


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    STRUCTURE OF VIRUS THAT INFECTS BACTERIA IN HOT SPRINGS IS REVEALED

    Feb 04, 2019

    Scientists have revealed the structure of a virus infecting bacteria that thrive in 160-degree hot springs in places like Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. The discovery could lead to better-targeted delivery of drugs into cells and new DNA sequencing technology, according to a study by Rutgers ...


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    MICROBES HITCHED TO INSECTS PROVIDE A RICH SOURCE OF NEW ANTIBIOTICS

    Feb 01, 2019

    Medicine was transformed in the 20th century by the discovery and development of antibiotics, the vast majority of which came from one source: soil bacteria. But we seem to have tapped out that supply. Resistance by disease-causing pathogens to existing antibiotics is increasing, endangering million...


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    STEM CELL GROWTH ACCELERATED BY TROPOELASTIN PROTEIN

    Feb 01, 2019

    Tropoelastin, the raw material used to create 'MeTro' elastic surgical glue developed with the University of Sydney, has been found to encourage stem cell growth—with the potential to ultimately help the body repair itself. Stem cells are vital for therapeutic treatments to repair and ...


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    BLOOD TEST FOR SPECIFIC METABOLITES COULD REVEAL BLOCKED ARTERIES

    Feb 01, 2019

    A Duke Health pilot project suggests that in the near future, a blood test could show whether arteries carrying blood to the heart are narrow or blocked, a risk factor for heart disease. According to the 40-person study published in the journal PLOS ONE, emergency patients who underwent a treadmill ...


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    ANTI-REJECTION DRUG RAPAMYCIN SHOWS PROMISE IN LIVER CANCER

    Feb 01, 2019

    Scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine were studying the cells that surround the liver’s central vein when they made a serendipitous discovery. Cells with a mutation in a gene called β-catenin also made high levels of the mTOR protein—a fault that they believe...


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    JANSSEN AND MEIRAGTX SIGN $440 MILLION DEAL TO DEVELOP GENE THERAPIES FOR EYE DISEASES

    Jan 31, 2019

    Janssen Pharmaceutical, a Johnson & Johnson company, inked a worldwide collaboration and license deal with MeiraGTx to develop, manufacture and commercialize a portfolio of drugs for inherited retinal diseases. The portfolio includes product candidates for achromatopsia (ACHM) caused by mutation...


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    A NEW APPROACH TO PERIPHERAL NERVE INJURY? NATURAL KILLER CELLS IN THE IMMUNE SYSTEM COULD PRESENT A TARGET

    Jan 31, 2019

    In animal models of a totally crushed peripheral nerve, the damaged axons are broken down, allowing healthy ones to regrow. But humans rarely suffer complete axonal damage. Instead, axons tend to be partially damaged, causing neuropathic pain—a difficult-to-treat, chronic pain associated with ...


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    ALEXION BAGS OPTION ON CAELUM TO BOOST HEMATOLOGY FRANCHISE

    Jan 31, 2019

    Alexion has gained an option to buy Caelum Biosciences for its light chain (AL) amyloidosis candidate. The deal sees Alexion take an equity stake in the Fortress Biotech subsidiary and commit to a package that could top $500 million. Caelum landed the deal on the strength of the potential of its lea...


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    AN UNEXPECTED MODE OF ACTION FOR AN ANTIBODY

    Jan 31, 2019

    Studies of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from survivors of the coronavirus-induced severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle-East respiratory syndrome (MERS) are unveiling surprising immune defense tactics against fatal viruses. Atomic and molecular information about the workings of ...


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    CELLS THAT DESTROY THE INTESTINE

    Jan 30, 2019

    Patients affected by the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases Morbus Crohn and ulcerative colitis often suffer from flare-ups, which damage intestinal tissue. Despite advances in treating these diseases with medication, associated chronic inflammation cannot be kept sufficiently in check for a number...


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    NEW ANTI-MALARIA DRUG FINDINGS REPORTED

    Jan 30, 2019

    Artemisinin is derived from the leaves and flowers of the annual mugwort (Artemisia annua) and has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. Chinese researcher Tu Youyou recently tested its effectiveness, winning the Nobel Prize in 2015. Artemisinin and its semi-synthetic derivatives&...


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    NEW 3-D IMAGING TECHNIQUE REVEALS HOW PANCREATIC CANCERS START

    Jan 30, 2019

    A new technique to study tissue samples in 3-D has revealed that pancreatic cancers can start and grow in two distinct ways, solving a decades-old mystery of how tumors form. The new method could help researchers to get more information from tissue biopsies and may lead to improved treatments for pa...


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    NOVEL AUTISM MOUSE MODEL BASED ON AN EPIGENETIC GENE DEVELOPED

    Jan 30, 2019

    The causes of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are diverse and to some extent, unknown. But without doubt, they are complex, layered and deeply nuanced. In a study published January 17, 2019, in Translational Psychiatry, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine describe how...


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    SCIENTISTS GENERATE, TRACK DEVELOPMENT OF MYELIN-PRODUCING BRAIN CELLS

    Jan 29, 2019

    Studying human oligodendrocytes, which provide insulation for nerve cells, has been challenging. But a new way of generating stem-cell-derived, three-dimensional brain-cell cultures is paying off. For proper brain function, it's crucial that certain neurons be wrapped with myelin, a coating that...


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    IN SIMPLE BACTERIA, SCIENTISTS FIND NEW EVIDENCE OF COMPLEX IMMUNITY

    Jan 29, 2019

    Bacteria have lots of enemies. Among them are rivaling bacteria, viruses, and even DNA namely, a special type of DNA called a plasmid, which can infect a microbe and hijack its inner resources to replicate. Luckily for them, bacteria have evolved remarkably flexible tactics for fighting off infectio...


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    RESEARCH SHEDS LIGHT ON BODY CLOCK AND LINKS TO MENTAL HEALTH AND DISEASE

    Jan 29, 2019

    A large-scale genomic analysis has revealed some of the inner workings of the body clock, shedding new light on how it links to mental health and disease. The study, published in Nature Communications, suggests that being genetically programmed to rise early may lead to greater well-being and a lowe...


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    SET OF GENES PREDICTS SEVERITY OF DENGUE, STUDY REPORTS

    Jan 29, 2019

    There's no such thing as a "good" case of dengue fever, but some are worse than others, and it's difficult to determine which patients will make a smooth recovery and which may find their condition life-threatening. Now, after scouring the gene expression of hundreds of patients in...


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    MEASURING FORCES OF LIVING CELLS AND MICROORGANISMS

    Jan 28, 2019

    Forces exerted by a living cell or a microorganism are tiny, often no larger than a few nanonewtons. For comparison, one nanonewton is the weight of one part in a billion of a typical chocolate bar. Yet, for biological cells and microbes, these forces are enough to allow cells to stick to a surface ...


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    RESEARCHERS DEVELOP URINE TEST FOR BLADDER CANCER

    Jan 28, 2019

    Researchers at the School of Medicine have developed a highly sensitive urine test for diagnosing and monitoring bladder cancer. The test involves looking for fragments of cancer DNA in urine samples. "This study describes a new diagnostic approach to bladder cancer focused on the analysis of u...


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    A SOLID SCAFFOLDING FOR CELLS

    Jan 28, 2019

    To perform the task for which they have been synthesized, proteins must first assemble to form effective cellular "machines." But how do they recognize their partners at the right time? Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) have deciphered the fundamental role of the Not1 protein...


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    INJECTION OF OPIOIDS LINKED TO SIGNIFICANT INCREASE IN BACTERIAL HEART INFECTIONS

    Jan 28, 2019

    People who inject drugs are at high risk for a number of health issues. In a new study from ICES, Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University, researchers discovered a significant rise in the risk of infective endocarditis, a serious heart infection, among Ontarians who inject drugs. Whe...


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    PROTEIN PROMOTES SMALL ARTERY GROWTH TO DAMAGED HEART TISSUE IN MICE, STUDY FINDS

    Jan 24, 2019

    A collaboration between basic and clinical scientists at Stanford University has revealed a protein that promotes the growth of small arteries leading into oxygen-starved heart tissues in mice. Kristy Red-Horse, Ph.D., associate professor of biology, and Joseph Woo, MD, professor of cardiothoracic s...


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    SLIM PEOPLE HAVE A GENETIC ADVANTAGE WHEN IT COMES TO MAINTAINING THEIR WEIGHT

    Jan 24, 2019

    In the largest study of its kind to date, Cambridge researchers have looked at why some people manage to stay thin while others gain weight easily. They have found that the genetic dice are loaded in favour of thin people and against those at the obese end of the spectrum. More than six in ten adult...


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    HBOT SHOWED IMPROVEMENT IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

    Jan 24, 2019

    Dr. Paul Harch, Clinical Professor and Director of Hyperbaric Medicine at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and Dr. Edward Fogarty, Chairman of Radiology at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine, report the first PET scan-documented case of improvement in brain metabolism in Alz...


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    FROG EGGS HELP RESEARCHERS UNDERSTAND REPAIR OF DNA DAMAGES

    Jan 23, 2019

    The DNA replication process in which cells divide to create new cells also triggers the repair of DNA damage, researchers from the University of Copenhagen report in a new study. The researchers studied extracts from frog eggs, which have proteins very similar to those of human cells. The researcher...


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    BREAKTHROUGH IN UNDERSTANDING MALE INFERTILITY

    Jan 23, 2019

    Hope has emerged for infertile men as scientists at Newcastle University have understood the importance of a gene in regulating the production of fully-functioning sperm. For the first time, experts have identified the role of the gene, RBMXL2, which is very similar to a possible infertility gene fo...


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    NEW 3-D NANOPRINTING STRATEGY OPENS DOOR TO REVOLUTION IN MEDICINE, ROBOTICS

    Jan 23, 2019

    Engineers at the University of Maryland (UMD) have created the first 3-D-printed fluid circuit element so tiny that 10 could rest on the width of a human hair. The diode ensures fluids move in only a single direction—a critical feature for products like implantable devices that release therapi...


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    RESEARCHERS FIRST TO USE CRISPR/CAS9 TO CONTROL GENETIC INHERITANCE IN MICE

    Jan 23, 2019

    Biologists at the University of California San Diego have developed the world's first CRISPR/Cas9-based approach to control genetic inheritance in a mammal. Scientists around the world have been using CRISPR/Cas9 in a variety of plant and animal species to edit genetic information. One approach ...


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    POSSIBLE LINK BETWEEN ROTAVIRUS VACCINE AND DECLINE IN TYPE 1 DIABETES

    Jan 22, 2019

    A drop in the number of young children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes could be associated with the introduction of routine rotavirus vaccination of Australian infants, according to a new study by Melbourne researchers. The researchers investigated the number of Australian children diagnosed with typ...


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    WREN RAISES £18M TO DRUG PROTEIN-MISFOLDING DISEASES

    Jan 22, 2019

    Wren Therapeutics has raised £18 million ($23 million). The British biotech will use the series A round to advance its research into drugs to treat protein-misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Researchers at the University of Cambridge and Lund University founded Wren in 2016 to adva...


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    HUMAN RESPIRATORY VIRUSES CONTINUE TO SPREAD IN WILD CHIMPANZEES

    Jan 22, 2019

    Less than two years after the first report of wild chimpanzees in Uganda dying as a result of a human "common cold" virus, a new study has identified two other respiratory viruses of human origin in chimpanzee groups in the same forest. Writing this week (Jan. 21, 2019) in the journal Emer...


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    SCIENTISTS EXAMINE HOW AN IMMUNE SYSTEM PROTEIN HELPS SUPPRESS HIV

    Jan 22, 2019

    Much of the research on HIV has focused on preventing infection but little is understood about how the body keeps the virus in check post-infection. A new study by Yale investigators reveals the role of a protein that serves to block HIV gene expression once it has entered human cells. The research ...


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    ROLE OF IRON IN INITIATING PROGRAMMED CELL DEATH

    Jan 21, 2019

    Health care professionals from I.M. Sechenov Moscow State Medical University published a review of scientific articles to illustrate how the atoms of iron initiate ferroptosis - programmed cell death. The article was published in the Free Radical Biology and Medicine journal. Iron is a part of many ...


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    GENE THERAPY PROMOTES NERVE REGENERATION

    Jan 21, 2019

    Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) and the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) have shown that treatment using gene therapy leads to faster recovery after nerve damage. By combining a surgical repair procedure with gene therapy, the survival of nerve cells and the ...


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    IT'S A KNOCKOUT: MOUSE MIRNA PAIR PROVIDES CANCER INSIGHT

    Jan 21, 2019

    A team at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) has revealed the molecule to cancer development, showing that its absence leads to dysregulation of the cell cycle, albeit with differing cancer-related outcomes. Tokyo, Japan - The abnormal expression of different classes of molecules are known t...


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    CELGENE SIGNS BRACE OF IMMUNO-ONCOLOGY DEALS WITH US BIOTECHS

    Jan 21, 2019

    Despite a looming takeover by Bristol-Myers Squibb, Celgene hasn’t stopped making pipeline-boosting deals. It’s just added two more partnerships for new drug and cell-based cancer immunotherapies. First up is a licensing deal with Kyn Therapeutics, in which Celgene is paying $80 million ...


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    NANOPARTICLE BREAKTHROUGH IN THE FIGHT AGAINST CANCER

    Jan 18, 2019

    A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer. A team of researchers, affiliated with UNIST has recently introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system th...


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    SCIENTISTS CREATE A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF CANCER-FIGHTING T CELLS

    Jan 18, 2019

    A study by UCLA researchers is the first to demonstrate a technique for coaxing pluripotent stem cells—which can give rise to every cell type in the body and which can be grown indefinitely in the lab—into becoming mature T cells capable of killing tumor cells. The technique uses structu...


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    DISCOVERY OF ENHANCED BONE GROWTH COULD LEAD TO NEW TREATMENTS FOR OSTEOPOROSIS

    Jan 18, 2019

    UCLA and UC San Francisco life scientists have discovered a dramatic pattern of bone growth in female mice—research that could potentially lead to stronger bone density in women and new treatments for osteoporosis in older women. The researchers found that blocking a particular set of signals ...


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    NEW STUDY SHOWS PHYSICIAN-TARGETED MARKETING IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASE IN OPIOID OVERDOSE DEATHS

    Jan 18, 2019

    Many individuals cite prescription opioids as their gateway to illicit opioid use. However, while prescription opioids are involved in more than one-third of all opioid overdose deaths in the U.S., examining any correlation between prescription opioid overdose deaths and pharmaceutical industry mark...


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    KILLING TUMOURS BY TARGETING THEIR VIRAL DNA

    Jan 18, 2019

    The Epstein-Barr virus infects more than 95 percent of people, usually without symptoms. But sometimes its persistence in cells can lead to tumour formation. Now, researchers from Hong Kong and the UK have developed a fluorescing, molecular-sized probe, called L2P4, which can inhibit Epstein-Barr-re...


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    EXTRACTING FUNCTIONAL MITOCHONDRIA USING MICROFLUIDICS DEVICES

    Jan 16, 2019

    Mitochondria are dynamic, bioenergetic intracellular organelles, responsible for energy production via ATP production during respiration. They are involved in key cellular metabolic tasks that regulate vital physiological responses of cells, including cell signaling, cell differentiation, and cell d...


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    STUDY DEFINES DIFFERENCES AMONG BRAIN NEURONS THAT COINCIDE WITH PSYCHIATRIC CONDITIONS

    Jan 16, 2019

    It's no surprise to scientists that variety is the very essence of biology, not just the seasoning, but most previous studies of key brain cells have found little variability in a common cell process that involves how genetic information is read and acted on. The process, called epigenetics, inv...


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    A COMPREHENSIVE METABOLIC MAP FOR PRODUCTION OF BIO-BASED CHEMICALS

    Jan 16, 2019

    A KAIST research team completed a metabolic map that charts all available strategies and pathways of chemical reactions that lead to the production of various industrial bio-based chemicals. The team was led by Distinguished Professor Sang Yup Lee, who has produced high-quality metabolic engineering...


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    GUT BACTERIA MAKE KEY AMINO ACIDS DISPENSABLE, EXPANDING FOOD OPTIONS FOR INVASIVE FLIES

    Jan 16, 2019

    Fruit flies fed antibiotics to suppress their gut microbiome are forced to avoid the best food patches if they lack vital amino acids, according to a study by Boaz Yuval from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel and Chang-Ying Nui from Huazhong Agricultural University in China, publishing Ja...


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    EPIGENETIC CHANGE AND HIGH-FAT DIET LEAD TO INHERITED HEART DISEASE

    Jan 15, 2019

    Researchers from the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have identified an epigenetic marker and two genes that caused heart failure in the children and grandchildren of fruit flies with high-fat-diet-induced heart dysfunction. Reversing the epigenetic modification or over-expr...


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    STUDY REVEALS HOW FASTING CAN IMPROVE OVERALL HEALTH AND PROTECT AGAINST AGING-ASSOCIATED DISEASES

    Jan 15, 2019

    In a University of California, Irvine-led study, researchers found evidence that fasting affects circadian clocks in the liver and skeletal muscle, causing them to rewire their metabolism, which can ultimately lead to improved health and protection against aging-associated diseases. The study was pu...


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    HINDERING MELANOMA METASTASIS WITH AN FDA-APPROVED DRUG

    Jan 15, 2019

    For cancer to spread, it needs a hospitable environment in distant organs. This fertile "soil" can provide a home to circulating malignant cells. Recent research has shown that cancer cells from the primary tumor can help ready this soil by sending out small vesicles. These vesicles contai...


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    DNA ORIGAMI USED TO MEASURE TOP EFFECTIVENESS OF ANTIBODIES

    Jan 15, 2019

    Researchers at the Karolinska Institutet and the University of Oslo in Norway used DNA origami to demonstrate the most accurate distance between densely packed antigens in order to get the strongest bond to antibodies in the immune system. The study (“Binding to nanopatterned antigens is domin...


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    RESEARCH CONFIRMS NERVE CELLS MADE FROM SKIN CELLS ARE A VALID LAB MODEL FOR STUDYING DISEASE

    Jan 15, 2019

    The incidence of some neurological diseases—especially those related to aging, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases—is increasing. To better understand these conditions and evaluate potential new treatments, researchers need accurate models that they can study in the lab....


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    LIFE-THREATENING LUNG DISEASE AVERTED IN EXPERIMENTAL MODELS

    Jan 14, 2019

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal condition that leaves lung tissue permanently scarred and leads to the decline and eventual failure of the respiratory system. For those diagnosed with the disease, treatment options are limited and the prognosis is poor. But a new study published Janua...


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    BREAST CANCER CELLS IN MICE TRICKED INTO TURNING INTO FAT CELLS

    Jan 14, 2019

    As cancer cells respond to cues in their microenvironment, they can enter a highly plastic state in which they are susceptible to transdifferentiation into a different type of cell. Researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland exploited this critical phase, known as an epithelial-mesenchyma...


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    BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER BREAKDOWN AN EARLY DRIVER OF DEMENTIA, STUDY SAYS

    Jan 14, 2019

    Leaky capillaries in the brain portend early onset of Alzheimer's disease as they signal cognitive impairment before hallmark toxic proteins amyloid and tau appear, new USC research shows. The findings, which appear in the Jan. 14 issue of Nature Medicine, could help with earlier diagnosis and s...


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    DRUG HOBBLES DEADLY LIVER CANCER BY STIFLING PROTEIN PRODUCTION

    Jan 14, 2019

    In laboratory experiments, UC San Francisco researchers successfully beat back the growth of aggressive liver cancers using a surprising new approach. Traditionally, targeted cancer therapies aim to disable proteins borne of cancer-driving genes. Instead, the UCSF scientists prevented these proteins...


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    SCIENTISTS COAX PROTEINS TO FORM SYNTHETIC STRUCTURES WITH METHOD THAT MIMICS NATURE

    Jan 14, 2019

    Scientists have long dreamed of creating synthetic structures out of the same raw material that nature uses in living systems proteins believing such an advance would allow for the development of transformative nanomachines, for example, molecular cages that precisely deliver chemotherapy drugs to t...


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    RESEARCHERS MAP PREVIOUSLY UNKNOWN DISEASE IN CHILDREN

    Jan 11, 2019

    Two children from Europe and one from Canada, aged four, six and 10, suffer from a previously unknown disease that causes epileptic seizures, loss of magnesium and reduced intelligence. There is currently no way to treat or alleviate their symptoms.
    But researchers in an international consort...


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    NEW LEUKEMIA DRUG IS MORE EFFECTIVE AND EASIER TO USE

    Jan 11, 2019

    A landmark study co-authored by a Loyola Medicine oncologist has found that a newer targeted drug is significantly more effective than standard therapy for treating elderly patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The drug, ibrutinib, attacks cancer cells without damaging normal cells, thus...


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    ORCHARD THERAPEUTICS' 2019: PIPELINE PROGRESS, BREAKING GROUND ON ITS $90M MANUFACTURING SITE

    Jan 11, 2019

    Orchard Therapeutics started 2018 with two clinical-stage assets and a preclinical pipeline that was, in CEO Mark Rothera’s words, “not that large.” Now, after picking up GlaxoSmithKline’s rare disease gene therapy unit and becoming a commercial-stage company, Orchard is look...


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    HOW MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES THRIVE IN HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED SHALE WELLS

    Jan 11, 2019

    In survival game shows, contestants have whisked away to a foreign location, where they face unfamiliar stresses. To stay in the game, they must adapt to the surroundings and often need to work together with fellow competitors. As it turns out, the same is true on the microscopic level for microbes,...


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    VAT FAT MAY CAUSE PATHOGENIC OBESITY

    Jan 11, 2019

    Type-2 (adult-onset) diabetes and other diseases related to the obesity epidemic depend on how the body stores excess energy, according to evolutionary biologist Mary Jane West-Eberhard, emeritus scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. In the Proceedings of the National Academy of ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=24972497

    ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE IN THE ENVIRONMENT LINKED TO FECAL POLLUTION

    Jan 10, 2019

    A new study indicates that fecal pollution can largely explain the increase in resistant bacteria often found in human-impacted environments. Increased levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the environment may have different causes. It could be a consequence of on-site selection from antibiotic...


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    PROTEIN PRODS CANCER-FIGHTING T CELLS

    Jan 10, 2019

    Scientists at UW Medicine's Institute for Protein Design (IPD) in Seattle have created a new protein that mimics the action of a key immune regulatory protein, interleukin 2 (IL-2).  IL-2 is a potent anticancer drug and an effective treatment for autoimmune disease, but its toxic side effec...


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    BACTERIA HELP DISCOVER HUMAN CANCER-CAUSING PROTEINS

    Jan 10, 2019

    A team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Texas at Austin has applied an unconventional approach that used bacteria to discover human proteins that can lead to DNA damage and promote cancer. Reported in the journal Cell, the study also proposes biological mechanis...


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    TARGETING AN RNA-BINDING PROTEIN TO FIGHT AGING

    Jan 10, 2019

    Aging bodies undergo biological changes that cause a decline in the function of cells and tissues. However, most studies attempting to identify molecules involved in age-related dysfunctions have focused only on mechanisms based on mRNA transcription, a very important step in gene expression, but no...


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    RESEARCHERS IDENTIFY DRUG AGAINST THE FORMATION OF METASTASIS

    Jan 10, 2019

    The most deadly aspect of breast cancer is metastasis, cancer cells spreading throughout the body. Researchers at the University and the University Hospital of Basel have now discovered a substance that suppresses the formation of metastases. In the journal Cell, the team of molecular biologists, co...


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    CRISPR METHOD SUPRESSES FERTILITY IN AGRICULTURAL PESTS

    Jan 09, 2019

    Combining historical lessons with modern genetic technologies, scientists at the University of California San Diego have developed a new way to control and suppress populations of insects, potentially including those that ravage agricultural crops and transmit deadly diseases. Using the CRISPR gene ...


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    TWO-THIRDS OF STROKE SURVIVORS ARE IN EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD MENTAL HEALTH

    Jan 09, 2019

    Two-thirds of stroke survivors are in complete mental health despite the impact of their stroke, according to a large, nationally representative Canadian study conducted by researchers at the University of Toronto's Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. "It is so heartening to learn that...


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    FIGHTING ANOTHER VIRUS? BLAME YOUR PARENTS

    Jan 09, 2019

    Genetics may play a bigger role in the body's disease-fighting ability than scientists previously thought, according to the results from a new study of twins in Queensland, Australia. Scientists have long known that people build their own immune defense networks using antibodies—which are ...


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    STEM CELL STUDY OFFERS CLUES FOR OPTIMIZING BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTS AND MORE

    Jan 09, 2019

    Bone marrow transplants, which involve transplanting healthy blood stem cells, offer the best treatment for many types of cancers, blood disorders, and immune diseases. Even though 22,000 of these procedures are performed each year in the US, much remains to be understood about how they work. A new ...


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    SCHIZOPHRENIA LINKED WITH ABNORMAL IMMUNE RESPONSE TO EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS

    Jan 09, 2019

    New research from Johns Hopkins Medicine and Sheppard Pratt Health System shows that people in the study with schizophrenia also have higher levels of antibodies against the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpes virus that causes infectious mononucleosis, so-called mono. Researchers proposed two explan...


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    BIOENGINEERS LOOK DEEPER INTO HOW ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ACTIVATES NEURONS

    Jan 08, 2019

    Electrical stimulation of the brain is common practice in neuroscience research and is an increasingly common and effective clinical therapy for a variety of neurological disorders. However, there is limited understanding of why this treatment works at the neural level. A paper published by Takashi ...


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    NEW ANTIBIOTIC PROVES TO BE EFFECTIVE AGAINST RIVER BLINDNESS IN MICE

    Jan 08, 2019

    A team of researchers from the U.K., the U.S., Japan, and Germany has developed an antibiotic that kills a type of bacteria necessary for larval growth in the parasitic worm that causes river blindness. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes ...


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    FLU VACCINE SUPPLY GAPS CAN INTENSIFY FLU SEASONS, MAKE PANDEMICS DEADLIER

    Jan 08, 2019

    More than 50 million people died in the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918-1919. Its 100th anniversary this flu season serves as a reminder to close flu vaccine supply gaps that may be costing lives now and could cost many more when the next "big one" strikes, researchers say. U.S. flu vaccine d...


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    MEDICAL SCANNER HELPS TO UNLOCK THE MYSTERIES OF A GIANT PREHISTORIC MARINE REPTILE

    Jan 08, 2019

    A nearly meter-long skull of a giant fossil marine ichthyosaur found in a farmer's field more than 60 years ago has been studied for the first time. Using cutting-edge computerized tomography (CT) scanning technology, the research reveals new information including details of the rarely preserved...


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    NEW CRISPR-BASED TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPED TO CONTROL PESTS WITH PRECISION-GUIDED GENETICS

    Jan 08, 2019

    Using the CRISPR gene editing tool, Nikolay Kandul, Omar Akbari and their colleagues at UC San Diego and UC Berkeley devised a method of altering key genes that control insect sex determination and fertility. A description of the new "precision-guided sterile insect technique," or pgSIT, i...


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    GENETIC TESTING NOT CAUSING UNDUE WORRY ABOUT CANCER RISK

    Jan 07, 2019

    As genetic testing for breast cancer has become more complex, evaluating a panel of multiple genes, it introduces more uncertainty about the results. But a new study finds that newer, more extensive tests are not causing patients to worry more about their cancer risk. "Genetic testing is becomi...


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    ADAPTIVE BIOTECHNOLOGIES AND GENENTECH LAUNCH PERSONALIZED CANCER-CARE PROGRAM WORTH $2 BILLION+

    Jan 07, 2019

    Seattle-based Adaptive Biotechnologies forged a collaboration with Genentech that could be worth up to $2 billion to develop and commercialize novel neoantigen directed T-cell therapies for the individualized treatment of a broad range of cancers. The companies will combine Genentech’s noted i...


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    STEM CELL SIGNAL DRIVES NEW BONE BUILDING

    Jan 07, 2019

    In experiments in rats and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that a cellular protein signal that drives both bone and fat formation in selected stem cells can be manipulated to favor bone building. If harnessed in humans, they say, the protein—know...


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    POWERFUL X-RAY BEAMS UNLOCK SECRETS OF NANOSCALE CRYSTAL FORMATION

    Jan 07, 2019

    High-energy X-ray beams and a clever experimental setup allowed researchers to watch a high-pressure, high-temperature chemical reaction to determine for the first time what controls the formation of two different nanoscale crystalline structures in the metal cobalt. The technique allowed the contin...


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    SCIENCE RACES AGAINST TICK-BORNE VIRUS

    Jan 07, 2019

    Two groundbreaking discoveries by USC researchers could lead to medications and a vaccine to treat or prevent a hemorrhagic fever transmitted by a new tick species before it spreads across the United States. In the Jan. 7 Nature Microbiology, researchers describe the molecular mechanisms used by the...


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    CANCER CELLS STEER A JAGGED PATH

    Jan 04, 2019

    A jagged little protein appears to be key to how cancer stem cells differentiate and enable metastasis, according to researchers at Rice University and the Duke University School of Medicine. Rice scientists who have formed several theories on how cancer grows and spreads connected the dots for a mo...


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    IMPROVED TREATMENT FOR ALCOHOL USE DISORDERS

    Jan 04, 2019

    Helping people with addictions have become a research passion for Purdue University's Richard van Rijn, who is leading a team to make drug discoveries to support millions around the world dealing with alcohol use disorders, chronic pain, and mood disorders. "These disorders are currently no...


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    RESEARCH SHOWS GUT MICROBIOME PROTECTS AGAINST ACUTE ARSENIC TOXICITY

    Jan 04, 2019

    Research conducted at Montana State University shows that microbes in the human gut play an important role in protecting against arsenic toxicity, a problem that affects an estimated 200 million people who are exposed to arsenic through contaminated drinking water. For the past five years, MSU docto...


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    FUNGI CAUSE BRAIN INFECTION AND IMPAIR MEMORY IN MICE

    Jan 04, 2019

    Fungal infections are emerging as a major medical challenge, and a team led by researchers at the Baylor College of Medicine has developed a mouse model to study the short-term consequences of fungal infection in the brain. The researchers report in the journal Nature Communications the unexpected f...


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    THE PRICKLE1 GENE REGULATES THE DIFFERENTIATION OF FRONTAL BONE OSTEOBLASTS IN A NEW ANIMAL MODEL

    Jan 04, 2019

    A mechanically compromised skull can result from enlarged fontanelles and smaller frontal bones due to defective migration and differentiation of osteoblasts in the skull primordia (developing skull). The Wnt/Planar cell polarity signaling pathway (Wnt/PCP), usually regulates cell migration and move...


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    NOVARTIS PROVIDES DATA TO SPARK, PEW'S PLATFORM FOR ANTIBIOTIC DISCOVERY RESEARCH

    Jan 03, 2019

    The Pew Charitable Trusts announced today that Novartis has shared data from its antibiotic research programs on Pew's open-access Shared Platform for Antibiotic Research and Knowledge (SPARK). The move follows Achaogen's commitment in October to provide SPARK with data from its own disconti...


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    EX-NOVARTIS ONCOLOGY CEO LIZ BARRETT JOINS UROGEN

    Jan 03, 2019

    Ex-Novartis Oncology CEO Liz Barrett has joined UroGen Pharma. Barrett is taking over as CEO of the uro-oncology specialist at a time when it is working on a rolling NDA that could lead to its first drug approval. Barrett ended a 10-month stint as CEO of Novartis Oncology shortly before Christmas af...


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    DISCOVERY IN CELL DEVELOPMENT CHANGES UNDERSTANDING OF HOW GENES SHAPE EARLY EMBRYOS

    Jan 03, 2019

    Our bodies hold roughly 14 trillion cells, each containing a nucleus with DNA measuring two meters long by 20 atoms wide. To fit inside each nucleus, DNA coils around specialized proteins. These spools of wrapped DNA inhibit gene regulatory proteins from binding to protein-coding stretches along the...


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    OBESE MICE LOSE ANXIETY WHEN 'ZOMBIE CELLS' EXIT THEIR BRAIN

    Jan 03, 2019

    Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators have shown in mice that obesity increases the level of "zombie" or senescent cells in the brain, and that those cells, in turn, are linked to anxiety. When senolytic drugs are used to clear those cells, the anxious behaviors in the mice dissipate. ...


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    NEWBORN GENOMIC SEQUENCING DETECTS UNANTICIPATED DISEASE RISK FACTORS

    Jan 03, 2019

    As genomic sequencing becomes increasingly commonplace in the clinic, questions remain about its use and role among newborns. Can sequencing provide actionable insights? How common is it to find something important to a child's future health? What benefits or consequences will sequencing have fo...


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    SCIENTISTS PRODUCE 'DESIGNER TRIACYLGLYCEROLS' IN INDUSTRIAL MICROALGAE

    Jan 02, 2019

    Molecules of triacylglycerol (TAG), formed by attaching three molecules of fatty acid (FA) to a glycerol backbone, are the main constituents of vegetable oil in plants and fats in animals and humans. TAG plays an important role in cellular metabolism as a universal storage form and currency of energ...


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    THE IMMUNE SYSTEM'S FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH

    Jan 02, 2019

    If only we could keep our bodies young, healthy and energetic, even as we attain the wisdom of our years. New research at the Weizmann Institute of Science suggests this dream could be at least partly obtainable in the future. The results of this research, led by Prof. Valery Krizhanovsky and Dr. Yo...


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    IS HABITAT RESTORATION ACTUALLY KILLING PLANTS IN THE CALIFORNIA WILDLANDS?

    Jan 02, 2019

    In 2014, plant biologists with the California Department of Agriculture reported an alarming discovery: native wildflowers and herbs, grown in nurseries and then planted in ecological restoration sites around California, were infected with Phytophthora tentaculata, a deadly exotic plant pathogen tha...


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    TUMORS BACKFIRE ON CHEMOTHERAPY

    Jan 02, 2019

    Some patients with breast cancer receive chemotherapy before the tumor is removed with surgery. This approach, called neoadjuvant therapy, helps to reduce the size of the tumor to facilitate breast-conserving surgery, and can even eradicate the tumor, leaving few or no cancerous cells for the surgeo...


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    MYSTERY OF YEMEN CHOLERA EPIDEMIC SOLVED

    Jan 02, 2019

    The most likely source of the cholera epidemic in Yemen has been discovered by scientists. Through the use of genomic sequencing, scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and Institut Pasteur estimate the strain of cholera-causing the current outbreak in Yemen the worst cholera outbreak in record...


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    PINE NEEDLES FROM OLD CHRISTMAS TREES COULD BE TURNED INTO PAINT AND FOOD SWEETENERS IN THE FUTURE

    Dec 27, 2018

    Abandoned Christmas trees could be saved from the landfill and turned into paint and food sweeteners according to new research by the University of Sheffield. Christmas trees have hundreds of thousands of pine needles which take a long time to decompose compared to other tree leaves. When they rot, ...


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    RESEARCHERS UNRAVEL MYSTERY OF HOW, WHEN DNA REPLICATES

    Dec 27, 2018

    A team of Florida State University researchers has unlocked a decades-old mystery about how a critical cellular process is regulated and what that could mean for the future study of genetics. In cells, DNA and its associated material replicate at regular intervals, a process essential to all living ...


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    RESEARCHERS MONITOR ELECTRON BEHAVIOR DURING CHEMICAL REACTIONS FOR THE FIRST TIME

    Dec 27, 2018

    In a recent publication in Science, researchers at the University of Paderborn and the Fritz Haber Institute Berlin demonstrated their ability to observe electrons' movements during a chemical reaction. Researchers have long studied the atomic-scale processes that govern chemical reactions but w...

    GAUSS CENTRE FOR SUPERCOMPUTING
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    EUROPEAN WHEAT LACKS CLIMATE RESILIENCE

    Dec 27, 2018

    The climate is not only warming, but it is also becoming more variable and extreme. Such unpredictable weather can weaken global food security if major crops such as wheat are not sufficiently resilient—and if we are not properly prepared. A group of European researchers, including Professor J...

    AARHUS UNIVERSITY
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    LOSING NEURONS IS SOMETIMES NOT ALL BAD

    Dec 27, 2018

    Current thinking about Alzheimer's disease is that neuronal cell death in the brain is to blame for the cognitive havoc caused by the disease. But a new study suggests that neuronal death may actually be a protective reaction against the disease. This could lead to a complete rethinking of thera...


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    HEART ATTACK, STROKE MAY BE AN EARLY SIGN OF CANCERS: RESEARCHERS

    Dec 26, 2018

    New York: Heart attack or stroke may be an early sign of cancers, especially in older adults, say researchers. The findings showed that the risk of having a heart attack and stroke jumped by 70 percent in the year before cancer diagnosis. The risk was most acute in the month immediately before the c...


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    FISH SKIN CHEAPER, LESS PAINFUL IN TREATING BURNS THAN BANDAGES: SCIENTIST

    Dec 26, 2018

    London: Using fish skin to heal burns can be cheaper and less painful than bandages, says a scientist. Using the skin of Tilapia -- a freshwater fish -- on burns could be effective since it is rich in moisture and collagen proteins, the Daily Mail quoted Felipe Rocha, a neurologist at the Federal Un...


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    NEURITOSIS STUDY OPENS DOOR FOR POTENTIAL NEW THERAPIES FOR NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES

    Dec 26, 2018

    Scientists from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, using animal models and nerve cells were grown in the lab, have described a new mechanism dubbed “neuritosis” that might explain neurons shrinking in Huntington’s and other neurodegenerative diseases, opening new targ...


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    NEW AND IMPROVED SINGLE-CELL RNA SEQUENCING METHOD

    Dec 26, 2018

    The single-cell analysis allows researchers to tease apart single cells from a population, going beyond the analysis afforded by traditional bulk profiling methods. Single-cell RNA sequencing can uncover rare cell populations, regulatory relationships between genes, and determine cell lineages durin...


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    MEDICATION FOR SEVERE ACNE ALTERS SKIN MICROBIOME: STUDY

    Dec 24, 2018

    New York: Researchers have found that a common acne medication has the potential to alter the microbiome of the skin, raising the possibility of developing microbiome-based acne treatments. Isotretinoin, a form of vitamin A, has been prescribed to treat acne for decades. It reduces oil production in...


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    CHROMATOGRAPHY IN PHARMACEUTICALS AND BIOTECHNOLOGY: SURGE IN THE DEMAND FOR REAGENTS & CHROMATOGRAPHY INSTRUMENTS TO DRIVE DEMAND

    Dec 24, 2018

    Technological advances have ameliorated chromatography methods which have paved way for improved security, higher resolutions, and rapid speed of analysis and peak separation. Moreover, swelling demand for automation and data integrity has led to the integration of contemporary chromatography system...


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    CHOLESTEROL-LOWERING DRUGS INHIBIT BROWN FAT ACTIVITY

    Dec 24, 2018

    The fat that we accumulate when we put on weight comprises a type of fat tissue known as white adipose tissue (WAT), but another, beneficial type of fat, known as brown adipose tissue (BAT), acts to generate heat and so burn off energy. Although adults tend to have very little BAT, those who do are ...


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    IT ERROR WRONGLY ATTRIBUTED TO BREAST SCREENING INCIDENT IN ENGLAND, REVIEW FINDS

    Dec 24, 2018

    Thousands of women in England were “warned unnecessarily” that they did not receive an invitation to a final routine breast screening in an incident believed to have been caused by an IT error, according to an independent review released this month. Back in May, then Secretary of State f...


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    HOWLER MONKEY STUDY EXAMINES MECHANISMS OF NEW SPECIES FORMATION

    Dec 22, 2018

    A new University of Michigan study of interbreeding between two species of howler monkeys in Mexico is yielding insights into the forces that drive the evolution of new species. How do new species emerge in nature? One common but overly simplified version of the story goes like this: A population of...


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    STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS PROTEIN EXPLAINED IN DETAIL

    Dec 21, 2018

    An international team of researchers has solved the structure and elucidated the function of photosynthetic complex I. This membrane protein complex plays a major role in dynamically rewiring photosynthesis. The team from the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry, Osaka University, and Ruhr-Universi...


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    EXPERIMENTAL ALZHEIMER'S DRUG IMPROVES MEMORY IN MICE

    Dec 21, 2018

    An experimental drug known as A03, which was previously developed to treat depression, increases the levels of the enzyme Sirtuin1, or SirT1, and improves memory in mice. The mice were genetically modified to have a protein called ApoE4, the most common genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's diseas...

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES
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    ENZYME'S UNFROZEN ADVENTURE: IN CRYSTALLO PROTEIN THERMODYNAMICS

    Dec 21, 2018

    Enzymes—biocatalysts made of proteins—are hugely important molecules that catalyze the reactions and processes in living organisms. Ongoing work to understand their structures and reaction mechanisms is therefore vital to broaden our knowledge and contribute to scientific and medical adv...


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    NEGATIVE MOOD SIGNALS BODY'S IMMUNE RESPONSE

    Dec 21, 2018

    Negative mood such as sadness and anger is associated with higher levels of inflammation and may be a signal of poor health, according to researchers at Penn State. The investigators found that negative mood measured multiple times a day over time is associated with higher levels of inflammatory bio...


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    POLLUTANTS FROM WILDFIRES AFFECT CROP AND VEGETATION GROWTH HUNDREDS OF KILOMETERS FROM IMPACT ZONE

    Dec 21, 2018

    Pollutants from wildfires affect crop and vegetation growth hundreds of kilometers from the impact zone, research shows The startling extent to which violent wildfires, similar to those that ravaged large swathes of California recently, affect forests and crops way beyond the boundaries of the blaze...


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    NEW OPTICAL MEMORY CELL ACHIEVES RECORD DATA-STORAGE DENSITY

    Dec 20, 2018

    Researchers have demonstrated a new technique that can store more optical data in a smaller space than was previously possible on-chip. This technique improves upon the phase-change optical memory cell, which uses light to write and read data, and could offer a faster, more power-efficient form of m...


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    STEM CELL-DERIVED NEURONS STOP SEIZURES AND IMPROVE COGNITIVE FUNCTION

    Dec 20, 2018

    About 3.4 million Americans, or 1.2 percent of the population, have active epilepsy. Although the majority respond to medication, between 20 and 40 percent of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures even after trying multiple anti-seizure drugs. Even when the drugs do work, people may devel...

    TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
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    AMOEBA FINDS APPROXIMATE SOLUTIONS TO NP-HARD PROBLEM IN LINEAR TIME

    Dec 20, 2018

    Researchers have demonstrated that an amoeba a single-celled organism consisting mostly of gelatinous protoplasm has unique computing abilities that may one day offer a competitive alternative to the methods used by conventional computers. The researchers, led by Masashi Aono at Keio University, ass...


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    SELFISH GENES CAN ACT AS BOTH MAKERS, BREAKERS OF SPECIES

    Dec 20, 2018

    A selfish streak in genes known to drive species apart might occasionally bring them closer together, says a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Rochester. Though the vast majority of genes are essential to organisms' survival and reproduction, some selfishly turn...


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    RESEARCHERS USE DNA NANOMACHINES TO DISCOVER SUBGROUPS OF LYSOSOMES

    Dec 20, 2018

    The story of the lysosome is a classic smear campaign. Once dismissed as the garbage disposal of the cell it does break down unneeded cell debris it is now valued by scientists who realized all that dirty work also controls survival, metabolism, longevity and even neurodegenerative diseases. An inno...


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    GENEVA HEALTH PARTNERS WITH OCHSNER IN REMOTE CARDIAC MONITORING

    Dec 19, 2018

    Ochsner Health System has tapped Geneva Health Solutions to manage data collection and remote monitoring of its patients with implanted cardiac devices across the southern U.S. Geneva will gather data from implanted pacemakers, defibrillators, loop recorders, and other devices and integrate them int...


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    MICROBIOMES OF MICE AND MEN

    Dec 19, 2018

    Scientists have long known that bacteria in the intestines, also known as the microbiome, perform a variety of useful functions for their hosts, such as breaking down dietary fiber in the digestive process and making vitamins K and B7. Yet a new study unveils another useful role the microbiome plays...


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    GIANT FUNGUS COVERING MANY ACRES FOUND TO HAVE STABLE MUTATION RATE

    Dec 19, 2018

    A team of researchers from Canada and the U.S. has found that a giant fungus covering many acres has a stable mutation rate. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the extremely old fungus and what they found. Back in 1983, Johann Bruhn of ...


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    SCIENTISTS PROGRAM PROTEINS TO PAIR EXACTLY

    Dec 19, 2018

    Proteins have now been designed in the lab to zip together in much the same way that DNA molecules zip up to form a double helix. The technique, whose development was led by University of Washington School of Medicine scientists, could enable the design of protein nanomachines that can potentially h...


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    SOCIAL ANIMALS HAVE MORE PARASITE INFECTIONS BUT LOWER INFECTION-RELATED COSTS

    Dec 19, 2018

    Animals living in large groups tend to have more parasites than less social animals do, but according to a new study in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, they may also be better protected from the negative effects of those parasites. Ecologists at the University of Georgia found that Grant's g...


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    SCIENTISTS CREATE BEE VACCINE TO FIGHT OFF 'INSECT APOCALYPSE'

    Dec 14, 2018

    Scientists in Finland have developed what they believe is the world's first vaccine to protect bees against disease, raising hopes for tackling the drastic decline in insect numbers which could cause a global food crisis. Bees are vital for growing the world's food as they help fertilize thr...


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    STUDY PEELS BACK DETAILS ON MAMMALIAN KERATIN GENES AND ADAPTATION TO LIVING ON LAND OR SEA

    Dec 14, 2018

    Whether by land or by sea, mammals live in a diverse variety of protective skins adapted against the elements, from swimming in the deepest azure oceans to climbing precipitous mountain peaks. Now, Medical University of Vienna professor Leopold Eckhart and colleagues have performed one of the larges...


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    COLLAGEN NANOFIBRILS IN MAMMALIAN TISSUES GET STRONGER WITH EXERCISE

    Dec 14, 2018

    Collagen is the fundamental building block of muscles, tissues, tendons, and ligaments in mammals. It is also widely used in reconstructive and cosmetic surgery. Although scientists have a good understanding of how it behaves at the tissue-level, some key mechanical properties of collagen at the nan...


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    RNA PROCESSING AND ANTIVIRAL IMMUNITY

    Dec 14, 2018

    The RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) are intracellular enzyme sentries that detect viral infection and initiate the first line of antiviral defense. The cellular molecules that activate RLRs in vivo are not clear. John Karijolich, Ph.D., and colleagues have made the surprising discovery that host-derived...


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    A PAINLESS ADHESIVE: ADHESIVES FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS CAN BE DETACHED WITH LIGHT

    Dec 14, 2018

    Pulling off a Band-Aid may soon get a lot less painful. Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and Xi'an Jiaotong University in China have developed a new type of adhesive that can strongly adhere wet materials such as hydrogel and living t...

    SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCES
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    NEUROSCIENTISTS UNCOVER SENSORY SWITCHES CONTROLLING INFANTICIDE AND PARENTAL BEHAVIOR

    Dec 13, 2018

    Many species of mammals have evolved what appear to be paradoxical behaviours towards their young. Like humans, most exhibit nurturing, protective behaviours, and in some circumstances even act as surrogate parents. However, virgin males often engage in infanticide as a strategy to propagate their o...


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    ORCHARD EXPECTS TO HIRE 100, EXPANDS GENE THERAPY MANUFACTURING IN BAY AREA

    Dec 13, 2018

    Orchard Therapeutics is expanding its physical footprint in California. The U.K.-based company signed a long-term lease to build out a gene therapy manufacturing facility in Fremont, Calif. The 150,000-square-foot facility will add to the company’s presence in the Bay Area. In its announcement...


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    THE 'GREYING' OF T CELLS: SCIENTISTS PINPOINT METABOLIC PATHWAY BEHIND AGE-RELATED IMMUNITY LOSS

    Dec 13, 2018

    The elderly suffer more serious complications from infections and benefit less from the vaccination than the general population. Scientists have long known that a weakened immune system is to blame but the exact mechanisms behind this lagging immunity have remained largely unknown. Now research led ...


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    HOW TEENS DEAL WITH STRESS MAY AFFECT THEIR BLOOD PRESSURE, IMMUNE SYSTEM

    Dec 13, 2018

    Most teens get stressed out by their families from time to time, but whether they bottle those emotions up or put a positive spin on things may affect certain processes in the body, including blood pressure and how immune cells respond to bacterial invaders, according to Penn State researchers. The ...


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    NEANDERTAL GENES SHED LIGHT ON UNIQUE ASPECTS OF THE MODERN HUMAN BRAIN

    Dec 13, 2018

    A characteristic feature of modern humans is the unusually round skull and brain, in contrast to the elongated shape seen in other human species. By studying Neandertal DNA fragments found in the genomes of living Europeans, scientists have now discovered genes that influence this globular shape. An...


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    STUDY REVEALS NEW LINK BETWEEN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION AND MUTATIONS IN HEART DISEASE GENE

    Dec 11, 2018

    Atrial fibrillation (Afib), a heart condition that causes a rapid, irregular heartbeat that increases a person's risk of stroke and heart failure, is fairly common among older adults. However, its early onset form is relatively rare, affecting less than one percent of Americans under the age of ...


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    RESEARCHERS MAKE SHAPE SHIFTING CELL BREAKTHROUGH

    Dec 11, 2018

    A new computational model developed by researchers from The City College of New York and Yale gives a clearer picture of the structure and mechanics of soft, shape-changing cells that could provide a better understanding of cancerous tumor growth, wound healing, and embryonic development. Mark D. Sh...


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    STOP STERILIZING YOUR DUST ANTIMICROBIAL CHEMICAL TIED TO ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE GENES IN DUST

    Dec 11, 2018

    Most people have heard about antibiotic-resistant germs. But how about antibiotic-resistant dust? A new Northwestern University study has found that an antimicrobial chemical called triclosan is abundant in the dust—and linked to changes in its genetic makeup. The result is dust with organisms...


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    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER UNIQUE IMMUNE CELL LIKELY DRIVES CHRONIC INFLAMMATION

    Dec 11, 2018

    For the first time, researchers have identified that an immune cell subset called gamma delta T cells that may be causing and/or perpetuating the systemic inflammation found in normal aging in the general geriatric population and in HIV-infected people who are responding well to drugs (antiretrovira...


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    SUCCESSFUL ANTI-PD-1 THERAPY REQUIRES INTERACTION BETWEEN CD8+ T CELLS AND DENDRITIC CELLS

    Dec 11, 2018

    A team led by a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigator has found that successful cancer immunotherapy targeting the PD-1 molecule requires interaction between cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, which have been considered the primary therapeutic target, and dendritic cells, critical activators of T c...


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    NEW LIGHT ON BLOCKING SHIGA AND RICIN TOXINS—AND ON AN ICONIC BIOLOGICAL PROCESS

    Dec 10, 2018

    Min Dong, Ph.D., and his lab are world experts in toxins and how to combat them. They've figured out how Clostridium difficile's most potent toxin gets into cells and zeroed in on the first new botulinum toxin identified since 1969. Now, setting their sights on Shiga and ricin toxins, they&#...


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    PHRMA HIGHLIGHTS IMPACT OF CELL AND GENE THERAPIES IN NEW REPORT

    Dec 10, 2018

    Over the past few years, cell and gene therapies have become significant components in the R&D spending of numerous drug companies. And more funding is likely to be devoted to that segment as more and more therapies are approved by global regulatory agencies. This morning the Pharmaceutical Rese...


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    A CODE FOR REPROGRAMMING IMMUNE SENTINELS

    Dec 10, 2018

    For the first time, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has successfully reprogrammed mouse and human skin cells into immune cells called dendritic cells. The process is quick and effective, representing a pioneering contribution for applying direct reprogramming for inducing immunity. Impo...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=23222322

    THE GENOME OF GIANT TORTOISE "LONESOME GEORGE" PROVIDES CLUES TO LONGEVITY AND DISEASE RESISTANCE

    Dec 10, 2018

    A few years ago, in 2012, Lonesome George, the last of the Pinta Island tortoises of the Galapagos, died. The last of his kind, George was more than one hundred years old. Researchers published an article in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution today that described preliminary findings of gene...


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    HIGHER RADIATION TOLERANCE FOR PROTEINS IMAGED USING LPEM

    Dec 10, 2018

    Liquid-phase electron microscopy is a technique that can be used to overcome one of the key limitations of electron microscopy – where the electron optics require a high vacuum, and so the sample would need to be in a stable environment. Researchers at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Mat...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=23242324

    BACTERIAL 'SLEEPER CELLS' EVADE ANTIBIOTICS AND WEAKEN DEFENCE AGAINST INFECTION

    Dec 07, 2018

    New research from scientists at Imperial College London unravels how so-called bacterial persister cells manipulate our immune cells. The work potentially opens new avenues to finding ways of clearing these bacterial cells from the body and stopping recurrence of the bacterial infection. The latest ...


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    EXCLUSIVE: ORCHARD CEO TOUTS TRANSFORMATIVE POWER OF GENE THERAPY FOLLOWING ASH DATA PRESENTATION

    Dec 07, 2018

    The word transformative is not used lightly by Orchard Therapeutics Chief Executive Officer Mark Rothera. He has seen the lives of children born with rare autoimmune diseases changed dramatically through gene therapies developed by his company. Rothera took over the reins at Orchard in September 201...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=23112311

    ELIMINATING THE LATENT RESERVOIR OF HIV

    Dec 07, 2018

    A new study suggests that a genetic switch that causes latent HIV inside cells to begin to replicate can be manipulated to completely eradicate the virus from the human body. Cells harboring latent HIV are "invisible" to the natural defenses of the immune system. The findings, which sugges...


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    MYRIAD STUDY SHOWS BREAST CANCER RECURRENCE TEST CAN PREDICT THERAPY RESPONSES

    Dec 07, 2018

    Myriad Genetics presented new data on its EndoPredict test, saying it can accurately forecast which women with newly diagnosed ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer will see the most benefits from adjunctive chemotherapy. The company also said the test can predict those who will be unlikely to se...


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    MAKING PERSONALIZED CANCER VACCINES TAKES AN ARMY—OF ROBOTS

    Dec 07, 2018

    WHEN MELISSA MOORE was tinkering around with RNA in the early 90s, the young biochemist had to painstakingly construct the genetic molecules by micropipette, just a few building blocks at a time. Inside the MIT lab of Nobel laureate Phil Sharp, it could take days to make just a few drops of RNA, whi...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=23142314

    PARROT GENOME ANALYSIS REVEALS INSIGHTS INTO LONGEVITY, COGNITION

    Dec 06, 2018

    Parrots are famously talkative, and a blue-fronted Amazon parrot named Moises—or at least its genome—is telling scientists volumes about the longevity and highly developed cognitive abilities that give parrots so much in common with humans. Perhaps someday, it will also provide clues abo...


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    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER INFORMATION ABOUT A GENE THAT HELPS DEFINE US AS HUMANS

    Dec 06, 2018

    University of Otago researchers has discovered information about a gene that sets primates—great apes and humans—apart from other mammals, through the study of a rare developmental brain disorder. Dr. Adam O'Neill carried out the research as part of his Ph.D. at the University of Ota...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=23032303

    HOW MOLECULAR PARTNERS FORM DYNAMIC SCAFFOLDING FOR PROTEIN MACHINERY

    Dec 06, 2018

    Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have mapped key details of how molecular partners regulate the assembly of protein-making factories called ribosomes. The findings, published in the journal Nature Communications, add a piece to the puzzle of ribosome assembly. The results may ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=23042304

    ROCHE AIMS FOR KADCYLA EXPANSION WITH NEW EARLY BREAST CANCER DATA

    Dec 05, 2018

    Roche is hoping to grow sales for new drugs as biosim competition begins to erode its top blockbusters, and now the drugmaker has unveiled new data that just might give its breast cancer drug Kadcyla a boost. At the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium on Wednesday, Roche presented data showing post-...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22942294

    USING WATER AND GOLD, AUSTRALIAN RESEARCHERS DISCOVER ‘UNIVERSAL CANCER BIOMARKER’

    Dec 05, 2018

    Australian researchers at the University of Queensland have discovered a unique DNA structure that appears to be shared by many cancers and could be used to develop a simple diagnostic test that could be performed in under 10 minutes with the naked eye. When circulating tumor DNA fragments are place...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22952295

    SCIENTISTS DESIGN WAY TO TRACK STEPS OF CELLS' DEVELOPMENT

    Dec 05, 2018

    Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a new tool described as a "flight data recorder" for developing cells, illuminating the paths cells take as they progress from one type to another. Scientists hope to one day be able to take skin cells from ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22962296

    SANOFI MERGES BIOLOGY AND TECH WITH RESEARCH DEAL FOR DIGITAL ASTHMA LAB

    Dec 05, 2018

    Sanofi plans to take asthma research where it has not gone before. A new partnership with Mount Sinai Health System and advanced analytics firm Sema4 will create a digital asthma laboratory where sophisticated digital technology can be applied to and used to gather new forms of real-world and clinic...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22972297

    T-CELLS ENGINEERED TO RECOGNISE TUMOURS EXPRESSING THE CD30 PROTEIN MARKER

    Dec 04, 2018

    Researchers have reported promising early results from a clinical study of an investigational cellular immunotherapy that used a patient’s own, genetically engineered immune cells to recognize and fight Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells. The researchers presented preliminary results from ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22862286

    THE DISTANCE OF MICROBIAL COMPETITIONS SHAPES THEIR COMMUNITY STRUCTURES

    Dec 04, 2018

    Inside the microbial communities that populate our world, microbes are fighting for their lives. These tiny organisms are in the soil, in the oceans, and in the human body. Microbes play several important roles—they can decompose waste, make oxygen and promote human health. Within communities,...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22872287

    NEW PARKINSON'S DISEASE DRUG TARGET REVEALED THROUGH STUDY OF FATTY ACIDS

    Dec 04, 2018

    The human brain is rich in lipids. Investigators studying Parkinson's disease (PD) have become increasingly interested in lipids since both molecular and genetic studies have pointed to the disruption of the balance of the brain's lipids as a potentially critical contributor to this disease....


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22882288

    ELIMINATING MICROGLIA PREVENTS HEIGHTENED IMMUNE SENSITIVITY AFTER STRESS

    Dec 04, 2018

    Using an animal model of chronic stress, researchers at The Ohio State University have shown that the immune cells of the brain, called microglia, hold unique signatures of chronic stress that leave the animal more sensitive to future stressful experiences, evident by increased anxiety and immune re...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22892289

    CLEVER REPURPOSING OF BIOLOGICAL TOOL GIVES RESEARCHERS NEW CLUES AS TO HOW THE FLU REMAINS SO SUCCESSFUL

    Dec 03, 2018

    Scientists have known for decades that a flu virus in a human body can be a lot different than viruses grown in a lab. As opposed to the uniform, spherical, textbook-style viruses in a petri dish, in humans, they vary in shape and composition particularly the abundance of certain proteins even if th...


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    NEW DRUG COMBINATION COULD BE MORE EFFECTIVE AGAINST MELANOMA

    Dec 03, 2018

    A class of cancer drugs called protein kinase inhibitors is one of the most effective treatments for melanoma. However, in many cases, tumors eventually become resistant to the drugs and cause a relapse in the patient. A new study from MIT suggests that combining kinase inhibitors with experimental ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22792279

    EVOLUTION SANS MUTATION DISCOVERED IN SINGLE-CELLED ARCHAEA

    Dec 03, 2018

    University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers have found revolutionary evidence that an evolutionary phenomenon at work in complex organisms is at play in their single-celled counterparts, too. Species most often evolve through DNA mutations inherited by successive generations. A few decades ago, resea...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22802280

    THE LONG AND SHORT OF CDK12

    Dec 03, 2018

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes pose a serious risk for breast and ovarian cancer because they endanger the genomic stability of a cell by interfering with homologous recombination repair (HR), a key mechanism for accurately repairing harmful double-stranded breaks in DNA. Without the ability...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22812281

    GENENTECH BUYS NASH BIOTECH JECURE

    Nov 29, 2018

    Roche’s Genentech unit has bought California biotech Jecure Therapeutics, which is researching drugs that could be used in inflammatory diseases including the fatty liver disease NASH. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a disease targeted by several pharma companies, who see it as a sourc...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22702270

    WITH THESE NANOPARTICLES, A SIMPLE URINE TEST COULD DIAGNOSE BACTERIAL PNEUMONIA

    Nov 29, 2018

    Pneumonia, a respiratory disease that kills about 50,000 people in the United States every year, can be caused by many different microbes, including bacteria and viruses. Rapid detection of pneumonia is critical for effective treatment, especially in hospital-acquired cases which are often more seve...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22712271

    INCONSPICUOUS PROTEIN KEY TO DEADLY BLOOD CANCER

    Nov 29, 2018

    Five percent of acute leukemia cases are diagnosed as mixed lineage leukemia (MLL). MLL is an aggressive blood cancer that predominantly occurs in infants and has been difficult to treat. Now, researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have identified a very common protein as the single key...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22722272

    MECHANISM SAFEGUARDING UNIQUE EPIGENOME OF OOCYTES AND MATERNAL FERTILITY

    Nov 29, 2018

    In mammals, females have a limited supply of oocytes. Oocytes have a unique epigenome with approximately half the DNA methylation of sperm, and the most terminally differentiated somatic cells. Until recently, regulators of this unique DNA methylation pattern and its functional significance were unk...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22732273

    LIFESTYLE CHANGES HELP GENETICALLY PREDISPOSED CHILDREN BEAT OBESITY

    Nov 28, 2018

    Obesity constitutes an increasing global problem that may lead to serious sequelae such as heart attacks, diabetes, and cancer. In 2016, 124 million children and adolescents worldwide suffered from obesity. Now researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the Children’s Obesity Clinic, th...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22622262

    DNA WITH A TWIST

    Nov 28, 2018

    DNA replication is vital to all lifeforms, but in some organisms, it can be prevented by twists in the DNA sequence, called 'supercoils'. If too many supercoils are allowed to build up, cells vital to sustaining life will die. A molecular machine, called DNA gyrase, which is found in bacteri...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22632263

    SMALL MOLECULE PROMOTES REMOVAL OF EXCESS CHOLESTEROL

    Nov 28, 2018

    Scientists have determined the structure of the activated form of an enzyme that helps to return excess cholesterol to the liver, a study in eLife reports. The research reveals how a drug-like chemical stimulates the action of the lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) enzyme. It also suggests...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22642264

    PLACENTAL CELL SUBTYPES UNCOVERED BY MICROFLUIDICS ANALYSIS

    Nov 28, 2018

    To treat and prevent pregnancy-related disorders, researchers must understand not only what can go wrong, but when. Complications, such as preeclampsia and pre-term birth, often occur in the second or third trimester, and most research to date has focused on those later stages of pregnancy. But the ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22652265

    MECHANISM COULD AID METHODS TO COMBAT IMMUNE ATTACKS ON THE BODY

    Nov 27, 2018

    A genetic regulatory mechanism may shape the immune system’s ability to fight viral infections, and play a key role in autoimmune diseases that occur when immune cells attack bodily tissues. The study, led by researchers at NYU School of Medicine found that chemical changes to key spots on mes...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22542254

    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER CLUES TO BRAIN CHANGES IN DEPRESSION

    Nov 27, 2018

    In new pre-clinical research, scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), led by Scott Thompson, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology, have identified changes in brain activity linked to the pleasure and reward system. The research, published in the journal, Nature, provides new i...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22552255

    SINGLE-CELL ASYMMETRIES CONTROL HOW GROUPS OF CELLS FORM 3-D SHAPES TOGETHER

    Nov 27, 2018

    Scientists have developed a mathematical model showing that two types of cellular asymmetry, or 'polarity', govern the shaping of cells into sheets and tubes, according to an article in eLife. The research is a major advance in understanding the processes that allow a single cell to develop ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22562256

    PATIENTS WITH RARE NATURAL ABILITY TO SUPPRESS HIV SHED LIGHT ON POTENTIAL FUNCTIONAL CURE

    Nov 27, 2018

    Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified two patients with HIV whose immune cells behave differently than others with the virus and actually appear to help control viral load even years after infection. Moreover, both patients carry large amounts of virus in infected cells but show no viral load...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22572257

    RESEARCH GROUP SUGGESTS IT MIGHT BE TIME TO BUILD A UNIVERSAL GENETIC DATABASE

    Nov 26, 2018

    A team of researchers from Vanderbilt University is suggesting in a Policy Forum piece published in the journal Science that it might be time to start building a universal genetic database. They suggest doing so would help law enforcement personnel track down criminals. A universal genetic database ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22452245

    SCIENTISTS UNVEIL PROMISING NEW HIV VACCINE STRATEGY

    Nov 26, 2018

    A new candidate HIV vaccine from Scripps Research surmounts technical hurdles that stymied previous vaccine efforts and stimulates a powerful anti-HIV antibody response in animal tests. The new vaccine strategy, described in a paper on November 23 in Science Advances, is based on the HIV envelope pr...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22462246

    USING PHOTOPLETHYSMOGRAPHY SIGNAL FOR MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF ARTERIAL BLOOD PRESSURE

    Nov 26, 2018

    A team of researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Texas Southwestern have recently developed a new method to estimate systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), and mean (MBP) blood pressure waveforms from photoplethysmography (PPG) signals. PPG is a simple, low-cost, and non...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22472247

    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER NEURAL CODE THAT PREDICTS BEHAVIOR

    Nov 26, 2018

    Scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have found that neurons in the superior colliculus, an ancient midbrain structure found in all vertebrates, are key players in allowing us to detect visual objects and events. This structure doesn't help us recognize what the specific object or even...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22482248

    BREAKTHROUGH AS MOLECULES SHOWN TO 'AIR-KISS' WHEN BRAIN NEURONS ATTRACT EACH OTHER

    Nov 26, 2018

    All brain cells 'air-kiss' before they come together to form a final synaptic relationship, new research by University scientists has revealed. The breakthrough study reveals that molecular signaling within the brain operates in a very different way to previously thought, with cells now foun...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22492249

    UK BIOTECH AIMS TO CUT COSTS WITH DIGITAL AND ROBOTICS INVESTMENT

    Nov 23, 2018

    Gene and cell therapy firm Oxford Biomedica is to invest £4 million to build digital and robotics capabilities that will help manufacture the next generation of cutting-edge therapies. The group will invest the money, supported by a £2 million grant from Innovate UK to upgrade its techno...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22382238

    MITOCHONDRIA'S LITTLE HELPERS

    Nov 23, 2018

    The research labs of the associate professor (Privatdozent) Dr. Thomas Becker and Prof. Dr. Nikolaus Pfanner teamed up with several other researchers at the University of Freiburg to discover a mechanism inside cells that transport proteins to the mitochondria. Their research has now been published ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22392239

    POO-TESTING FOR COLORECTAL CANCER IMPROVES OUTCOMES FOR MEN

    Nov 23, 2018

    While screening for colorectal cancer did not, so far, reduce mortality, it did reduce the need for chemotherapy and emergency surgeries among male patients. Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the world. Every year in Finland, approximately 3,000 new cases are diagnosed, an...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22402240

    DNA ORIGAMI PACKED FULL OF POTENT ANTICANCER AGENTS

    Nov 23, 2018

    One of the most successful techniques to combat multidrug resistance in cancer cells is the downregulation of those genes responsible for drug resistance. Chinese scientists have now developed a nanoplatform that selectively delivers small hairpin RNA transcription templates and chemotherapeutics in...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22412241

    PREBIOTIC SUPPLEMENT MAY BE EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVE TO REDUCE GI DISTURBANCES IN AUTISTIC CHILDREN

    Nov 22, 2018

    Diets free from gluten and casein are often recommended as a way to reduce gastrointestinal (GI) problems in children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD). GI symptoms are of particular interest in these patients due to the correlation and prevalence with the severity of behavioral traits. But a n...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22312231

    RESEARCHERS SUCCESSFULLY RESTORE SENSE OF VISION IN BLIND PEOPLE USING BVT'S BIONIC EYE

    Nov 22, 2018

    Bionic Vision Technologies Pty Ltd (BVT) today announced medical researchers had successfully restored a sense of vision in four blind people with its bionic eye as part of a clinical trial in Melbourne. Researchers said they were “very pleased” with the progress of all four patients who...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22322232

    METASTATIC BREAST CANCER PATIENTS FEEL ISOLATED AND NEED MORE SUPPORT FROM HCPS, REPORT REVEALS

    Nov 22, 2018

    A new report, entitled MBC Radio Silence, released today highlights that people with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) feel isolated and in need of more support to deal with their diagnosis, and there is a growing need for healthcare professionals (HCPs) to manage both the physical and emotional aspect...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22332233

    NEVER-BEFORE-SEEN DNA RECOMBINATION IN THE BRAIN LINKED TO ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

    Nov 21, 2018

    Scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have identified gene recombination in neurons that produce thousands of new gene variants within Alzheimer's disease brains. The study, published today in Nature, reveals for the first time how the Alzheimer's-linked ge...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22242224

    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER KEY GENE IN CELLS ASSOCIATED WITH AGE-RELATED HEARING LOSS

    Nov 21, 2018

    An international group of researchers, led by Ronna Hertzano, MD, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Anatomy and Neurobiology, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), and Michael Bowl, Ph.D., Programme Leader Track Scientist, Mamm...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22252225

    ROIVANT TAKES AIM AT RESISTANT INFECTIONS WITH $667.5M INTRON DEAL

    Nov 21, 2018

    Fresh from a $200 million fundraising that pushed its valuation above $7 billion, Relevant Sciences has spent more money on its R&D portfolio, licensing a midstage drug for resistant bacteria from South Korea’s Intron Biotechnology. Vivek Ramaswamy’s fast-growing biotech group is pay...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22262226

    SYNTHEGO EXPANDS CRISPR KIT REACH WITH EUROFINS DISTRIBUTION DEAL

    Nov 20, 2018

    Synthego has tapped Eurofins Genomics to distribute synthetic single guide RNA (sgRNA) products from its CRISPR evolution line of genome-editing kits. The partnership adds Eurofins customers in 44 countries to Synthego’s market, which, until now, was concentrated in the U.S. The Redwood City, ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22192219

    STUDY INVESTIGATES HOW MDMA AFFECTS COOPERATION AND TRUST

    Nov 20, 2018

    The drug MDMA makes people more cooperative toward those they trust, according to new research. The finding offers new insights into how MDMA could aid the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. Commonly known as ecstasy or Molly, MDMA is a synthetic compound that alters perception and mood by...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22202220

    GLUCOSE BINDING MOLECULE COULD TRANSFORM THE TREATMENT OF DIABETES

    Nov 19, 2018

    Scientists from the University of Bristol have designed a new synthetic glucose binding molecule platform that brings us one step closer to the development of the world's first glucose-responsive insulin which, say, researchers, will transform the treatment of diabetes. The World Health Organiza...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22142214

    FREEZE-FRAME MICROSCOPY CAPTURES MOLECULE'S 'LOCK-AND-LOAD' ON DNA

    Nov 19, 2018

    Pushing the limits of cryo-electron microscopy, University of California, Berkeley, scientists have captured freeze-frames of the changing shape of a huge molecule, one of the body's key molecular machines, as it locks onto DNA and loads the machinery for reading the genetic code. The molecule, ...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22152215

    COULD A COMBO OF CANCER DRUGS FOR ADULTS ALSO TREAT NEUROBLASTOMA IN CHILDREN?

    Nov 16, 2018

    Novartis’ Farydak was approved by the FDA to treat multiple myeloma in 2015. Now scientists in Australia believe the drug can be combined with an early-phase clinical agent to tackle neuroblastoma, a type of nerve tissue cancer mostly seen in young children. Professor Murray Norris and his col...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22092209

    NEW WAY TO LOOK AT CELL MEMBRANES COULD CHANGE THE WAY WE STUDY DISEASE

    Nov 16, 2018

    A new technique to study intact parts of cell membranes could revolutionize studies of cancer, metabolic and heart diseases. Membranes protect all of our cells and the organelles inside them, including the mitochondria – the powerhouse of the cell. These membranes are studded with biological m...

    IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON
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    DRAMATIC INCREASE IN E-CIGARETTE USE AMONG YOUTH

    Nov 15, 2018

    Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new findings from the National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS) showing that more than 3.6 million middle and high school students were current (past 30 day) e-cigarette users in 2018, a dramat...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22042204

    VACCINE REPURPOSING MAY SAVE MILLIONS OF DOGS

    Nov 15, 2018

    A vaccine used to prevent dogs from contracting the deadly, parasitic disease canine leishmaniasis also can be used to treat currently infected dogs, found Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Iowa, providing a new avenue of treatment for millions of infected dogs globall...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22052205

    MOSQUITO GENOME OPENS NEW AVENUES FOR REDUCING BUG-BORNE DISEASE

    Nov 14, 2018

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is powerful, plentiful species: It populates six continents, can carry deadly viruses, and bites with abandon. But until recently, its genome was in tatters. For the past decade, researchers attempting to study the mosquito's DNA had only fragments to work with—g...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=21982198

    ZIKA MAY HIJACK MOTHER-FETUS IMMUNITY ROUTE

    Nov 14, 2018

    To cross the placenta, Zika virus may hijack the route by which acquired immunity is transferred from mother to fetus, new research suggests. The results are scheduled for publication in Cell Host & Microbe. Antibodies against dengue virus make it easier for Zika to infect certain immune cells i...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=21992199

    HUMAN CELL ATLAS STUDY REVEALS MATERNAL IMMUNE SYSTEM MODIFICATIONS IN EARLY PREGNANCY

    Nov 14, 2018

    The first Human Cell Atlas study of early pregnancy in humans has shown how the function of the maternal immune system is affected by cells from the developing placenta. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Newcastle University and the University of Cambridge used genomics and bioinformat...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=22002200

    KYMERA NETS $65M TO MOVE LEAD PROTEIN DEGRADER INTO THE CLINIC

    Nov 13, 2018

    Kymera Therapeutics raised $65 million in series B funding that will support the clinical development of its lead protein degradation program, as well as advance its other preclinical assets. CEO Laurent Audoly kept mum on specific targets and indications, saying that “at this point, what we a...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=21922192

    'WALTZING' NANOPARTICLES COULD ADVANCE SEARCH FOR BETTER DRUG DELIVERY METHODS

    Nov 13, 2018

    Indiana University researchers have discovered that drug-delivering nanoparticles attach to their targets differently based upon their position when they meet like ballroom dancers who change their moves with the music. The study, published Nov. 13 in the journal ACS Nano, is significant since the &...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=21932193

    'SCARING' SOYBEANS INTO DEFENSIVE MODE YIELDS BETTER PLANTS A GENERATION LATER

    Nov 13, 2018

    y temporarily silencing the expression of a critical gene, researchers fooled soybean plants into sensing they were under siege, encountering a wide range of stresses. Then, after selectively crossbreeding those plants with the original stock, the progeny "remember" the stress-induced resp...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=21942194

    NANOSCAFFOLD DEVELOPED TO ENHANCE CNS STEM CELL THERAPY

    Nov 12, 2018

    Rutgers scientists have created a tiny, biodegradable scaffold to transplant stem cells and deliver drugs, which may help treat Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, aging brain degeneration, spinal cord injuries, and traumatic brain injuries. Stem cell transplantation, which shows promise a...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=21862186

    PRIMATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ANCIENT DNA REVEALS HISTORY OF MYSTERY MONKEY

    Nov 12, 2018

    Analysis of ancient DNA of a mysterious extinct monkey named Xenothrix which displays bizarre body characteristics very different to any living monkey has revealed that it was, in fact, most closely related to South America's titi monkeys (Callicebinae). Having made their way overwater to Jamaic...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=21872187

    MUTATIONS, CRISPR, AND THE BIOLOGY BEHIND MOVEMENT DISORDERS

    Nov 12, 2018

    Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) in Japan have discovered how mutations related to a group of movement disorders produce their effects. Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study found three ways in which mutations affecting the IP3R1 protein can af...


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    RESEARCHERS EXPLAIN THE ORIGIN OF THE MYSTERIOUS PERIODICITY OF THE GENOME

    Nov 02, 2018

    Scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) have found an explanation for a periodicity in the sequence of the genomes of all eukaryotes, from yeast to humans. The results published in the journal Cell offer an alternative explanation to the one based on natural selection...


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    UNRAVELING A GENETIC NETWORK LINKED TO AUTISM

    Nov 02, 2018

    Donnelly Centre researchers have uncovered a genetic network linked to autism. The findings, described in the journal Molecular Cell, will facilitate developing new therapies for this common neurological disorder.
    As part of a collaborative research program focusing on autism led by Benjamin ...

    UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
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    CELLULAR ATLAS OF BRAIN REGION LEADS RESEARCHERS TO NEW DISCOVERIES

    Nov 02, 2018

    For decades, scientists have viewed the brain as a veritable black box—and now Catherine Dulac and Xiaowei Zhuang are poised to open it. Dulac, the Higgins Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Lee and Ezpeleta Professor of Arts and Sciences, and Zhuang, the David B. Arnold Jr. Profe...


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    ROAD TO CELL DEATH MORE CLEARLY IDENTIFIED FOR PARKINSON'S DISEASE

    Nov 01, 2018

    In experiments performed in mice, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified the cascade of cell death events leading to the physical and intellectual degeneration associated with Parkinson's disease. Results of the study, published Nov. 2 in Science, suggest promising new targets for...


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    MAKING A MAP OF THE BRAIN—FIRST-OF-ITS-KIND CELLULAR ATLAS IDENTIFIES NEURON TYPES, LOCATION AND EVEN FUNCTION

    Nov 01, 2018

    For decades, scientists have viewed the brain as a veritable black box—and now Catherine Dulac and Xiaowei Zhuang are poised to open it. Dulac, the Higgins Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Lee and Ezpeleta Professor of Arts and Sciences, and Zhuang, the David B. Arnold, Jr. Prof...


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    FORTY SEVEN’S ANTI-CD47 COMBO SHOWS PROMISE IN NON-HODGKIN LYMPHOMA

    Nov 01, 2018

    An immunotherapy combining Roche’s blood cancer drug Rituxan and an anti-CD47 drug developed at Stanford University shrank the cancers of half the patients in a small phase 1 trial. The patients, who had non-Hodgkin lymphoma, had all either failed or relapsed after undergoing at least two othe...

    AMIRAH AL IDRUS
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    CHROMATIN STUDY UNEARTHS LINK BETWEEN DNA-PROTEIN BINDING AND CANCER

    Oct 31, 2018

    A team of scientists led by Stanford University School of Medicine has identified a link between how proteins bind to our DNA and how cancer develops. This finding may allow researchers to predict cancer pathways and long-term patient outcomes.
    The research focuses on chromatin – the co...


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    IS IT BRAIN INFECTION OR CANCER? A NEW RAPID TEST COULD HOLD THE ANSWER

    Oct 31, 2018

    When patients present with neurologic symptoms such as severe headaches or seizures, the symptoms could suggest anything from infection, cancer, or an autoimmune disease of the brain or spinal cord, leaving physicians scrambling to find the cause in a short amount of time. The differences in diagnos...


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    SINGLE PROTEIN CONTROLS THOUSANDS OF GENES ESSENTIAL FOR SPERM DEVELOPMENT

    Oct 30, 2018

    A single protein regulates a battery of key genes inside developing sperm, according to a new study out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Scientists discovered the protein called Dazl controls a network of genes essential for developing sperm to replicate and survive. The findin...

    CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY
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    DICERNA AGREES ANOTHER GENE-SILENCING DEAL, THIS TIME WITH LILLY

    Oct 30, 2018

    Eli Lilly has agreed on a broad collaboration with Dicerna, sealing the deal with a $100 million equity stake in the RNA interference specialist. The big pharma company is also paying $100 million upfront to Dicerna in licensing and research fees for the project, which will see the two companies wor...


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    RNA-PROTEIN NETWORK MAY EXPLAIN WHY MELANOMA GROWS MORE

    Oct 29, 2018

    With five-year survival rates being around 30 percent for patients with distant metastatic disease, cutaneous melanoma is the leading cause of skin cancer-related deaths. The major causes of the low survival rate for melanoma patients are the limited number of options for patients lacking the BRAF m...

    TOKYO UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURE AND TECHNOLOGY
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    USING THE MICROBIOME TO HELP PREMATURE BABIES GROW

    Oct 29, 2018

    About half of babies born prematurely struggle to grow, putting them at risk of health problems that can last a lifetime. Despite years of research, physicians lack a method that consistently helps these infants thrive. A study suggests that the gut microbiome – the trillions of tiny bacteria ...


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    STUDY IDENTIFIES LINK BETWEEN DNA-PROTEIN BINDING, CANCER ONSET

    Oct 25, 2018

    Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators at other institutions have identified a link between how proteins bind to our DNA and how cancer develops. This finding may allow researchers to predict cancer pathways and long-term patient outcomes.
    The resear...


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    HOW SLEEPING MAMMARY STEM CELLS ARE AWAKENED IN PUBERTY

    Oct 25, 2018

    Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have discovered how the growth of milk-producing mammary glands is triggered during puberty. Sleeping stem cells in the mammary gland are awoken by a protein dubbed FoxP1, according to the research that was published today in the journal Developmental Cell...


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    TARGETING COLD AND NICOTINE RECEPTORS SLIMS OBESE MICE

    Oct 24, 2018

    Inspired by some of the effects of winter swimming and smoking, researchers from the University of Copenhagen, among others, have found a way to improve the metabolism of mice and make them lose weight. They have done so by stimulating the body’s cold and nicotinic receptors.
    Obesity is...


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    PEPTIDE EXPLOITS ACHILLES' HEEL OF ZIKA VIRUS

    Oct 24, 2018

    Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have engineered an antiviral peptide that exploits the Zika virus at its Achilles' heel the viral membrane hence stopping the virus from causing severe infections. This new method of attacking the viral membrane focuses on...


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    STUDY PROVIDES INSIGHT INTO HOW NANOPARTICLES INTERACT WITH BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    Oct 18, 2018

    Personal electronic devices—smartphones, computers, TVs, tablets, screens of all kinds—are a significant and growing source of the world's electronic waste. Many of these products use nanomaterials, but little is known about how these modern materials and their tiny particles interac...


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    RESEARCH GIVES NEW INSIGHT INTO THE EVOLUTION OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM

    Oct 18, 2018

    Pioneering research has given a fascinating fresh insight into how animal nervous systems evolved from simple structures to become the complex network transmitting signals between different parts of the body. The new study used simple multicellular organisms called Placozoa to reveal the beginnings ...


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    RESEARCHERS USE NOVEL MACHINE LEARNING STRATEGY TO ACCELERATE BRAIN-COMPUTER INTERFACE TRAINING

    Oct 17, 2018

    Brain-computer interfaces are typically systems which measure neural activity and convert it into an artificial output. These systems have shown great potential for assisted movement in patients with motor impairments. The interfaces typically work by directing the patient to think about making a mo...


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    NEAR-ATOMIC RESOLUTION MODEL OF EBOLA VIRUS PROTEIN BRINGS CLEARER UNDERSTANDING OF THE VIRAL MECHANICS

    Oct 17, 2018

    Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have for the first time imaged the structure of a central component of the Ebola virus at near-atomic resolution. The study, published in the journal Nature, was led by Prof. Matthias Wolf and primary author Dr...


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    HOW COMMUNICATION AMONG CELLS AFFECTS DEVELOPMENT OF MULTICELLULAR TISSUE

    Oct 16, 2018

    Using a combination of computational modeling and experimental techniques, a research team has developed new information about how intercellular communication affects the differentiation of an embryonic stem cell colony over time.
    By providing new information about the role of communication a...

    GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
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    STUDY REVEALS BEST USE OF WILDFLOWERS TO BENEFIT CROPS ON FARMS

    Oct 16, 2018

    With bee pollinators in decline and pesky crop pests lowering yields, sustainable and organic farmers need environmentally friendly solutions. One strategy is to border crops with wildflower plantings to attract pollinators and pest predators. But scientists have suggested that such plantings may on...

    CORNELL UNIVERSITY
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    AUSTRALIAN TEAM DISCOVERS HOW ONE ORDERLY PROTEIN PROTECTS AGAINST CANCER

    Oct 15, 2018

    Oncology researchers have long believed the protein Pax5 is merely a “transcription factor,” meaning it helps cells transcribe vital genetic information. But scientists in Australia believe they’ve uncovered evidence that Pax5 actually plays a much bigger role in the body: It organ...

    ARLENE WEINTRAUB
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    STUDY TRACES HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED BLOODSTREAM INFECTIONS TO PATIENTS' OWN BODIES

    Oct 15, 2018

    The most common source of a bloodstream infection acquired during a hospital stay is not a nurse's or doctor's dirty hands, or another patient's sneeze or visitor's cough, but the patient's own gut, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have found. Most patients wh...

    STANFORD UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER
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    HEALTH AND BALANCE OF THE GUT MICROBIOTA IS IMPORTANT IN THE PROGRESSION OF BACTERIAL INFECTION

    Oct 12, 2018

    The health and balance of the gut microbiota are important in the progression of a bacterial infection, according to new research. A new study, led by the University of Glasgow and published in Nature Communications, found that disease-causing bacteria were taking signals from the host's gut mic...


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    THE SIGNIFICANCE OF WATER IN A PROMISING BIOMARKER AGAINST CANCER

    Oct 12, 2018

    The Tn antigen appears in 90 percent of cancers and is associated with metastasis. Thus, it is a promising biomarker for identifying cancer cells and has become a very attractive target in therapies to fight cancer, according to Emilio José Cocinero, member of the UPV/EHU's Department of ...


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    MOUSE PUPS WITH SAME-SEX PARENTS BORN IN CHINA USING STEM CELLS AND GENE EDITING

    Oct 11, 2018

    Researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences were able to produce healthy mice with two mothers that went on to have normal offspring of their own. Mice from two dads were also born but only survived for a couple of days. The work, presented October 11 in the journal Cell Stem Cell, looks at what ...


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    RESEARCHERS MODIFY CRISPR TO REORGANIZE GENOME

    Oct 11, 2018

    Researchers at Stanford University have reworked CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology to manipulate the genome in three-dimensional space, allowing them to ferry genetic snippets to different locations in a cell's nucleus. The new technique, dubbed CRISPR-genome organization or simply CRISPR-GO, ...

    STANFORD UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER
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    NEURON DEATH IN ALS MORE COMPLEX THAN PREVIOUSLY THOUGHT

    Oct 09, 2018

    Brown University researchers have uncovered new clues about the progression of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a surprisingly common disease that causes the death of motor neurons that control voluntary muscles such as those involved in walking, talking, chewing or breathing. A team led by Anne...


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    KNOW YOUR ENEMY—LAB BUILDS AN ARSENAL TO FIGHT ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANT BACTERIA

    Oct 09, 2018

    To fight your enemies, it helps to know their weaknesses. And, the more specific your knowledge, the easier it is to undermine their defenses. If your enemy sits safely behind a giant wall, for example, its valuable to know how your foe constructed it, what materials they used, and what cracks you c...


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    BIODEGRADABLE IMPLANT PROVIDES ELECTRICAL STIMULATION THAT SPEEDS NERVE REGENERATION

    Oct 08, 2018

    Researchers at Northwestern University and Washington University School of Medicine have developed the first example of a bioelectronic medicine: an implantable, biodegradable wireless device that speeds nerve regeneration and improves the healing of a damaged nerve.
    The collaborators—m...


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    WHEN YESTERDAY'S AGRICULTURE FEEDS TODAY'S WATER POLLUTION

    Oct 08, 2018

    A study led by researchers at Université de Montréal quantifies for the first time the maximum amount of nutrients specifically, phosphorus that can accumulate in a watershed before additional pollution is discharged into downriver ecosystems.
    That average threshold amount is 2....


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    CHEMISTS ADVANCE ABILITY TO CONTROL CHEMICAL REACTIONS

    Oct 05, 2018

    Scientists at the University of Toronto have found a way to select the outcome of the chemical reaction by employing an elusive and long-sought factor known as the 'impact parameter'.
    The team of U of T chemists, led by Nobel Prize-winning researcher John Polanyi, have found a means t...


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    EUROPEAN BIOTECH FUNDING ON TRACK FOR RECORD YEAR

    Oct 05, 2018

    The European biotech sector is on track to break its annual funding record, according to BioWorld. After a big third quarter, the total for the first nine months of the year stands at $6.3 billion, putting the region on course to clear the $8 billion bar.
    European biotechs made a solid start ...


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    VIRUSES IN BLOOD LEAD TO DIGESTIVE PROBLEMS

    Oct 04, 2018

    While studying viruses best known for infecting the brain, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis stumbled upon clues to a conundrum involving a completely different part of the anatomy: the bowel, and why some people possibly develop digestive problems seemingly out of...


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    HOW A MACHINE COULD MARK THE TURNING POINT FOR DNA DATA STORAGE

    Oct 04, 2018

    Guzzling, devouring, the words fail to reflect the enormity of it all. Data storage eats up cities' worth of power. Back in March, 3M ran a presentation about data, reminding us there was not going to be anything like a slowing down of data, and then posed the question, ok, so how do we swallow ...


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    IMMUNE CELLS HELP OLDER MUSCLES HEAL LIKE NEW

    Oct 03, 2018

    Biomedical engineers at Duke University have found a critical component for growing self-healing muscle tissues from adult muscle—the immune system. The discovery in mice is expected to play an important role in studying degenerative muscle diseases and enhancing the survival of engineered tis...

    KEN KINGERY FOR DUKE UNIVERSITY
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    AVROBIO SLUMPS ON FABRY GENE THERAPY DATA

    Oct 02, 2018

    Shares in Avrobio were halved after the company reported results from the first three patients on its Fabry disease gene therapy, even though one was able to be weaned off enzyme replacement therapy. Although there were signs of efficacy and a tolerable safety profile with AVR-RD-01, investors were ...


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    NEW TECHNOLOGY COULD HELP PEOPLE WITH PARALYSIS TO SPEAK AGAIN

    Oct 01, 2018

    Scientists are close to devising technology that uses the brain's encoding and muscle control commands to allow people who have lost the power of speech due to paralysis to talk again. Recent research led by Northwestern University in Evanston, IL, finds that the brain generates speech sounds in...


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    FORBION CLOSES FOURTH EU-FOCUSED BIOTECH FUND AT €360M

    Oct 01, 2018

    Forbion has closed its fourth fund at €360 million ($417 million). The addition of €90 million since the first close in July means Forbion has pulled in almost twice as much money as it managed for its third fund. Dutch VC shop Forbion set out to raise €250 million for its fourth fund...


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    WE MAY NOT NEED TO RELY ON ANTIBIOTICS TO TREAT UTIS

    Sep 27, 2018

    Doctors tend to prescribe antibiotics to treat common bacterial infections, such as those of the urinary tract. However, a new study shows that there may be a new strategy to reduce or potentially even eliminate the need for using antibiotics.
    The new findings were recently published in the P...

    MONICA BEYER
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    BACTERIA’S HIBERNATION AND EATING HABITS SPARK NEW IDEAS FOR TACKLING RESISTANT INFECTIONS

    Sep 27, 2018

    To effectively combat stubborn infections, drug developers need to better understand why bacteria are able to evade destruction with antibiotics. One team at the University of Copenhagen has discovered a surprising talent that some bacteria have that allows them to resist antibiotic attacks: hiberna...


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    IMMUNE CELL PRUNING OF DOPAMINE RECEPTORS MAY MODULATE BEHAVIORAL CHANGES IN ADOLESCENCE

    Sep 25, 2018

    A study by MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) researchers finds that the immune cells of the brain called microglia to play a crucial role in brain development during adolescence, but that role is different in males and females. The study, conducted in animal models and published online in Na...


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    GENOME DUPLICATION DRIVES EVOLUTION OF SPECIES

    Sep 25, 2018

    Polyploid plants have a duplicate set of chromosomes. As a result, large-scale genetic changes are therefore possible in the new species, making it more adaptable in comparison with the parental species, as has now been demonstrated by researchers using rockcress.

    Many wild and cultivated p...

    UNIVERSITY OF ZURICH
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    INFECTIOUS BACTERIA HIBERNATE TO EVADE ANTIBIOTICS

    Sep 25, 2018

    University of Copenhagen researchers has discovered a surprising tactic of pathogenic bacteria when being attacked by antibiotics: hibernation. Almost all pathogenic bacteria develop a small number of antibiotic-tolerant variants. This means that a significant fraction of bacteria survives courses o...


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    MICROBUBBLE-SHOOTING ALGAE SKELETONS KILL BACTERIAL BIOFILMS

    Sep 24, 2018

    Biofilms are groups of bacteria that clump together and protect each other. They are the cause of all sorts of infections, and because cleansers and antibiotics have a lot of difficulty dealing with them there’s been a search for new solutions. Though biofilms do from inside the body, they are...


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    BREAST MILK MAY BE BEST FOR PREMATURE BABIES' BRAIN DEVELOPMENT

    Sep 21, 2018

    Babies born before their due date show better brain development when fed breast milk rather than formula, a study has found. Experts say that helping mothers to provide breast milk in the weeks after giving birth could improve long-term outcomes for children born pre-term. Premature birth has been l...


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    RESEARCHERS EXPLORE HOW CHANGES IN DIET ALTER MICROBIOME IN ARTIFICIAL INTESTINE

    Sep 21, 2018

    Using an artificial intestine they created, researchers have shown that the microbiome can quickly adapt from the bacterial equivalent of a typical western diet to one composed exclusively of dietary fats. That adaptation involved an increase in the populations of fatty-acid metabolizing species and...


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    ANTI-CANCER DRUGS MAY HOLD KEY TO OVERCOMING ANTIMALARIAL DRUG RESISTANCE

    Sep 20, 2018

    Scientists have found a way to boost the efficacy of the world's most powerful antimalarial drug with the help of chemotherapy medicines, according to new research published in the journal Nature Communications. Scientists from the University of Melbourne and the Japanese pharmaceutical company ...

    UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE
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    INTESTINES MODIFY THEIR CELLULAR STRUCTURE IN RESPONSE TO DIET

    Sep 20, 2018

    Body organs such as the intestine and ovaries undergo structural changes in response to dietary nutrients that can have lasting impacts on metabolism, as well as cancer susceptibility, according to Carnegie's Rebecca Obniski, Matthew Sieber, and Allan Spradling.
    Their work, published by D...

    CARNEGIE INSTITUTION FOR SCIENCE
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    SCIENTISTS EXAMINE VARIATIONS IN A CELL'S PROTEIN FACTORY

    Sep 19, 2018

    You can think of a cell in your body like a miniature factory, creating a final product called proteins, which carry out various tasks and functions. In this cellular factory, genes control the series of sequential steps needed to create proteins, much like an assembly line moving a product along to...

    GLADSTONE INSTITUTES
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    DEVICE TO CORRAL VIABLE SPERM MAY SPEED IVF PROCESS

    Sep 18, 2018

    For couples hoping for a baby via in vitro fertilization, chances have improved. A process that once took hours now takes minutes: Cornell University scientists have created a microfluidic device that quickly corrals strong and speedy sperm viable for fertilization. Conventional methods to separate ...

    CORNELL UNIVERSITY
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=20482048

    CRISPR THERAPEUTICS, VIACYTE TEAM UP ON GENE-EDITED DIABETES TREATMENT

    Sep 17, 2018

    Just two weeks after launching the first company-backed trial of a CRISPR treatment, CRISPR Therapeutics inked a deal with ViaCyte to develop off-the-shelf, gene-edited stem cell therapies for diabetes. ViaCyte is picking up $15 million upfront, with a potential $10 million to follow.
    ViaCyte...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=20532053

    GENENTECH ANTIBIOTIC SHOWS BROAD ACTIVITY AGAINST MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT BUGS IN MICE

    Sep 17, 2018

    When it comes to antibiotic-resistant bacteria, so-called Gram-negative bugs are the most worrisome to scientists and drug developers. That’s because these bacteria have not one but two membranes that shield them against antibiotic attacks.
    Scientists at Genentech have found a way to pe...


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    COCHLEAR NEURON DISCOVERY COULD YIELD NEW TREATMENTS FOR HEARING LOSS

    Sep 13, 2018

    Neurons in the inner ear were thought to fall into two categories: type 1 and type 2. But scientists from Karolinska Institutet have discovered that type 1 neurons a heterogeneous group actually comprise three distinct subtypes of neurons. The findings could help researchers better understand the ne...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=20552055

    OPTIMIZING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DISCOVERING CANCER CELL MUTATIONS

    Sep 10, 2018

    Cancer cells often have mutations in their DNA that can give scientists clues about how cancer started or which treatment may be most effective. Finding these mutations can be difficult, but a new method may offer more complete, comprehensive results. A team of researchers has developed a new framew...


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    FDA CLEARS BAXTER’S PREPACKAGED SYNTHETIC BONE FILLER GRAFT

    Sep 07, 2018

    Baxter International received an FDA clearance for a new formulation of its Actifuse synthetic bone graft substitute, now deliverable via a prepackaged syringe that requires no mixing or preparation.
    For use in a variety of orthopedic surgeries, Actifuse Flow uses the same silicate-substituti...


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    'MINDFUL PEOPLE' FEEL LESS PAIN; MRI IMAGING PINPOINTS SUPPORTING BRAIN ACTIVITY

    Sep 07, 2018

    Ever wonder why some people seem to feel less pain than others? A study conducted at Wake Forest School of Medicine may have found one of the answers to mindfulness. "Mindfulness is related to being aware of the present moment without too much emotional reaction or judgment," said the stud...


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    HU-MANITY.CO LAUNCHES BLOCKCHAIN APP TO HELP USERS SELL THEIR HEALTHCARE DATA

    Sep 06, 2018

    Humanity.co has launched a new smartphone app that acts as a global ledger where people can stake claims to their personal data. The company is starting by treating healthcare data as a personal property right.
    Powered by IBM’s blockchain technology, the ledger will log people’s a...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=20342034

    INSCRIPTA PICKS UP SOLANA TO COMMERCIALIZE GENE-EDITING TOOLS

    Sep 06, 2018

    Inscripta will acquire Solana Biosciences to ramp up the commercialization of its gene-editing technology. The Boulder, Colorado-based biotech aims to broaden access to CRISPR by offering new enzymes for free and to boost CRISPR research by outfitting scientists with a full suite of tools.
    So...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=20352035

    LYMPH NODE STRUCTURAL CELLS REIN IN HUMAN IMMUNE RESPONSES

    Sep 05, 2018

    Until now, the study of the immune system has focused almost exclusively on white blood cells, and T cells in particular, as the body's major infection fighters. However, new research published September 4th in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Dr. Anne Fletcher and Dr. Konstantin Knoblich...

    PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=20292029

    FAMILY TREE OF BLOOD PRODUCTION REVEALS HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF STEM CELLS

    Sep 05, 2018

    Adult humans have many more blood-creating stem cells in their bone marrow than previously thought, ranging between 50,000 and 200,000 stem cells. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and Wellcome MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute developed a new approach for studying stem cells, based on ...

    WELLCOME TRUST SANGER INSTITUTE
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=20302030

    BLUE-GREEN ALGAE PROMISES TO BOOST FOOD CROP YIELDS

    Sep 04, 2018

    Scientists at ANU have engineered tiny carbon-capturing engines from blue-green algae into plants, in a breakthrough that promises to help boost the yields of important food crops such as wheat, cowpeas, and cassava.
    Lead researcher Dr. Ben Long from ANU said the discovery was a major leap fo...

    AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=20242024

    MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF VIRAL DNA DETERMINE THE COURSE OF INFECTION

    Sep 04, 2018

    A new study reveals a previously unknown mechanism that governs whether viruses that infect bacteria will quickly kill their hosts or remain latent inside the cell. The discovery, reported in the journal eLife, also may apply to viruses that infect humans and other animals, the researcher said.
    UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=20252025

    THE NUMBER OF WEST NILE VIRUS INFECTIONS IN EUROPE IS HIGHER THAN NORMAL

    Sep 03, 2018

    A number of West Nile Fever cases in EU/EEA and EU neighboring countries by epidemiological week of notification*, 2014-2018, as of 30 August 2018. In 2018, as of 30 August 2018, 975 confirmed and probable autochthonous (indigenous) human West Nile Virus (WNV) infections were reported by European co...

    EUROPEAN CENTRE FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=20192019

    NEUTROPHIL NANOSPONGES SOAK UP PROTEINS THAT PROMOTE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Sep 03, 2018

    Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed neutrophil "nanosponges" that can safely absorb and neutralize a variety of proteins that play a role in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Injections of these nanosponges effectively treated severe rheumatoid arthrit...


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    GENETICS AND POLLUTION DRIVE SEVERITY OF ASTHMA SYMPTOMS

    Aug 31, 2018

    Asthma patients, with a specific genetic profile, exhibit more intense symptoms following exposure to traffic pollution, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health and collaborators. The study appeared online in Scientific Reports. The research team made up of scientists from the ...

    MEDICAL XPRESS
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    10X GENOMICS ACQUIRES EPIGENETIC STARTUP EPINOMICS IN FIRST M&A

    Aug 30, 2018

    10x Genomics has acquired its first startup since coming out of stealth just over three years ago. The company bought epigenetics startup Economics and plans to add its technology to its single-cell sequencing product set to launch by the end of the year, aimed at biotech researchers and pharma comp...

    BIOTECH INDUSTRY
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    NEURAL NETWORK LEARNS SPEECH PATTERNS THAT PREDICT DEPRESSION IN CLINICAL INTERVIEWS

    Aug 30, 2018

    To diagnose depression, clinicians interview patients, asking specific questions about, say, past mental illnesses, lifestyle, and mood and identify the condition based on the patient's responses. In recent years, machine learning has been championed as a useful aid for diagnostics. Machine-lear...


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    INSULIN GIVES AN EXTRA BOOST TO THE IMMUNE SYSTEM

    Aug 30, 2018

    The role of insulin as a boost to the immune system to improve its ability to fight infection has been detailed for the first time by Toronto General Hospital Research Institute (TGHRI) scientists. TGHRI scientists have identified a specific insulin signaling pathway that, when activated, revs up th...

    UNIVERSITY HEALTH NETWORK
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    BREAKTHROUGH COULD SEE BACTERIA USED AS CELL FACTORIES TO PRODUCE BIOFUELS

    Aug 29, 2018

    A new technique for manipulating small cell structures for use in a range of biotechnical applications including the production of biofuels and vaccines has been developed by a team of scientists led by the University of Kent. The researchers did this by creating an improved system to allow for the ...

    UNIVERSITY OF KENT
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    GROWING HUMAN STEM CELLS INTO FUNCTIONAL 3D LIVER TISSUE

    Aug 29, 2018

    As liver diseases continue to increase in prevalence, there is a call for metabolically functional liver tissue for transplant. Scientists from the Medical Research Council Centre for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Edinburgh have been looking at human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC...


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    SCIENTISTS FIND A NEW WAY TO ATTACK HERPESVIRUSES

    Aug 28, 2018

    Human cytomegalovirus is a leading cause of birth defects and transplant failures. As it's evolved over time, this virus from the herpes family has found a way to bypass the body's defense mechanisms that usually guard against viral infections. Until now, scientists couldn't understand h...


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    DIFFERENCES BETWEEN COMBINED, ISOLATED USE OF CANNABIS, NICOTINE ON BRAIN NETWORKS

    Aug 28, 2018

    Researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at the University of Texas at Dallas investigated the effects on the brain of concurrent cannabis and nicotine use, versus the use of solely cannabis and solely nicotine. The results, recently published in the journal Brain Structure and Function, show that ...

    CENTER FOR BRAINHEALTH
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    AN EVALUATION OF MACHINE LEARNING TO IDENTIFY BACTERAEMIA IN SIRS PATIENTS

    Aug 27, 2018

    A team of researchers at the Medical University of Vienna has recently evaluated the effectiveness of machine learning strategies to identify bacteremia in patients affected by systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Their study, published in Scientific Reports, gathered discouraging results...


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    NOVIMMUNE FILES RARE DISEASE DRUG IN EU, AFTER SELLING RIGHTS TO SOBI

    Aug 27, 2018

    Switzerland’s Novimmune has filed its rare disease drug emapalumab in Europe, days after it sealed a deal selling rights to Sweden’s Sobi. The biotech, based in Geneva and Basel, has filed for a marketing authorisation for emapalumab as a treatment for haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis...


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    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER MECHANISM UNDERLYING ACTIVITY OF PROTEINS ASSOCIATED WITH CANCER AND AUTISM

    Aug 24, 2018

    An international team of researchers has determined the function of a new family of proteins associated with cancer and autism. The results have been published in Molecular Cell. Cells constantly make new proteins under the guidance of the genetic programme. Proteins are chains of amino acids synthe...


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    NATURAL HUMAN ENZYME CAN BIODEGRADE GRAPHENE, SCIENTISTS REPORT

    Aug 24, 2018

    Degradation of pristine graphene occurs in the human body when interacting with a naturally occurring enzyme found in the lung, announced Graphene Flagship partners; the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), University of Strasbourg, Karolinska Institute and University of Castilla&n...

    NISHAD KARIM
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    RESEARCH REVEALS GENE REGULATION CAN BE DIGITAL AND STOCHASTIC

    Aug 23, 2018

    Every cell in our body has the same set of genes, or genome, and can potentially become any type of cell. During development, the epigenome mediates the process that leads a cell to become a skin cell or a neuron, for instance. If the genome is like computer hardware, then the epigenome is the softw...


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    HOW THE HUMAN IMMUNE SYSTEM PROTECTS AGAINST EBOLA

    Aug 23, 2018

    Two types of human antibodies that target different parts of the Ebola virus synergize their antiviral effects by inhibiting different steps of infection, according to a study published August 23 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Philipp Ilinykh and colleagues from the University of Texas...


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    EPIC GENETIC: THE HIDDEN STORY OF WHEAT

    Aug 22, 2018

    Globally, wheat, together with maize and rice, provides the most human nutrition. It can thrive in a whole range of different environments, even within a similar geographical region. Exploring one hundred different wheat lines worldwide, the research team led by the Earlham Institute in collaboratio...

    EARLHAM INSTITUTE
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    HOW YOUR DIET CAN KEEP CELLS HEALTHY AND YOUNG

    Aug 22, 2018

    New research shows that a healthful diet can maintain the health and youth of cells at least in women. While we typically measure our age in years, the true mark of biological aging is cellular aging. In other words, the DNA of our cells can tell us how much our bodies have aged. As we explain, the ...


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    NEW METHOD OF GENOME EDITING NOT ONLY GIVES THE USER COMPLETE SPATIOTEMPORAL CONTROL BUT ALSO TREADS LIGHTLY ON DNA

    Aug 21, 2018

    "Human cells don't like to take in stuff," explained UC Santa Barbara's Norbert Reich, a professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. The human cell has evolved a "trash disposal" mechanism that isolates and breaks down foreign proteins and other unwanted bi...

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
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    RESEARCHERS TARGET PROTEIN THAT PROTECTS BACTERIA'S DNA 'RECIPES'

    Aug 21, 2018

    Bacteria cause many serious illnesses, from food poisoning to pneumonia. The challenge for scientists is that disease-causing bacteria are extraordinarily resilient. For example, when bacteria like Escherichia coli (E. coli) undergo starvation, they massively reorganize their bacterial DNA, allowing...

    UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER
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    RESEARCH REVEALS LINK BETWEEN WARMING AND LOBSTER DISEASE

    Aug 20, 2018

    New findings reveal that as coastal waters in the northeastern U.S. continue to warm bottom temperatures in Long Island Sound have increased 0.7°F per decade over the last 40 years resident lobsters are becoming increasingly susceptible to epizootic shell disease, a condition that has depleted t...


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    CHILDREN WITH BRAIN TUMORS WHO UNDERGO RADIATION LESS LIKELY TO RECALL RECENT EVENTS

    Aug 20, 2018

    Children with certain types of brain tumors who undergo radiation treatment are less likely to recall the specifics of events they experienced after radiation than to remember pre-treatment happenings, according to a Baylor University study comparing them to children with healthy brains. The finding...

    BAYLOR UNIVERSITY
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    NEWLY DISCOVERED CLASS OF MOLECULES MAY BOOST CANCER VACCINE DEVELOPMENT

    Aug 17, 2018

    Cancer vaccines are designed to heighten the immune system's awareness of a tumor's unique features, boosting its ability to recognize, attack, and destroy cancer. To date, effective cancer vaccines have focused on what are called "neoantigens," tumor-specific peptides that result ...

    BROAD INSTITUTE OF MIT AND HARVARD
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    BIOENGINEERS BORROW FROM ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY TO GET STEM CELLS TO SHAPE UP

    Aug 17, 2018

    To understand how cells in the body behave, bioengineers create miniature models of the cells' environment in their lab. But recreating this niche environment is incredibly complex in a controlled setting because researchers are still learning about all the factors that influence cell behavior a...

    JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
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    ORAL DELIVERY OF NANOPARTICLES

    Aug 16, 2018

    Nanoparticles show great promise as diagnostic tools and drug delivery agents. The tiny particles, which scientists can modify with drugs, dyes or targeting molecules, can travel in the circulation and squeeze through small spaces into cells and tissues. But until now, most nanoparticles had to be i...


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    SCIENTISTS SHOW THAT CELLS ADAPT TO BRIEF STRESSORS BY BOOSTING ANTIOXIDANTS AND ENERGY PRODUCTION LONGER TERM

    Aug 16, 2018

    We've all heard the expression: "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger." Now, research led by a Salk Institute scientist suggests why, at a cellular level, this might be true. The team reports that brief exposures to stressors can be beneficial by prompting the cell to trigger s...


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    3-D PRINTED BIOMATERIALS FOR BONE TISSUE ENGINEERING

    Aug 13, 2018

    When skeletal defects are unable to heal on their own, bone tissue engineering (BTE), a developing field in orthopedics can combine materials science, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to facilitate bone repair. Materials scientists aim to engineer an ideal biomaterial that can mimic natu...


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    THERMAL SWITCH DISCOVERED IN ENGINEERED SQUID-BASED BIOMATERIALS

    Aug 13, 2018

    Tuning materials for optimal optical and electrical properties are becoming commonplace. Now, researchers and manufacturers may be able to tune materials for thermal conductivity by using a squid-inspired protein made of multiple DNA repeats. "Controlling thermal transport in modern technologie...

    PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY
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    NEW STUDY REVEALS PROTON HYDRATION STRUCTURES ARE ASYMMETRIC

    Aug 10, 2018

    How water solvates and transports protons is a fundamental question facing chemists and biologists alike and are vital to our understanding of processes such as photosynthesis and cellular respiration. A team of researchers at the University of Chicago used broadband 2-D IR spectroscopy to reveal pr...

    UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
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    AUTOIMMUNE RESPONSE DRIVES VISION LOSS IN GLAUCOMA

    Aug 10, 2018

    A research team from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have shown that immune cells in the eye that developed in response to early exposure to bacteria are a key contributor to progressive vis8/9/2018ion loss from glaucoma, the second leading cause of irreversib...

    MASSACHUSETTS EYE AND EAR INFIRMARY
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    SCIENTISTS CREATE BIODEGRADABLE, PAPER-BASED BIOBATTERIES

    Aug 08, 2018

    The batteries of the future may be made out of paper. Researchers at Binghamton University, State University at New York have created a biodegradable, paper-based battery that is more efficient than previously possible. For years, there has been excitement in the scientific community about the possi...


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    SCIENTISTS TIE SPECIFIC BRAIN CIRCUIT TO SOCIABILITY IN MICE

    Aug 08, 2018

    Social behavior in mouse models of autism spectrum disorder normalized when investigators triggered the release of a specific signaling substance, serotonin, in a single part of the animals' brains, according to a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. "This points to a prev...


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    SCOUT WIRE-FREE TISSUE LOCALIZER CLEARED IN U.S. FOR SOFT TISSUES

    Aug 07, 2018

    Cianna Medical, based in Aliso Viejo, CA, won FDA clearance for its SAVI SCOUT wire-free technology to be used for localizing of soft tissues. Previously, in the U.S. the SCOUT has only been indicated for use in localizing breast tumors. “SCOUT resolves one of the most difficult aspects of bre...


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    GENETICS BLOCKCHAIN PLATFORM SHIVOM PARTNERS WITH SINGULARITYNET

    Aug 07, 2018

    With an abundance of innovation already taking place in the field of genomics, the addition of blockchain technology opens the door to even more opportunities. Blockchain-based genomics platform Shivom and its partners are positioning themselves to step through that door. Last month, Shivom announce...


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    WATER AND LAND PLANTS CONTROL THEIR PHOTOSYNTHESIS SIMILARLY, REGARDLESS OF THEIR ORIGIN

    Aug 06, 2018

    Plants carry out photosynthesis and thus form the basis for most life on Earth. Researchers from Kaiserslautern and Potsdam have now investigated whether the production of photosynthesis proteins in land plants and algae differs. To do so, they examined translation; this is the process by which the ...

    TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITÄT KAISERSLAUTERN
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    PROBIOTIC USE IS A LINK BETWEEN BRAIN FOGGINESS, SEVERE BLOATING

    Aug 06, 2018

    Probiotic use can result in a significant accumulation of bacteria in the small intestine that can result in disorienting brain fogginess as well as rapid, significant belly bloating, investigators report. In a published study of 30 patients, the 22 who reported problems like confusion and difficult...

    MEDICAL COLLEGE OF GEORGIA AT AUGUSTA UNIVERSITY
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    RESEARCH SHOWS HOW HUNGRY BACTERIA SENSE NUTRIENTS IN THEIR ENVIRONMENT

    Aug 03, 2018

    University of Leicester researchers have shed new light on how bacteria sense nutrients in their environment which could provide important knowledge in the development of drugs and antibiotics to combat a range of diseases including tuberculosis. The research team, led by Dr. Helen O'Hare from t...

    UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER
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    NEW APPROACH TO SUPER SLIPPERY PACKAGING AIMS TO CUT DOWN ON FOOD WASTE

    Aug 03, 2018

    Almost everyone who eats fast food is familiar with the frustration of trying to squeeze every last drop of ketchup out of the small packets that accompany french fries. What most consumers don't realize, however, is that food left behind in plastic packaging is not simply a nuisance. It also co...

    VIRGINIA TECH
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    QUESTIONING CONVENTIONAL UNDERSTANDING OF ANTIFREEZE PROTEINS

    Aug 02, 2018

    Scientists have discovered that an ice-binding protein (fcIBP) from sea ice microalga does not fit in the conventional classification of ice-binding proteins, suggesting unknown mechanisms behind its antifreeze property. This finding could lead to a broader application of the antifreeze protein in f...

    HOKKAIDO UNIVERSITY
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    INSIGHT INTO CATALYSIS THROUGH NOVEL STUDY OF X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Aug 02, 2018

    An international team has made a breakthrough at BESSY II. For the first time, they succeeded in investigating electronic states of a transition metal in detail and drawing reliable conclusions on their catalytic effect from the data. These results are helpful for the development of future applicati...

    HELMHOLTZ ASSOCIATION OF GERMAN RESEARCH CENTRES
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    CAN OVARIAN CYSTS BECOME CANCEROUS?

    Aug 01, 2018

    Most ovarian cysts are harmless and often clear up on their own without treatment. Rarely, some types of ovarian cysts can develop into ovarian cancer. The risk of a cyst becoming cancer is higher in people who have been through menopause. In this article, we look at ovarian cysts and explain how th...

    MPH
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    INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUE CONVERTS WHITE FAT TO BROWN FAT

    Aug 01, 2018

    Brown fat tissue in the body can burn enormous amounts of energy to generate heat, and studies in humans and animals have suggested that increasing the amount of healthy brown fat might help weight management and reduce symptoms of diabetes. However, how to safely and effectively increase brown fat ...


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    CAN WE PUSH BACK THE SIGNS OF AGING?

    Jul 31, 2018

    In a study published in Aging Cell, researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison show that mice making too much of a human protein called AT-1 show signs of early aging and premature death, which are also symptoms of the human disorder progeria. Researchers were able to reverse the signs...


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    PREDATORY SEA CORALS TEAM UP TO FEED ON STINGING JELLYFISH

    Jul 31, 2018

    Cave-dwelling corals in the Mediterranean can work alongside one another to catch and eat stinging jellyfish, a study reveals. Scientists have shown for the first time that corals can cooperate to capture and devour jellyfish which are swept against the walls by ocean currents. A team including rese...

    UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH
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    NANOTECH DIAGNOSTIC CAN INDICATE CANCER OR THROMBOTIC RISK IN ONE DROP OF BLOOD

    Jul 30, 2018

    A team of international researchers led by Professor Martin Hegner, Investigator in CRANN and Trinity's School of Physics, have developed an automated diagnostic platform that can quantify bleeding – and thrombotic risks – in a single drop of blood, within seconds. The researchers ex...

    TRINITY COLLEGE DUBLIN
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    NANOPARTICLE VACCINE MADE WITH PEPTIDES EFFECTIVE AGAINST INFLUENZA VIRUS, STUDY FINDS

    Jul 30, 2018

    A new, double-layered nanoparticle vaccine made with peptides has been found to effectively protect mice against influenza A virus, according to a study led by Georgia State University. Influenza, a contagious respiratory illness that infects the nose, throat, and lungs, is a persistent threat to pu...

    GEORGIA STATE UNIVERSITY
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    NEW POSSIBILITIES FOR USING OZONIZED ERYTHROCYTE MASS EXPLORED

    Jul 27, 2018

    Any bleeding results in a decrease in the amount of circulating blood and the disruption of the adequate supply of tissues with oxygen can lead to death. An important measure aimed at correcting the pathological effects of acute blood loss is to restore the globular volume of blood. However, transfu...

    LOBACHEVSKY UNIVERSITY
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    GROWING BRAIN CANCER IN A DISH

    Jul 27, 2018

    For the first time, researchers at IMBA-Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences develop organoids, that mimic the onset of brain cancer. This method not only sheds light on the complex biology of human brain tumors but could also pave the way for new medical applicat...

    AUSTRIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES
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    HOW YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM PROMOTES FRIENDLY GUT BACTERIA

    Jul 26, 2018

    Scientists in Japan have uncovered a molecular mechanism through which antibodies influence gut bacteria to preserve health.
    gut bacteria. Gut bacteria (depicted here) are very important to overall health. They found that immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies released by the gut can alter how bac...


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    FERTILIZER DESTROYS PLANT MICROBIOME'S ABILITY TO PROTECT AGAINST DISEASE

    Jul 26, 2018

    A new study of the role microbial communities play on the leaves of plants suggests that fertilizing crops may make them more susceptible to disease. University of California, Berkeley, biologists found that spraying tomatoes with microbes from healthy tomatoes protected them from disease-causing ba...

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA - BERKELEY
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    BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES USE SOPHISTICATED STRATEGY TO COMMUNICATE OVER LONG DISTANCES

    Jul 25, 2018

    It's the way we end up with a fresh cup of coffee from a clump of beans. It's how ocean oil rigs extract petroleum from dense rock formations beneath the seafloor. It even helps explain how forest fires spread. A theory is known as "percolation" is now helping microbiologists at th...


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    CREATING 'SYNTHETIC' FOSSILS IN THE LAB SHEDS LIGHT ON FOSSILIZATION PROCESSES

    Jul 25, 2018

    A newly published experimental protocol, involving University of Bristol scientists, could change the way fossilization is studied. In addition to directly studying fossils themselves, experimental treatments of fresh organismal remains can be utilized to study fossilization. One commonly employed e...

    UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL
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    BLOOD TEST CAN PREDICT OPTIMAL TREATMENT FOR ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER, STUDY FINDS

    Jul 24, 2018

    An international collaborative study between Lawson Health Research Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, the Royal Marsden and Epic Sciences is one of the first to demonstrate that a blood test can predict how patients with advanced prostate cancer will respond to specific treatments, ...

    LAWSON HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE
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    SCIENTISTS WARN THAT PROPOSED US-MEXICO BORDER WALL THREATENS BIODIVERSITY, CONSERVATION

    Jul 24, 2018

    Borderlands are synonymous with desolation, but the Mexico-U.S. divide is something altogether different. The nearly 2,000-mile-long border traverses some of the continent's most biologically diverse regions, including forests, grasslands and salt marshes—home to more than 1,500 native ani...

    STANFORD UNIVERSITY
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    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER THE 'OPTIMISM' OF E. COLI BACTERIA

    Jul 23, 2018

    A team of researchers from across the Princeton University campus collaborated to determine how E. coli bacteria respond when they are deprived of three key nutrients: carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus. They were surprised to find that the bacteria had different strategies for dealing with each of th...

    PRINCETON UNIVERSITY
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=18841884

    DEEP LEARNING CRACKS THE CODE OF MESSENGER RNAS AND PROTEIN-CODING POTENTIAL

    Jul 23, 2018

    Researchers at Oregon State University have used deep learning to decipher which ribonucleic acids have the potential to encode proteins. The gated recurrent neural network developed in the College of Science and College of Engineering is an important step toward better understanding RNA, one of lif...

    OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
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    HOW LONG DOES NICOTINE STAY IN YOUR SYSTEM?

    Jul 20, 2018

    When people use tobacco products, some of the nicotine stays in their system after they quit smoking. Medical tests can detect nicotine in people's urine, blood, saliva, hair, and nails. Nicotine is the addictive substance in tobacco, cigarettes, and vapes or e-cigarettes. When someone smokes a ...


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    MONKEYS BENEFIT FROM THE NUT-CRACKING ABILITIES OF CHIMPANZEES AND HOGS

    Jul 19, 2018

    To investigate the scavenging behavior first author Bryndan van Pinxteren of the University of Amsterdam analyzed all video material from the camera traps by scoring the visiting behavior of mangabey monkeys, fowl species and squirrels to chimpanzee nut-cracking sites in relation to known nut-cracki...

    MAX PLANCK SOCIETY
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    NEW INSIGHTS INTO PLANTS' CONQUEST OF LAND

    Jul 19, 2018

    The Earth is filled with diverse and remarkable plant forms from the tallest redwoods that pierce forest canopies, to the smallest mosses that blanket the ground underfoot. However, these striking forms came from much simpler origins. The ancestors of land plants were string-like (2-D), aquatic gree...

    UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=18771877

    HOW DO YOU BOOST TESTOSTERONE NATURALLY?

    Jul 18, 2018

    Testosterone is the most important male sex hormone. It is natural for testosterone levels to decline as a person ages, but there are steps that they can take to slow, and perhaps reverse, the process. Testosterone is vital to a person's overall health and well-being. Low levels of testosterone ...


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    WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF MACA ROOT?

    Jul 18, 2018

    Maca is a Peruvian plant grown in the Andes mountains. It is a cruciferous vegetable, meaning that it is related to broccoli, cabbage,  and kale. Maca is a common ingredient in Peruvian cooking that gives dishes an earthy flavor. Maca root plant can be ground up into a powder and added to meals...


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    HIGH VINCULIN LEVELS HELP KEEP AGING FRUIT FLY HEARTS YOUNG

    Jul 17, 2018

    Our cells tend to lose their shape as we grow older, contributing to many of the effects we experience as aging. This poses particular problems for the heart, where aging can disrupt the protein network within muscle cells that move blood around the body. A new discovery in how heart muscles maintai...


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    STUDY DEMONSTRATES IMPACT OF TEMPERATURE ON MITOCHONDRIAL DNA EVOLUTION

    Jul 17, 2018

    A new study by researchers at Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), provides evidence towards selection in mtDNA due to variations in temperature. In multicellular organisms, including humans, most DNA is coiled up within the cell's nucleus. A small part, howeve...

    OKINAWA INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=18641864

    PLASTIC CHEMICAL LINKED TO SMALLER PREFRONTAL CORTEX, REDUCED COGNITIVE ABILITY IN RATS

    Jul 16, 2018

    Adult rats that had been exposed before birth and during nursing to a mixture of chemicals found in a wide range of consumer products have a smaller medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and perform worse on an attention-switching task than rats not exposed to the chemicals early in life. These findings d...

    SOCIETY FOR NEUROSCIENCE
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    SERIES A BOOST FOR SWEDISH BIOTECH’S SICKLE CELL DISEASE TREATMENT

    Jul 16, 2018

    Modus Therapeutics closed SEK 140M (€13.5M) in Series A financing to complete a Phase II study testing its sickle cell disease drug and to prepare for further clinical trials. The financing round was led by HealthCap, a European venture capital firm focused on life science investments, which wi...


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    /news-article.aspx?ID=18591859

    SUNK COST FALLACY IN MICE, RATS AND HUMANS

    Jul 13, 2018

    The behavior of people who remain committed to a choice, even when it is clear that an alternate choice would be a better option, has been a perplexing phenomenon to psychologists and economists. For example, people will continue to wait in the slow line at a grocery store, stick out an unhealthy re...

    UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA MEDICAL SCHOOL
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=18561856

    RESEARCHERS ISOLATE PARVOVIRUS FROM ANCIENT HUMAN REMAINS

    Jul 13, 2018

    Airborne and bloodborne human parvovirus B19 causes a number of illnesses, including the childhood rash known as fifth disease, chronic anemia in AIDS patients, arthritis in elderly people, aplastic crisis in people with bone marrow-related illness, and hydrops fetalis in pregnant women. A single-st...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=18571857

    INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION FINDS LAND PLANT GENES IN ANCIENT AQUATIC ALGA

    Jul 12, 2018

    Land plants, which split from their aquatic relatives 500 million years ago, are an extraordinarily diverse group of living organisms from tall redwoods to fragrant roses to carpets of moss. For plants, survival on dry land required some new evolutionary innovations. For instance, they had to develo...


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    SCIENTISTS CREATE NANO-SIZE PACKETS OF GENETIC CODE AIMED AT BRAIN CANCER 'SEED' CELLS

    Jul 12, 2018

    In a 'proof of concept' study, scientists say they have successfully delivered nano-size packets of genetic code called microRNAs to treat human brain tumors implanted in mice. The contents of the super-small containers were designed to target cancer stem cells, a kind of cellular 'seed&...


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    BLOOD SAMPLE BREAKTHROUGH GOOD NEWS FOR PREGNANT WOMEN

    Jul 11, 2018

    A wide range of fetal genetic abnormalities could soon be detected in early pregnancy thanks to a world-first study led by University of South Australia researchers using lab-on-a-chip, non-invasive technology. Biomedical engineers Dr. Marnie Winter and Professor Benjamin Thierry from UniSA's Fu...


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    ENZYME DISCOVERY COULD HELP IN FIGHT AGAINST TUBERCULOSIS

    Jul 11, 2018

    An enzyme structure discovery made by scientists at the University of Warwick could help to eradicate tuberculosis (TB). Research by a team led by Dr. Elizabeth Fullam has revealed new findings of an enzyme found in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) the bacterium that causes TB. TB causes more deaths...


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    THE MECHANISMS OF GENETIC DIVERSIFICATION IN CANDIDA ALBICANS

    Jul 10, 2018

    Candida albicans is one of the most formidable fungal species infecting humans. Investigating the structure and reproduction methods of pathogenic populations can reveal how they emerge and spread. A team of scientists has sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 182 strains of C. albicans from around ...

    NATURE COMMUNICATIONS
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    KEEPING UP WITH LIPIDS ON THE MOVE A NEW MOLECULAR TRACKING METHOD

    Jul 10, 2018

    In one of the older Star Wars movies, Jedi master Yoda instructs his apprentice, Luke, on the ways of the Force in a series of now-iconic scenes. The Force, Yoda says, is an energy field that penetrates us, that surrounds us, that binds us. One could say the same about expanding iconlipids, small mo...

    THE PLANT JOURNAL
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    BIOSENSOR CHIP DETECTS SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISM WIRELESSLY, WITH HIGHER SENSITIVITY

    Jul 09, 2018

    Scientists have developed a chip that can detect a type of genetic mutation known as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and send the results in real time to an electronic device. The chip is at least 1,000 times more sensitive at detecting an SNP than current technology. The advance could lead t...

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
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    CAN FASTING IMPROVE MS SYMPTOMS?

    Jul 09, 2018

    People with multiple sclerosis (MS) can find an abundance of conflicting advice suggesting that special diets will ease their symptoms. But the evidence is scanty. A new trial evaluates whether drastically cutting calories twice a week can change the body's immune environment and the gut microbi...

    WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
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    RESEARCHERS DEVELOP ACOUSTIC PLATFORM TO PERFORM LIQUID BIOPSY

    Jul 06, 2018

    Researchers from Duke University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Singaporean Nanyang Technological University have found that a microfluidic platform based on sound waves can rapidly carry out liquid biopsies. The study showed that the technology can separate circulating tumor cells...

    VERDICT MEDIA LIMITED
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    BIOGEN AND EISAI’S PREVIOUSLY BLEAK ALZHEIMER’S STUDY COMES BACK WITH POSITIVE RESULTS

    Jul 06, 2018

    A phase 2 Alzheimer’s trial once nearly consigned to the heap of disappointing attempts against the disease has re-emerged with new positive results, showing that an anti-amyloid beta protofibril antibody can slow clinical symptom decline, as well as reduce the accumulation of plaque in the br...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    SHEDDING LIGHT ON THE ENERGY-EFFICIENCY OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS

    Jul 03, 2018

    Photosynthesis is one of the most crucial life processes on earth. It's how plants get their food, using energy from sunlight to convert water and carbon dioxide from the air into sugars. It's long been thought that more than 30 percent of the energy produced during photosynthesis is wasted ...

    SCIENCE X NETWORK
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    GLASS MICROBIOLOGY: FROM THE MICROSCOPE TO THE ART GALLERY

    Jul 02, 2018

    Australia's national science agency CSIRO has identified a new gene that plays a critical role in regulating the body's immune response to infection and disease.The discovery could lead to the development of new treatments for influenza, arthritis and even cancer.The gene, called C6orf106 or...

    MEDICALXPRESS
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    MAYO RESEARCHERS FIND OFF/ON SWITCH FOR DNA REPAIR PROTEIN

    Jul 02, 2018

    Damage to DNA is a daily occurrence but one that human cells have evolved to manage. Now, in a new paper published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, Mayo researchers have determined how one DNA repair protein gets to the site of DNA damage. The authors say they hope this discovery resear...

    PHYS.ORG
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    PLATFORMS FOR INVESTIGATING LNCRNA FUNCTIONS

    Jun 27, 2018

    To aid in the discovery and understanding of lncRNA biology, newly published work from Richard and Eichhorn in SLAS Technology features the technological platforms and methodology presently used to identify the roles of lncRNA in biology. This work highlights the databases and tools used to study ln...

    PHYS.ORG
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    RESEARCH OPENS DOORS TO EXPANDED DNA STUDIES

    Jun 26, 2018

    Dr. Wonmuk Hwang, associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Texas A&M University, is researching the mechanics of DNA, the blueprint of the human body.Hwang and his former doctoral student, Dr. Xiaojing Teng, zoomed into the question: if the genetic information is the sa...

    PHYS.ORG
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    RADIOTHERAPY-ENHANCING CANCER NANOMEDICINE SECURES GOOD PHASE II/III RESULTS

    Jun 22, 2018

    A nanomedicine designed to help amplify and focus radiation treatment on hard to treat soft tissue sarcoma cells has achieved positive Phase II/III trial results for French-American biotech Nanobiotix.“Data are exceptional and show without any doubt an improvement of radiation therapy impact,&...

    LABIOTECH
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    NANOBIOTIX SOARS AS LATE-PHASE CANCER TRIAL HITS ENDPOINT

    Jun 22, 2018

    A phase 2/3 trial of Nanobiotix’s NBTXR3 in soft tissue sarcoma has met (PDF) its primary endpoint. The top-line success against the pathological complete response rate endpoint sent Nanobiotix’s stock up by more than 50%.NBTXR3 consists of crystalline nanoparticles designed to enhance t...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    DNA BARCODES THAT RELIABLY WORK: A GAME-CHANGER FOR BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH

    Jun 21, 2018

    In the same way that barcodes on your groceries help stores know what's in your cart, DNA barcodes help biologists attach genetic labels to biological molecules to do their own tracking during research, including of how a cancerous tumor evolves, how organs develop or which drug candidates actua...

    PHYS.ORG
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    THE FUTURE OF BIOPRINTING IS HERE: POIETIS AND PROMETHEUS TEAM UP TO DEVELOP 3D PRINTING FOR BONES

    Jun 21, 2018

    3D printing, sometimes called “additive manufacturing” is a way of making three-dimensional solid objects from a digital file. The limitations of what can be printed are seemingly only limited by the complexity of the design.Bioprinting is another application, and is making forays into t...

    BIOSPACE
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    WALKING MOLECULES" HAUL AWAY DAMAGED DNA TO THE CELL'S EMERGENCY ROOM

    Jun 20, 2018

    The cell has its own paramedic team and emergency room to aid and repair damaged DNA, a new USC Dornsife study reveals.The findings are timely, as scientists are delving into the potential of genome editing with the DNA-cutting enzyme, CRISPR-Cas9, to treat diseases or to advance scientific knowledg...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=18081808

    BLUE GENE REGULATION HELPS PLANTS RESPOND PROPERLY TO LIGHT

    Jun 19, 2018

    Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have discovered a process through which gene expression in plants is regulated by light. Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, the study found that blue light triggers a shift in which portion of a ge...

    PHYS.ORG
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    UNIQUE IMMUNE-FOCUSED AI MODEL CREATES LARGEST LIBRARY OF INTER-CELLULAR COMMUNICATIONS

    Jun 18, 2018

    New data published in Nature Biotechnology, represents the largest ever analysis of immune cell signaling research, mapping more than 3,000 previously unlisted cellular interactions, and yielding the first ever immune-centric modular classification of diseases. These data serve to rewrite the refere...

    PHYS.ORG
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    INVESTIGATORS SAY DNA DATABASE CAN BE GOLDMINE FOR OLD CASES

    Jun 16, 2018

    A microscopic thread of DNA evidence in a public genealogy database led California authorities to declare this spring they had caught the Golden State Killer, the rapist and murderer who had eluded authorities for decades.Emboldened by that breakthrough, a number of private investigators are spearhe...

    PHYS.ORG
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    HUMAN AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE JOIN FORCES TO STUDY COMPLEXITY OF THE BRAIN

    Jun 14, 2018

    A team of scientists lead by prof. Stein Aerts (VIB-KU Leuven) is the first to map the gene expression of each individual brain cell during aging, though they started small: with the brain of a fruit fly. Their 'cell atlas' provides unprecedented insights into the workings of the brain as it...

    SCIENCEDAILY
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    NETWORK BIOLOGY REVEALS PATHOGEN TARGETS IN THE MODEL PLANT ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA

    Jun 13, 2018

    How are proteins in the cells of a flowering plant similar to social networks on Twitter or Facebook? And how might both of those be related to the way pathogens make plants or people sick?Shahid Mukhtar, Ph.D., and colleagues at the University of Alabama at Birmingham address these questions in a c...

    PHYS.ORG
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    RESEARCHERS FOUND NOVEL STRUCTURE IN THE 'ANTENNAE' OF LIGHT-SENSING NEURONS

    Jun 13, 2018

    Scientists at Baylor College of Medicine and Radboud University Medical Center in the Netherlands have discovered that the antennae-like structures on light-sensing neurons, called photoreceptors, have a unique feature not observed in the 'antennae' or cilia of other types of cells. The stud...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17981798

    PANDORAVIRUS: GIANT VIRUSES INVENT THEIR OWN GENES

    Jun 12, 2018

    Three new members have been isolated and added to the Pandoravirus family by researchers at the Structural and Genomic Information Laboratory (CNRS/Aix-Marseille Université), working with partners at the Large Scale Biology Laboratory (CEA/Inserm/Université Grenoble-Alpes) and at CEA-G...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17941794

    TESTING FOR 63 GENE VARIANTS IDENTIFIES ELEVATED RISK FOR PROSTATE CANCER

    Jun 11, 2018

    More than 160,000 new cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year, making it the second most common cancer in men after skin cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. It’s also among the most common causes of cancer death in men, second only to lung cancer. So...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17921792

    HOW STEM CELLS MOVE

    Jun 08, 2018

    Scientists from Newcastle University have shown that human embryonic stem cells move by travelling back and forth in a line, much like ants moving along their trails.Human stem cells are at the forefront of modern molecular biology research due to their ability to give rise to any specialist human c...

    PHYS.ORG
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    NEWLY DISCOVERED REGULATION PROCESS EXPLAINS PLANT DEVELOPMENT

    Jun 07, 2018

    Vascular tissue in plants distributes water and nutrients, thereby ensuring constant growth. Each new cell needs to develop into its respective cell type in the vascular tissue. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered how these cells know which cell type they should dev...

    PHYS.ORG
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    NEW TOOL ENABLES LARGE-SCALE ANALYSIS OF SINGLE CELLS

    Jun 06, 2018

    New research led by Holger Heyn at the Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico of the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CNAG-CRG), presents a sophisticated computational framework to analyze single-cell gene expression levels, scalable to process millions of individual cells. The work, publi...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17851785

    THE ROLE OF COHESIN IN GENOME 3-D STRUCTURE HELPS FOR A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF TUMOR CELLS

    Jun 05, 2018

    In recent years, it has become evident that the spatial organisation of the genome is key for its function. This depends on a number of factors, including the cohesin protein complex. This essential complex is present in the cells in two versions that contain either the SA1 or SA2 subunit. Scientist...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17831783

    TWO-STEP PROCESS UNDERPINS UPKEEP OF KEY PROTEIN IN CELL DIVISION

    Jun 04, 2018

    Scientists have shed light on a key aspect of healthy cell division, helping build a clearer picture of the complex mechanisms involved.Detailed analysis of the behaviour of a critical protein, known as CENP-A, has revealed two complementary processes by which the protein can be replenished to enabl...

    PHYS.ORG
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    DIRECT VISUALIZATION OF DYNAMIC STRUCTURES OF PROTEIN DISAGGREGATION MOLECULAR MACHINES

    Jun 01, 2018

    ClpB, an ATP-fueled protein molecular machine, disentangles and reactivates aggregated proteins. By using high-speed atomic force microscopy, conformational dynamics of ClpB were visualized for the first time. ClpB forms open- and closed-ring, and the closed-ring was further classified into three fo...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17751775

    THE PROMISE OF REGENERATING TISSUES AND ORGANS FROM INSIDE THE BODY

    Jun 01, 2018

    Regenerative medicine holds tremendous promise for many ailments, from curing diabetes with pancreatic cell transplants to growing new organs for transplant. But because these approaches generate tissue ex vivo, or outside the body, scientists developing them all face the same conundrum: How can the...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    NEWLY FOUND GENES ARE CRITICAL TO HUMAN BRAIN DEVELOPMENT

    May 31, 2018

    The human brain sets us apart from other species, and scientists have been investigating how it first arose. New work led by Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Investigator David Haussler of the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) has identified three genes that emerged around 3.5 millio...

    LABROOTS INC.
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    THE SHAPE OF THE DNA HELIX PROVES TO BE AS IMPORTANT AS ITS SEQUENCE

    May 29, 2018

    The mechanism of DNA binding of the well-studied protein Polycomb, which is vital for cell division and embryogenesis, has finally been deciphered. A remarkable discovery, as it proves that the shape of DNA is at least as important for where the protein binds in the DNA as the DNA sequence. The role...

    PHYS.ORG
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    WARS AND CLAN STRUCTURE MAY EXPLAIN A STRANGE BIOLOGICAL EVENT 7,000 YEARS AGO

    May 29, 2018

    Starting about 7,000 years ago, something weird seems to have happened to men: Over the next two millennia, recent studies suggest, their genetic diversity specifically, the diversity of their Y chromosomes collapsed. So extreme was that collapse that it was as if there was only one man left to mate...

    PHYS.ORG
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    MOLECULAR BIOLOGISTS COMPARED HUMAN AND YEAST FACT

    May 28, 2018

    A protein complex called facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) plays a role in DNA packing within a nucleus, as well as in oncogenesis. A team of scientists from MSU, working in cooperation with foreign colleagues, have reported similarities between the work of this complex in humans and yeast....

    PHYS.ORG
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    LOOKING AT NANOTECHNOLOGY IN BIOTECHNOLOGY

    May 25, 2018

    For some time, the difference between a biotechnology company and a pharmaceutical company was straightforward. A biotechnology focused on developing drugs with a biological basis. Pharmaceutical companies focused on drugs with a chemical basis.It was sort of an artificial distinction, and is even m...

    BIOSPACE
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    NOVARTIS’ AVEXIS TO BUILD GENE THERAPY FACTORY IN DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

    May 24, 2018

    AveXis, a Novartis company based in Illinois, is investing $55 million to build a new manufacturing facility in Durham, North Carolina. The facility will create 200 jobs.AveXis will use the new plant to make its first product candidate, AVXS-101, a gene therapy to treat three types of spinal muscula...

    BIOSPACE
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    TEAM MAKES BREAKTHROUGH IN SYNTHETIC GENOME REARRANGEMENT

    May 24, 2018

    A synthetic biology team at Tianjin University (TJU) has reported new methods and strategies for genome rearrangement and accelerated the evolution of yeast strains with their three latest studies published in Nature Communications on May 22, 2018.The publications are part of an effort toward the ap...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17621762

    BLOOM BAGS CASH, UCLA TECH TO TREAT EPILEPSY VIA THE MICROBIOME

    May 24, 2018

    Bloom Science has raised seed money and licensed technology to treat CNS diseases via the gut-brain axis. Building on research into the ketogenic diet, Bloom is initially focusing on developing bacterial treatments for epilepsy.The ketogenic diet has been used on and off since the 1920s to treat sei...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17651765

    HOW A CELL KNOWS WHEN TO DIVIDE

    May 23, 2018

    How does a cell know when to divide? We know that hundreds of genes contribute to a wave of activity linked to cell division, but to generate that wave new research shows that cells must first grow large enough to produce four key proteins in adequate amounts. The study, published today in Cell Syst...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17581758

    GENETIC DIVERSITY HELPS PROTECT AGAINST DISEASE

    May 23, 2018

    So much for survival of the fittest – diversity is the key: a team of researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) has succeeded in demonstrating experimentally that genetic diversity makes populations more resistant to disease.Why is it that animal a...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17591759

    BIOPHYSICIST WORKS TOWARD BIO-INSPIRED SOLAR CELL

    May 22, 2018

    Even the best human-engineered solar cell is essentially a clunky dial-up modem compared to the sleek high-speed efficiency of the humble leaf. After all, plants have had about a billion years to perfect the process of photosynthesis, which uses energy from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and wate...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17561756

    NIPAH VIRUS, FOUND IN FRUIT BATS, KILLS 10. ITS FLU-LIKE SYMPTOMS OFTEN LEADS TO DEATH

    May 22, 2018

    The Nipah virus has a mortality rate between 40-70% and fatality has been as high as 100% in some outbreaks, according to the World Health Organization. Recent deaths linked to Nipah have been primarily in Kerala and Kozhikode.A nurse, Lini Puthussery, who likely contracted the deadly virus caring f...

    USA TODAY
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17631763

    ALLERGY THERAPEUTICS SHOWS DOSE RESPONSE IN MIDPHASE TRIAL, SETTING STAGE FOR PIVOTAL PROGRAM

    May 21, 2018

    A phase 2 trial of Allergy Therapeutics’ grass pollen candidate met its primary endpoint of showing a dose-response relationship. With the trial also establishing a recommended dose of the short-course subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy, Allergy is set to move into phase 3 next year....

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17541754

    AMGEN, NOVARTIS SET TO LAUNCH MIGRAINE DRUG AIMOVIG NEXT WEEK AFTER FDA APPROVAL

    May 18, 2018

    Amgen and Novartis are set to commercially launch the first calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor inhibitor in the U.S. next week following FDA approval yesterday of the companies’ co-marketed migraine prevention treatment Aimovig™ (erenumab).Aimovig will be the first-and-only ...

    GEN
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    FDA CALLS OUT PHARMA COMPANIES FOR BLOCKING REQUESTS FOR SAMPLES FROM GENERIC MANUFACTURERS

    May 18, 2018

    In order to drive the manufacture of affordable generic drugs, the U.S.Food and Drug Administration is naming names of companies that have attempted to block competition.Building on the momentum of President Donald Trump’s proposals to bring down the cost of prescription drugs, FDA Commissione...

    BIOSPACE
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17511751

    BIOPHARMA, REGULATORS AND RESEARCHERS TURN THEIR FOCUS TO UNIVERSAL FLU VACCINES

    May 17, 2018

    The 2017/2018 influenza season was considered one of the worst, made more so by the ineffectiveness of the season’s flu vaccine. In a late-February statement, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s commissioner Scott Gottlieb, outlined efforts the agency was going to make to impro...

    BIOSPACE
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17421742

    GP-WRITE HAS BIG GOALS FOR SYNTHETIC GENOMES

    May 17, 2018

    We continue to improve our ability to read, write, and edit DNA on larger and larger scales. GP-write wants to gather and coordinate the global enthusiasm around large-scale genome engineering to bring about some major advancements in several areas. Overall, they have the goal to reduce of cost of b...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17461746

    IMMUNE CELL PROVIDES CRADLE FOR MAMMARY STEM CELLS

    May 17, 2018

    A new study finds that one of the toughest characters in the immune system, the macrophage, has a nurturing side, at least when it comes to guarding the developing breast.The study published online this week in the journal Science found that macrophages play an important role in maintaining the mamm...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17471747

    RESISTANT VARIETIES, BENEFICIAL PREDATORS CAN HELP PRODUCERS WIN SUGARCANE APHID BATTLE

    May 16, 2018

    While sugarcane aphids have been difficult to suppress in past years due to their natural traits and limited insecticide options, a Texas A&M AgriLife Research study shows resistant sorghum varieties and beneficial predators could provide a solution.Dr. Ada Szczepaniec, AgriLife Research entomol...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17401740

    ELEVEN BIOTHERAPEUTICS CHANGES NAME TO SESEN BIO TO REFLECT COMMITMENT TO ONCOLOGY THERAPIES

    May 16, 2018

    Eleven Biotherapeutics is rebranding itself as Sesen Bio and investors are pleased. This morning shares of Eleven are up more than 4 percent in premarket trading.This morning Stephen Hurly, president and chief executive officer of the newly dubbed Sesen Bio, said the name change reflects the “...

    BIOSPACE
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17411741

    SCIENTISTS CRACK HOW PRIMORDIAL LIFE ON EARTH MIGHT HAVE REPLICATED ITSELF

    May 15, 2018

    Scientists have created a new type of genetic replication system which demonstrates how the first life on Earth—in the form of RNA—could have replicated itself. The scientists from the Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratory of Molecular Biology say the new RNA utilises a system of gen...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17341734

    BIOLOGISTS FIND MECHANISMS THAT CONTROL WHERE TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS BIND

    May 15, 2018

    A team of biologists has determined how transcription factors (TFs), which guide gene regulation, function differently in embryonic development. The results help illuminate how cells acq"The basic principles learned from these findings are important in understanding how the activities of transc...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17351735

    4 WAYS THE U.S. BIOPHARMA INDUSTRY IS PUSHING BACK ON BIOSIMILARS

    May 11, 2018

    Europe began approving biosimilars in 2006. The U.S. has lagged behind, only starting to approve these copycat drugs in 2015. However, of the nine biosimilars approved in the U.S., only three are actually on the market because of barriers thrown up by the biopharma industry.A biosimilar is essential...

    BIOSPACE
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17251725

    ASTRAZENECA’S FASENRA FAILS IN A COPD CLINICAL TRIAL

    May 11, 2018

    AstraZeneca and its biologics research-and-development arm, MedImmune, indicated that its Fasenra (benralizumab) did not meet its primary endpoint in patients with moderate to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).This was the result of the company’s GALATHEA Phase III clini...

    BIOSPACE
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17291729

    RESEARCHERS DISCOVER HOW CORN BREAKS GENETICS LAWS

    May 11, 2018

    Modern genetics is based on the idea that genes are passed on to progeny in a predictable fashion, as first described by 19th-century Austrian botanist Gregor Mendel. He determined that genes exist in pairs, and each one of the two has an equal chance of being transmitted to the next generation.Howe...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17301730

    GENE THERAPY TO REDUCE RISK OF CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIA

    May 11, 2018

    During recovery from a heart attack, the danger is far from over. In a new study from scientists at the University of Bonn and an international team of collaborators, research findings define a safe way to prevent lethal cardiac arrhythmias from developing.After a heart attack, the heart tissue suff...

    LABROOTS INC
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17311731

    GENENTECH’S TECENTRIQ FLUNKS PHASE III FOR COLORECTAL CANCER

    May 10, 2018

    Genentech, a Roche company, reported that its Phase III IMblaze370 trial of Tecentriq (atezolizumab) and Cotellic (cobimetinib) for difficult-to-treat, locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) did not meet its primary endpoint of overall survival (OS) compared to Bayer’s Stivarga...

    BIOSPACE
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17261726

    RESEARCHER USES 'SHOTGUN SEQUENCING' TO STUDY MICROORGANISMS

    May 09, 2018

    The rice genome. The grape genome. The original human genome project. You name it, Bonnie Hurwitz probably worked on it in her 12 years as a computational biologist in industry, where she combined her loves for genomics and computer programming.Hurwitz, assistant professor of biosystems engineering ...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17191719

    RESEARCH TEAM UNCOVERS MECHANISM OF ACTION FOR A CLASS OF BACTERIAL TOXINS

    May 08, 2018

    Pore-forming toxins are common bacterial poisons. They attack organisms by introducing holes in cell membranes. A team of scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now unraveled the mechanism of action for one of these toxins. The findings could help combat associated diseases and a...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17141714

    GEISINGER HEALTHCARE SYSTEM TEAMS WITH REGENERON TO SEQUENCE PATIENT GENOMES

    May 08, 2018

    Geisinger Health System announced at the HLTH conference in Las Vegas that it plans to expand its population health genomics program from research into clinical practice. It will do so by sequencing patient’s DNA as part of standard care.“We’re going to start doing it the same way ...

    BIOSPACE
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    BIOTECHS DEVELOP TREATMENTS TARGETING MULTIPLE TYPES OF MENTAL ILLNESS

    May 07, 2018

    It is estimated that approximately 25 percent of adults in the United States will deal with some form of mental illness within a given year. It’s also estimated that many of the people who experience these problems may never report it or seek help – despite a number of available therapie...

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    A WAVE OF REGENERATIVE THERAPIES ARE BEING DEVELOPED TO TREAT PATIENT NEEDS

    May 07, 2018

    Artificial body parts have been around for some time. Patients have access to artificial limbs, hearts, eyes, skin and more thanks to the innovation of biomedical engineers. As technology improves, so do the advancements in these man-made devices.But there’s a new trend in personalized medicin...

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    IS YOUR GENOME REALLY YOUR OWN? THE PUBLIC AND FORENSIC VALUE OF DNA

    May 02, 2018

    When Joseph DeAngelo was arrested in the United States last month over a series of 30-year-old murders and assaults, attention quickly focused on how the suspect was found. In their search for the so-called "Golden State Killer", police looked for DNA matches on a public genealogy database...

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    TUNEABLE GENETIC 'CLOCKS' MIGHT LEAD TO IMPROVED BIOTECH STRATEGIES

    May 02, 2018

    Imperial scientists have worked out how to fine-tune cellular clocks, which might lead to optimised production of drugs, biofuels and other chemicals. In genetics, oscillators are biological 'clocks' that express certain key genes at regular time intervals. Such oscillators exist in all real...

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    NEW DETAILS OF MOLECULAR MACHINERY THAT BUILDS PLANT CELL WALL COMPONENTS

    Apr 30, 2018

    Plants are among the most effective energy convertors on Earth. They capture solar energy and convert it to carbon-based compounds that are used for energy and also to build up essential plant components, including the cell walls that surround every single plant cell. In a new biochemical genetics s...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=17071707

    HOW MICROBES LIVING IN THE GUT AFFECT THE BRAIN AND BEHAVIOUR

    Apr 25, 2018

    Researchers at the University of Oxford have proposed an evolutionary framework to understand why microbes living in the gut affect the brain and behaviour, published in Nature Reviews Microbiology. Katerina Johnson (Department of Experimental Psychology) and Kevin Foster (Department of Zoology) ass...

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    BRAIN CELL'S ACHILLES' HEEL MAY PROMPT HYDROCEPHALUS

    Apr 25, 2018

    Viruses may spark hydrocephalus by exploiting a suprising weakness of cells that circulate fluid in the brain, says a new study by Duke University scientists.Cells shaped like sea anemones line the cavities of the brain, rapidly beating their cilia to keep cerebrospinal fluid circulating. These cell...

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    DAIICHI DMD TRIAL MISSES PRIMARY EFFICACY ENDPOINT

    Apr 25, 2018

    An early-phase trial of Daiichi Sankyo’s Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) drug has failed to show clear evidence of efficacy. But, buoyed by safety data and evidence of exon-skipping activity, Daiichi is pushing ahead with further development of the antisense oligonucleotide.Daiichi enrolled ...

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    FUNGUS SENSES GRAVITY USING GENE BORROWED FROM BACTERIA

    Apr 24, 2018

    The pin mold fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus forms a dense forest of vertically growing fruiting bodies, but how does it know which way is "up"? New research publishing 24 April in the open access journal PLOS Biology, from Gregory Jedd's group at the Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory, ...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16971697

    SCIENTISTS GENERATE AN ATLAS OF THE HUMAN GENOME USING STEM CELLS

    Apr 23, 2018

    Scientists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have generated an atlas of the human genome using a state-of-the-art gene editing technology and human embryonic stem cells, illuminating the roles that our genes play in health and disease. The scientists have reported their findings in the journal...

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    FDA STILL NOT HAPPY WITH KAMADA INHALED AAT DRUG

    Apr 23, 2018

    Israeli biotech Kamada has hit another hurdle in its marathon bid to bring the first inhaled treatment for alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency to market as an alternative to intravenous drugs.The company, which specializes in developing drugs from plasma proteins, says the FDA is still not fully sa...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16871687

    A COMPOUND FROM IMMUNE CELLS COULD TREAT PSORIASIS, OTHER AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES

    Apr 20, 2018

    Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis found that itaconate, a compound produced by inflammatory cells, relieved psoriasis-like symptoms in mice. It targets the IL-17 pathway, which plays a key role in autoimmune disease, so while the research centered on psoriasis, it could have broade...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16821682

    BIOGEN PAYS IONIS $1B TO FORM DISCOVERY-STAGE PACT

    Apr 20, 2018

    Biogen is paying $1 billion to enter into a discovery-stage R&D pact with Ionis Pharmaceuticals. The deal gives Biogen a chance to pick up a series of neurological antisense drugs identified by Ionis.Management at Biogen, facing pressure to re-energize the business, has paid a hefty sum to secur...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16831683

    WHY MALE AND FEMALE CELLS BEHAVE DIFFERENTLY AFTER BEING REPROGRAMMED INTO STEM CELLS

    Apr 19, 2018

    Vincent Pasque from KU Leuven, Belgium, and Kathrin Plath from UCLA led an international study into how specialized cells are reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). The researchers discovered that female and male cells behave differently after the reprogramming process and that this i...

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    A COMPLETE CELL ATLAS AND LINEAGE TREE OF THE IMMORTAL FLATWORM

    Apr 19, 2018

    From one stem cell to many differentiated body cells: Scientists from the MDC in Berlin, along with collaborating researchers in Munich, have published a comprehensive lineage tree of a whole adult animal in the journal Science. This was made possible by a combination of RNA and computational techno...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16791679

    CHECKMATE'S I-O COMBO REVERSES PD-1 RESISTANCE IN MELANOMA PATIENTS

    Apr 17, 2018

    Checkmate Pharmaceuticals unveiled phase 1 data at AACR showing its lead asset, CMP-001, in combination with Merck’s Keytruda, reversed PD-1 resistance in advanced melanoma patients who had already failed a prior anti-PD-1 treatment.The trial involved 85 patients whose cancer had progressed on...

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    JOHNSON & JOHNSON SCRAPS PHASE 3 ANTIBIOTIC PROGRAM ACQUIRED IN $30B ACTELION TAKEOVER

    Apr 17, 2018

    Johnson & Johnson has halted development of cadazolid in clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. The antibiotic was one of two experimental assets J&J acquired in its $30 billion takeover of Actelion last year.J&J struck the big-ticket buyout to establish a new business franchise buil...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16741674

    GENOTYPE-FIRST' APPROACH COULD FINE-TUNE DIAGNOSIS OF GENETIC DISORDERS

    Apr 13, 2018

    An international group of scientists started with a genetic mutation and tracked down people who had it, finding 37 individuals with an NAA15 mutation and a multitude of symptoms. Instead of starting with a collection of symptoms and then casting about for their cause, this "genotype-first"...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16681668

    GLAXOSMITHKLINE OFFLOADS RARE DISEASE GENE THERAPIES TO ORCHARD THERAPEUTICS

    Apr 12, 2018

    GlaxoSmithKline is bidding adieu to its stable of gene therapies—it is transferring the assets to Orchard Therapeutics for a 19.9% stake in Orchard and an undisclosed amount in potential milestones and royalties.The portfolio includes the EMA-approved Strimvelis, which treats ADA-SCID, also kn...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16691669

    NEW BIOINFORMATICS TOOL IDENTIFIES AND CLASSIFIES CRISPR-CAS SYSTEMS

    Apr 12, 2018

    Designed to improve the utility and availability of increasingly diverse CRISPR-Cas genome editing systems, the new CRISPRdisco automated pipeline helps researchers identify CRISPR repeats and cas genes in genome assemblies. The freely available software provides standardized, high throughput analyt...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16641664

    RESEARCHERS OPTIMIZE LUNG STEM CELL ENGINEERING PROCESS

    Apr 12, 2018

    The Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) at Boston University and Boston Medical Center has engineered two new categories of lung epithelial cells in vitro using pluripotent stem cells. Published in Stem Cell Reports, CReM researchers detailed their use of single cell RNA sequencing, a state-of-t...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16651665

    RESEARCHERS TRACE BIOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT VIA CRISPER-CAS9-INDUCED SCARRING ON DNA

    Apr 10, 2018

    Technologies such as RNA sequencing are now revealing which genes are expressed in each individual cell. All cells can then be arranged systematically using similar expression profiles. Dr. Jan Philipp Junker, head of the Quantitative Developmental Biology research group at the Max Delbrück Cen...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16601660

    SCIENTISTS LEARN HOW TO AVOID A ROADBLOCK WHEN REPROGRAMMING CELLS

    Apr 10, 2018

    Over a decade ago, Shinya Yamanaka and Kazutoshi Takahashi made a discovery that would revolutionize biomedical research and trigger the field of regenerative medicine. They learned how to reprogram human adult cells into cells that behave like embryonic stem cells. Scientists were shocked that some...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16611661

    WHEAT RESEARCH DISCOVERY YIELDS GENETIC SECRETS THAT COULD SHAPE FUTURE CROPS

    Apr 09, 2018

    A new study has isolated a gene controlling shape and size of spikelets in wheat in a breakthrough which could help breeders deliver yield increases in one of the world's most important crops.The team from the John Innes Centre say the underlying genetic mechanism they have found is also relevan...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16541654

    SCIENTISTS DISCOVER HYBRID SWARM IN GLOBAL MEGA-PEST

    Apr 06, 2018

    CSIRO scientists have confirmed the hybridisation of two of the world's major pest species, into a new and improved mega-pest.One of the pests, the cotton bollworm, is widespread in Africa, Asia and Europe and causes damage to over 100 crops, including corn, cotton, tomato and soybean.The damage...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16531653

    GENES' INTERPLAY GIVES CLUES TO HOW NEW CELL TYPES COULD EVOLVE

    Apr 05, 2018

    Developmental biologists at the University of Bath have gained insights into how a family of essential genes interact differently between different parts of the body and between species, which could offer clues about how new types of cells come to evolve.The researchers from the Department of Biolog...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16511651

    RESEARCHERS ARE USING MACHINE LEARNING TO UNDERSTAND MICROBIAL RELATIONSHIPS

    Apr 03, 2018

    The ecosystem in and around the Amazon River is the most bio-diverse in the world. But it has some competition when considering the roughly thirty feet of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This microbiomethe sum total of microorganisms in a particular environment has been the research focus of ...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16441644

    RESEARCHERS ANALYZE GENOME OF DEADLY, DRUG-RESISTANT PATHOGEN

    Apr 03, 2018

    Infections by microbes like bacteria and fungi that don't respond to available antimicrobial treatments pose an increasingly dangerous public health threat around the world. In the United States alone, such infections kill 23,000 people annually. To better understand the molecular drivers behind...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16451645

    NEW ALGORITHM ENABLES DATA INTEGRATION AT SINGLE-CELL RESOLUTION

    Apr 02, 2018

    A team of computational biologists has developed an algorithm that can 'align' multiple sequencing datasets with single-cell resolution. The new method, published today in the journal Nature Biotechnology, has implications for better understanding how different groups of cells change during ...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16421642

    IMAGING TECHNIQUE REVEALS COMPLEX PROTEIN MOVEMENTS IN CELL MEMBRANE

    Apr 02, 2018

    Every cell in your body is enclosed by a cell membrane, a lipid bilayer that separates the cell's contents from its surroundings. Residing within the cell membrane itself, molecules move around like ballet dancers on a stage.Professor Akihiro Kusumi, leader of the Membrane Cooperativity Unit at ...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16431643

    GENOME ARCHAEOLOGISTS UNCOVER THE ORIGIN OF A PLANT HORMONE

    Mar 29, 2018

    In their quest for the origin of the universal auxin hormone in plants, Wageningen-based biochemists and bioinformaticists took on the mantle of archaeologists. Deep in the evolutionary history of plant life on earth, about a billion years ago, they came across the protein fragments that were alread...

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16361636

    SCIENTISTS DISCOVER FUNCTION OF CAS4 PROTEIN IN CRISPR-CAS DEFENCE SYSTEMS

    Mar 29, 2018

    Researchers around the globe have increasingly been using a bacterial defence mechanism called CRISPR-Cas9 as a tool to surgically edit DNA in living cells. This new technique has made gene editing a lot easier and more precise. But how these systems function in nature is still not fully understood....

    PHYS.ORG
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16371637

    THREAT INTELLIGENCE SHARING ESSENTIAL FOR HEALTHCARE CYBERSECURITY

    Mar 26, 2018

    The National Health Information Sharing and Analysis Center (NH-ISAC) constantly stresses the need for threat intelligence sharing in the healthcare sector, especially as cybersecurity threats grow increasingly sophisticated. Healthcare has been called upon to embark on a fairly rapid mobilization a...

    HEALTHITSECURITY.COM
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16241624

    MICROSCOPY TRIFECTA EXAMINES HOW CELLS ENGULF NUTRIENTS, VIRUSES

    Mar 23, 2018

    Scientists have a better understanding of a mechanism that allows cells to internalize beneficial nutrients and not-so-beneficial viruses, thanks to collaboration among researchers from two South Dakota universities and the National Institutes of Health. South Dakota State University associate profe...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16181618

    INTRACELLULAR TRANSPORT IN 3-D

    Mar 23, 2018

    Cells of higher organisms are densely populated by a tubular network of membranes known as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER-resident complexes serve as a binding platform for ribosomes, the cellular machines responsible for protein synthesis. ER-attached ribosomes synthesize proteins destined for ...

    BIOTECHNOLOGY NEWS
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16191619

    IMPROVING CYBERSECURITY RESPONSE IN HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS

    Mar 20, 2018

    Organizations must have the right staff members in place who are properly trained, and also have appropriate technical tools to ensure that a proper cybersecurity response can occur following a data security incident. Healthcare entities in particular must work to create a comprehensive cybersecurit...

    HEALTHITSECURITY.COM
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16231623

    HOW IS BIOTECH PUTTING A SPRING INTO THE STEP OF SPORTSMEN AND WOMEN AROUND THE WORLD?

    Mar 19, 2018

    For as long as I can remember, I’ve been playing sport at every opportunity that I get. Having studied and worked in biotech, I wanted to find out about the effect that biotech could have on one of my biggest passions. We all want to challenge ourselves and many of us do this by taking up a pa...

    LABIOTECH
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16151615

    RESEARCH SIGNALS ARRIVAL OF A COMPLETE HUMAN GENOME

    Mar 19, 2018

    It's been nearly two decades since a UC Santa Cruz research team announced that they had assembled and posted the first human genome sequence on the internet. Despite the passage of time, enormous gaps remain in our genomic reference map. These gaps span each human centromere. New research from ...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16101610

    A REFERENCE CATALOG FOR THE RUMEN MICROBIOME

    Mar 19, 2018

    The digestive tracts of ruminant (cud-chewing) animals such as cattle, sheep, and goats convert lignocellulosic plant matter to short-chain fatty acids used for nourishment with unparalleled efficiency, thanks to the activity of symbiotic microbes in the rumen. Rumen microbes play a vital role in al...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16111611

    LUNDBECK SIGNS NEAR €1BN ACQUISITION OF SWISS PARKINSON’S BIOTECH

    Mar 16, 2018

    Danish pharma Lundbeck has decided to boost its pipeline with the acquisition of Prexton Therapeutics. The deal grants Lundbeck with global rights to foliglurax, a drug to reduce the “off” time periods when Parkinson’s motor complications come back as levodopa medication stops work...

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    IONIS TAPS MAJORITY-OWNED AKCEA TO LAUNCH INOTERSEN

    Mar 16, 2018

    Six months after losing big pharma partner GlaxoSmithKline plc, Ionis Pharmaceuticals Inc. will tap its majority-owned affiliate Akcea Therapeutics Inc. to commercialize its rare disease drug inotersen, which is currently under review for approval by the Food and Drug Administration. Essentially dea...

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    PRESCRIBED READING: NEURO'S COMEBACK TOUR

    Mar 16, 2018

    It was all about the neuroscience space this week, led by shifting fortunes for the CGRP inhibitor class. While Novartis AG and Amgen Inc., as well as Eli Lilly Co., all await regulatory decisions on their respective CGRP inhibitors, other players in the migraine space were shaking up the landscape....

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    THIS OXFORD SPIN-OUT COULD BE PRINTING NEW BODY PARTS

    Mar 13, 2018

    The Oxford spin-out OxSyBio has secured £10M (€11,26M) to develop a 3D tissue printer that uses liquid droplets to design and regenerate tissues. OxSyBio is developing a technology to 3D print living tissues in order to replace body parts that are damaged by disease or injury. The company...

    LABIOTECH.EU
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=15981598

    ARTIFICIAL AND BIOLOGICAL CELLS WORK TOGETHER AS MINI CHEMICAL FACTORIES

    Mar 13, 2018

    Researchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications. The system, created by a team from Imperial College London, encapsulates biological cells within an artificial cell. Using this, researchers can harn...

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    MOLECULE THAT GIVES ENERGY-BURNING BROWN FAT ITS IDENTITY COULD LEAD TO DRUGS FOR OBESITY

    Mar 13, 2018

    "This not only advances our understanding of how the body responds to cold, but could lead to new ways to control the amount of brown fat in the body, which has links to obesity, diabetes and fatty liver disease," says senior author Ronald Evans, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigato...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=16031603

    A DUTCH COMPANY ON THE QUEST AGAINST CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    Mar 12, 2018

    Daniel de Boer founded ProQR in 2012 following a strong determination to improve the lives of people with cystic fibrosis. “We started ProQR Therapeutics for a very personal reason,” he told me. “Eight years ago, my son was born, and diagnosed with cystic fibrosis. At that time, I ...

    LABIOTECH.EU
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=15941594

    FRENCH BIOTECH TARGETS GUT MICROBIOME TO TREAT DIABETES

    Mar 08, 2018

    Valbiotis, based in Perigny, France, wants to treat type 2 diabetes by restoring the balance of microbial populations in the gut microbiome. New data from a metagenomic sequencing study in mice has shown that its drug, Valedia, increases the diversity of the gut microbiome, which is typically reduce...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=15991599

    SWISS VC CLOSES €86M FUND FOR MEDICAL BIOTECH IN EUROPE

    Mar 06, 2018

    BioMedPartners has raised CHF100M (€86M) that will be invested in medical biotech companies in Switzerland, Germany, and other EU countries. Swiss VC BioMedPartners has managed to gather some big European investors to close its third venture capital fund, called BioMedInvest III and sized at CH...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=15951595

    BIOENGINEERING TEAM'S 'CIRCUIT' WORK MAY BENEFIT GENE THERAPY

    Mar 06, 2018

    Tyler Quarton, a bioengineering graduate student, and Dr. Leonidas Bleris, associate professor of bioengineering in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, said they hope their work, published in Systems Biology and Applications, has a big impact on synthetic biology and gene th...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=15901590

    MAPPING THE GENOME JUNGLE: UNIQUE ANIMAL TRAITS COULD OFFER INSIGHT INTO HUMAN DISEASE

    Mar 06, 2018

    From a bat's wings to an elephant's cancer resistance, an interdisciplinary team of scientists at University of Utah Health are using animals' unique traits to pinpoint regions of the human genome that might affect health. The results of this project are available in the March 6 issue of...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=15911591

    UBER HEALTH AIMS TO GET MORE PATIENTS TO APPOINTMENTS

    Mar 03, 2018

    On March 1, 2018, the ride-hailing company Uber announced the public launch of its Uber Health initiative. This program seeks to supply an easily-accessible system of ride appointments that can be used by patients, doctors and staff in a variety of health care settings. Uber Health is already runnin...

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    IMAGINE YOUR HEAD, IN A PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    Mar 02, 2018

    Any accident in the history of science should serve as a reminder that safety should always remain the most important principle for people who work in the field. Even though some knowledge was obtained from unforeseeable scenarios, it should not be the excuse for any reckless, unsafe practice. Now t...

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    HOW ARE BIOTECHS FIGHTING RARE DISEASES?

    Feb 28, 2018

    Rare diseases affect fewer than 1 in 2,000 people in Europe and less than 200,000 Americans at any given time. A lack of financial incentive has put pharma off but biotechs are keen to step in and develop treatments and cures. Over 6,000 rare diseases affect up to 30 million people in the EU alone, ...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=15821582

    ASTRAZENECA SPINS OUT NEW BIOTECH, SHEDDING AUTOIMMUNE DRUGS

    Feb 28, 2018

    MedImmune, AstraZeneca plc's biologics R&D unit, will spin out six experimental drugs into a standalone biotech, aiming to speed development of assets that fall outside of its core areas of research. Viela Bio will launch with a sizable war chest of $250 million, funded by a group of outside...

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    THIS SMALL MOLECULE PROTECTS THE MUSCLES OF PATIENTS WITH DUCHENNE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    Feb 27, 2018

    Summit Therapeutics’ treatment for the devastating disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, reduces inflammation, which could protect muscle fibers from damage. Summit Therapeutics focuses on the development of treatments that can help patients suffering from diseases that currently lack options....

    LABIOTECH.EU
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=15831583

    MEET THE NEW MEMBER OF CERN'S PARTICLE ACCELERATOR FAMILY

    Feb 27, 2018

    An 86-meter long new linear particle accelerator, Linac4, will be joining CERN’s LHC operation as an injection chain. The 160 MeV accelerator was built 12 meters underground and is more powerful than its predecessor Linac2 at CERN. Scientists started beam tests back in 2013, and its hig...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=15771577

    VENOM COMPOUND EASES ARTHRITIS SYMPTOMS

    Feb 27, 2018

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder affecting over 2 million Americans. Those patients may eventually use a new kind of therapeutic, one made from scorpion venom. A team of investigators led by Dr. Christine Beeton at Baylor College of Medicine has determined that one component out o...

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    THE SECRET TO TRIPLING THE NUMBER OF GRAINS IN SORGHUM AND PERHAPS OTHER STAPLE CROPS

    Feb 26, 2018

    A simple genetic modification can triple the grain number of sorghum, a drought-tolerant plant that is an important source of food, animal feed, and biofuel in many parts of the world. In new research reported today in Nature Communications, scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have fi...

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    STUDY REVEALS KEY INNER CONTROL MECHANISM OF CELL'S 'SMART GLUE'

    Feb 26, 2018

    Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have discovered that a protein critical to a process called liquid-liquid phase separation within the cell undergoes internal changes in conformation that are key to its function. The protein, nucleophosmin, is a kind of "smart glue"...

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    CLUES TO IMMORTALITY FROM THE FRUIT FLY GENOME

    Feb 21, 2018

    The secrets to immortality may lie in an unexpected place - fruit fly stem cells. Researchers led by Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Investigator Yukiko Yamashita have found that some stem cells have a genetic trick to remain young forever across generations. While some areas of the fruit fly...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=15631563

    INSULIN HAS GONE VIRAL

    Feb 20, 2018

    Our bodies need insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas, to control the amount of sugar we have in our blood. When that process fails, the chronic disease diabetes is the result. Diabetics need to monitor the levels of insulin in their bodies and supplement it when there isn't enough. Now, resea...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=15571557

    YOUR PERSONAL HISTORY WITH THE FLU IMPACTS HOW YOU'LL RESPOND TO THE VACCINE

    Feb 20, 2018

    Your Personal History with the Flu Impacts How You'll Respond to the VaccineDon’t dismiss the seasonal flu vaccine just yet. There may be more to its ineffectiveness than meets the scientific eye - and scientists from the University of Chicago Medical Center are prepared to explain why.&nb...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=15581558

    STUDYING MITOSIS' STRUCTURE TO UNDERSTAND THE INSIDE OF CANCER CELLS

    Feb 18, 2018

    Cell division is an intricately choreographed ballet of proteins and molecules that divide the cell. During mitosis, microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs) assemble the spindle fibers that separate the copying chromosomes of DNA. While scientists are familiar with MTOCs' existence and the role t...

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    USING MUTANT BACTERIA TO STUDY HOW CHANGES IN MEMBRANE PROTEINS AFFECT CELL FUNCTIONS

    Feb 18, 2018

    Phospholipids are water insoluble "building blocks" that define the membrane barrier surrounding cells and provide the structural scaffold and environment where membrane proteins reside. During the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, in San Francisco, California, Will...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=15491549

    A NEW ELECTRONIC CIGARETTE FACES OPPOSITION

    Feb 15, 2018

    Cigarettes are bad for you. The science is clear on that, and there have been warnings about the dangers of smoking on packs of cigarettes for decades. From heart disease to high blood pressure and cancer, the list of illnesses and health problems that arise from tobacco use is long. Tobacco company...

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    TREATMENT OF A CHILDHOOD CANCER: AN OVERVIEW

    Feb 15, 2018

    Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive cancer of the bone and soft tissue occurring primarily in adolescents and young adults, although not exclusively. Over the years, doctors treating Ewing sarcoma patients have increased survival rates through the use of intense chemotherapy cocktails and surgical resect...

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    CRISPR-BASED TECHNOLOGY CAN DETECT VIRAL DNA

    Feb 15, 2018

    A powerful genome editing tool can be deployed as an ace DNA detective, able to sniff out DNA snippets that signal viral infections, cancer, or even defective genes. This genetic detective, developed in the laboratory of Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Investigator Jennifer Doudna at the Univ...

    PHYS.ORG
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    RESEARCHERS ADVANCE CRISPR-BASED DIAGNOSTIC TOOL, DEVELOP MINIATURE PAPER TEST

    Feb 15, 2018

    The team that first unveiled the rapid, inexpensive, highly sensitive CRISPR-based diagnostic tool called SHERLOCK has greatly enhanced the tool's power, and has developed a miniature paper test that allows results to be seen with the naked eye without the need for expensive equipment. The SHERL...

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    GENETIC LIMITS THREATEN CHICKPEAS, A GLOBALLY CRITICAL FOODGENETIC LIMITS THREATEN CHICKPEAS, A GLOBALLY CRITICAL FOOD

    Feb 13, 2018

    Perhaps you missed the news that the price of hummus has spiked in Great Britain. The cause, as the New York Times reported on February 8: drought in India, resulting in a poor harvest of chickpeas. Far beyond making dips for pita bread, chickpeas are a legume of life-and-death importance especially...

    PHYS.ORG
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    PLANTS FEEL THE HEAT

    Feb 13, 2018

    It's not just humans and animals that suffer when the mercury rises, plants feel the heat too. Heat stress is a major issue in agriculture and can significantly reduce crop yield. Even small increases in temperature can affect plant growth and development. While plants cannot move to a shady spo...

    PHYS.ORG
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    BIOTECHNOLOGISTS LOOK TO BACTERIA IN EXTREMELY COLD ENVIRONMENTS FOR 'GREEN' DETERGENTS

    Feb 07, 2018

    Despite subzero temperatures, increased UV radiation, little liquid water, and few available nutrients, bacteria living at Earth's poles thrive. They manage it thanks in part to molecules called biosurfactants, which help them separate the complex substrates they feed on into easy-to-metabolize ...

    CELL PRESS
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    SWEET ROUTE TO GREATER YIELDS

    Feb 07, 2018

    Three years ago, biotechnologists demonstrated in field trials that they could increase the productivity of maize by introducing a rice gene into the plant that regulated the accumulation of sucrose in kernels and led to more kernels per maize plant. They have now unravelled the intimate details of ...

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    A GENETIC TRIGGER ADDS BRANCHES TO PLANTS, COULD BOOST CROP YIELDS

    Feb 07, 2018

    When it comes to agriculture from branched plants, such as apple trees, the more branches that bear fruit, the better. But in the real world, there's a limit to the number of branches that plants make a gene tends to put the brakes on this splitting process called shoot branching. Today in ACS C...

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    MATHEMATICS EXPLAINS WHY CRISPR-CAS9 SOMETIMES CUTS THE WRONG DNA

    Feb 07, 2018

    The discovery of the Cas9 protein has simplified gene editing, and may even make it possible to eliminate many hereditary diseases in the near future. Using Cas9, researchers have the ability to cut DNA in a cell to correct mutated genes, or paste new pieces of genetic material into the newly opened...

    PHYS.ORG
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    HOUSE DUST MITES EVOLVED A NEW WAY TO PROTECT THEIR GENOME

    Feb 01, 2018

    House dust mites are common pests with an unusual evolutionary history. They are tiny, free-living animals that evolved from a parasitic ancestor, which in turn evolved from free-living organisms millions of years ago. A new genetic study suggests that, as a consequence of its tumultuous evolutionar...

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    SMALL MOLECULES SET UP SECURITY SYSTEM TO DEFEND THE GENOME

    Feb 01, 2018

    Thousands of short RNA molecules with diverse genetic sequences serve as security guards to identify and silence attempts to invade the genome, such as DNA inserted by viruses or parasitic elements known as transposons. These diverse, small RNA molecules, known as Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are ...

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    COMBINATION OF RESISTANCE GENES OFFERS BETTER PROTECTION FOR WHEAT AGAINST POWDERY MILDEW

    Jan 22, 2018

    University of Zurich plant researchers have tested newly developed wheat lines with improved resistance in field trials. They have demonstrated that a combination of two variations of a resistance gene provides wheat with better protection against the fungal disease. A decent wheat harvest requires ...

    PHYS.ORG
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    HOW PLANTS SEE LIGHT

    Jan 19, 2018

    Plants react sensitively to changes in their surroundings and possess the ability to adapt to them. They use the photoreceptor protein phytochrome B to see light and then regulate processes such as seed germination, seedling development, longitudinal growth and flower formation. A team led by Prof. ...

    PHYS
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    BACTERIAL BIOFILM CELLULOSE FOUND TO DIFFER FROM PLANT CELLULOSE

    Jan 19, 2018

    A team of researchers with members from the U.S., Germany and Sweden has discovered that the cellulose found in bacterial biofilms differs from the cellulose in plants. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they found the difference and what their findings might me...

    PHYS
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    MORE GENES ARE ACTIVE IN HIGH-PERFORMANCE MAIZE

    Jan 19, 2018

    When two maize inbred lines are crossed with each other, an interesting effect occurs: The hybrid offspring have a significantly higher yield than either of the two parent plants. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now investigated a number of genetically distinct hybrids. They showed that th...

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    BREAKTHROUGH ENABLES SCREENING MILLIONS OF HUMAN ANTIBODIES FOR NEW DRUG DISCOVERY

    Jan 17, 2018

    A paper just published in Nature Biotechnology outlines a pioneering method of screening a person's diverse set of antibodies for rapid therapeutic discovery. Antibody proteins are an important part of the human immune system that specifically target foreign viruses and bacteria, and they have b...

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    CLEAN AND GREEN—A MOSS THAT REMOVES LEAD FROM WATER

    Jan 17, 2018

    Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have demonstrated that that moss can be a green alternative for decontaminating polluted water and soil. Published in PLOS ONE, the study shows that in particular, the moss Funaria hygrometrica tolerates and absorbs an ...

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    HORMONE KEYS PLANT GROWTH OR STRESS TOLERANCE, BUT NOT BOTH

    Jan 17, 2018

    Plants that grow well tend to be sensitive to heat and drought, and plants that can handle those stresses often have stunted growth. A Purdue University plant scientist has found the switch that creates that antagonism, opening opportunities to develop plants that exhibit both characteristics. Norma...

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    MERCK KGAA TAPS CRUK, ICR FOR SOURCE OF CANCER CANDIDATES

    Jan 16, 2018

    Merck KGaA has teamed up with Cancer Research UK (CRUK) to access cancer candidates. The pact sets Merck up to work with researchers at CRUK’s unit at The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) on three preclinical oncology projects. Details of the projects are scarce. The scope of the collaborati...

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    PHERECYDES RAISES CASH TO TRIAL ANTI-INFECTIVE PHAGE THERAPIES

    Jan 16, 2018

    Pherecydes has raised money to take bacteriophage-based anti-infectives into clinical trials. The €8.7 million ($10.6 million) series B will support studies targeting two bacterial infections and the creation of a drug manufacturing unit.Paris-based Pherecydes is at the forefront of efforts to ...

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    HEART-ON-A-CHIP' PROCESS AIMS TO SPEED UP DRUG TESTING

    Jan 16, 2018

    Testing new clinical drugs' effect on heart tissue could become quicker and more straightforward, thanks to new research from Harvard University. The study, published today in the journal Biofabrication, sets out a new, faster method for manufacturing a 'heart-on-a-chip', which can be us...

    PHYS
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    NEW STUDY SHOWS PRODUCERS WHERE AND HOW TO GROW CELLULOSIC BIOFUEL CROPS

    Jan 16, 2018

    According to a recent ruling by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, 288 million gallons of cellulosic biofuel must be blended into the U.S. gasoline supply in 2018. Although this figure is down slightly from last year, the industry is still growing at a modest pace. However, until now...

    PHYS
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    STEM CELLS MADE INTO RELAY CELLS FOR SENSE OF TOUCH

    Jan 16, 2018

    For the first time, human sensory interneurons—the cells that communicate the sense of touch in the central nervous system—have been derived from stem cells. In clinical applications, stem cell–derived sensory interneurons could restore feeling in paralyzed patients, potentially co...

    GENENGNEWS
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    BLOOD-VESSEL-ON-A-CHIP SHEDS LIGHT ON ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUG CANDIDATE

    Jan 16, 2018

    Redness, heat, swelling, and pain are the basic characteristics of inflammation described by a Roman physician in the first century. While those characteristics haven’t changed over the millennia, the inflammatory process is generally viewed as a double-edged sword. For instance, the inflammat...

    GENENGNEWS
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    3D BIOSCAFFOLD MIMICS ANTIGEN-PRESENTING CELLS FOR IMPROVED T-CELL EXPANSION

    Jan 16, 2018

    Researchers in the U.S. have developed a 3D biomaterial scaffold that can promote much faster ex vivoexpansion of functional T cells than currently available technologies. The new scaffold is designed to provide the cues that are delivered to T cells by the body’s own antigen-presenting cells ...

    GENENGNEWS
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    NEW DYNAMIC STATISTICAL MODEL FOLLOWS GENE EXPRESSIONS OVER TIME

    Jan 15, 2018

    Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new dynamic statistical model to visualize changing patterns in networks, including gene expression during developmental periods of the brain. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the model now gives researchers ...

    PHYS
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    FAST-TRACKING T CELL THERAPIES WITH IMMUNE-MIMICKING BIOMATERIALS

    Jan 15, 2018

    Immunologists and oncologists are harnessing the body's immune system to fight cancers and other diseases with adoptive cell transfer techniques. In a normal immune response, a type of white blood cell known as T cells are instructed by another kind of immune cell called an antigen-presenting ce...

    PHYS
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    HOW CLIMATE CHANGE ALTERS PLANT GROWTH

    Jan 15, 2018

    Global warming affects more than just plant biodiversity—it even alters the way plants grow. A team of researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) joined forces with the Leibniz Institute for Plant Biochemistry (IPB) to discover which molecular processes are involved in plan...

    PHYS
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    CHARLES RIVER BUYS IMMUNOLOGY PLAYER KWS BIOTEST FOR $20M

    Jan 15, 2018

    Charles River Laboratories has snapped up British CRO KWS BioTest for £15 million ($20 million), enhancing its offerings in immuno-oncology and inflammatory and infectious diseases.KWS specializes in offering in vitro and in vivo testing services in the larger area of immunology, including tar...

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    RESEARCH SCIENTISTS DISCOVER NEW PRODUCTION PATHWAY FOR PLANT SOS SIGNALS

    Jan 12, 2018

    When harmful insects attack a plant, it defends itself. It forms protective substances that are poisonous for the insects. This defense response is activated by messengers, jasmonates. Their biosynthesis had been deemed to have been elucidated for almost two decades. But now plant physiologists from...

    PHYS
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    NORTHERN CORN LEAF BLIGHT GENES IDENTIFIED IN NEW STUDY

    Jan 12, 2018

    Midwestern corn growers know the symptoms of northern corn leaf blight all too well: greenish-gray lesions on the leaves that can add up to major yield losses if not detected and treated early. Resistance genes have been identified in corn, but the fungal disease has found ways to sneak around corn&...

    PHYS
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    ALL IN THE FAMILY: FOCUSED GENOMIC COMPARISONS

    Jan 12, 2018

    Found in microbial communities around the world, Aspergillus fungi are pathogens, decomposers, and important sources of biotechnologically-important enzymes. Each Aspergillus species is known to contain more than 250 carbohydrate active enzymes (CAzymes), which break down plant cell walls and are of...

    PHYS
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    BIOLOGISTS CREATE TOOLKIT FOR TUNING GENETIC CIRCUITS

    Jan 11, 2018

    Rice University scientists have created a toolkit for synthetic biologists who need to precisely tune the input and output levels of genetic circuits. The research, which is online in Nature Communications, is a boon for life scientists who systematically engineer bacteria and other organisms to per...

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    SCIENTISTS IDENTIFY THE LINK BETWEEN LIGHT AND CHLOROPLAST DEVELOPMENT

    Jan 11, 2018

    It has long been assumed that light activates chloroplastic gene expression via so-called thiol-mediated redox regulation. However, the mechanism giving rise to this regulation has remained elusive until now. Åsa Strand and her group at the Umeå Plant Science Centre have now identified t...

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    BIOLEGEND LICENSES TRANSCRIPTOME TECH FROM NY GENOME CENTER

    Jan 11, 2018

    A technology developed at the New York Genome Center that combines protein and messenger RNA expression measurements in cells has been licensed by biotech tools company BioLegend.The San Diego-based company has taken an exclusive license to the CITE-Seq platform developed by NYGC scientist Marlon St...

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    ZAFGEN TRIES AGAIN WITH OBESITY, RARE DISEASE DRUGS AFTER SETBACK

    Jan 08, 2018

    Clinical-stage biotech Zafgen, Inc. is looking again at rare diseases, selecting ZGN-1258 for the treatment of rare or orphan metabolic diseases, including Prader-Willi syndrome, sending its shares up around 8% on Friday. Work to support an investigational new drug application is under way, with a P...

    BIOPHARMADIVE
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    NEW PAPER COULD PUT CRISPR BIOTECHS UNDER PRESSURE

    Jan 07, 2018

    A new journal paper published late last week revealed that a “cutting” element of the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technique could be under threat from the body’s own immune system. The paper, published on bioRxiv (but as yet to be peer-reviewed), saw researchers undertake blood tests ...

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    GUT MICROBIOME ASSEMBLAGE IMPACTS RESPONSE TO CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY

    Jan 05, 2018

    University of Chicago Medicine researchers report that specific microbiome assemblages can boost the response rate to immunotherapy for patients being treated for advanced melanoma. Their study (”The Commensal Microbiome Is Associated with Anti–PD-1 Efficacy in Metastatic Melanoma Patien...

    GENENGNEWS
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    ALCOHOL BOOSTS CANCER RISK BY DAMAGING STEM CELL DNA

    Jan 04, 2018

    Alcohol consumption is known to raise the risk of certain cancers, but exactly how alcohol causes cells to stagger toward malignant fates is often unclear. To find ways of keeping cells on the straight and narrow, scientists based at MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, used mice to show ...

    GENENGNEWS
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    STRENGTHENING CITRIC FRUIT TO BETTER RESIST CLIMATE CHANGE

    Jan 04, 2018

    Research of the Department of Agricultural Sciences and the Natural World of the Universitat Jaume I in Castellón, Spain, has identified the genes within citric fruit that biotechnology could improve to fight climate change. Work spearheaded by professor Vicent Arbona is progressing in the un...

    PHYS
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    SCIENTISTS UNCOVER A GENETIC MECHANISM THAT COULD ENHANCE YIELD POTENTIAL IN CEREAL CROPS

    Jan 04, 2018

    Solving the world's food, feed and bioenergy challenges requires integration of multiple approaches and diverse skills. Andrea Eveland, Ph.D., assistant member at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, and her team identified a genetic mechanism that controls developmental traits related to g...

    PHYS
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    JAPANESE RESEARCHERS PROPOSE NEW DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA AND TREATMENT GUIDELINES FOR THYROID STORM

    Jan 02, 2018

    With a mortality rate estimated at 10%, the life-threatening condition known as thyroid storm (TS) demands rapid diagnosis and treatment and can benefit from new evidence-based guidelines for TS developed by researchers in Japan. The article entitled "Thyroid Storm: A Japanese Perspective"...

    NEWS-MEDICAL.NET
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    MICROBEADS ALLOW ULTRASONIC WAVES TO STIMULATE CELLS MORE SAFELY

    Jan 02, 2018

    Researchers at Duke University have discovered a way to enhance the effectiveness and safety of sonogenetics or ultrasonic modulation, emerging techniques that use sound waves to control the behavior of individual neurons or to promote tissue growth and wound healing in other cells. Ultrasonic thera...

    PHYS
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    PIONEERING NEW TECHNOLOGY SET TO ACCELERATE THE GLOBAL QUEST FOR CROP IMPROVEMENT

    Jan 01, 2018

    Speed breeding technique sows seeds of new green revolution. Pioneering new technology is set to accelerate the global quest for crop improvement in a development which echoes the Green Revolution of the post war period. The speed breeding platform developed by teams at the John Innes Centre, Univer...

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    A PHOSPHOLIPID PATHWAY FROM PLANTS TO PARASITES

    Dec 29, 2017

    Recent findings by researchers at Washington University in St. Louis may aid in the development of therapies to treat parasitic infections, including malaria, and may help plant scientists one day produce hardier crops. The research team's work is published in the Dec. 29 issue of the Journal of...

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    A NEW REGULATOR OF VESICLE TRAFFICKING IN PLANTS

    Dec 28, 2017

    A protein that transports the simple chemical choline plays a major role in vesicle trafficking, ion homeostasis, and growth and development in plants, according to two new studies publishing 28 December in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by Dai-Yin Chao of the Shanghai Institutes for Biologic...

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    ENGINEERS HACK CELL BIOLOGY TO CREATE 3-D SHAPES FROM LIVING TISSUE

    Dec 28, 2017

    Many of the complex folded shapes that form mammalian tissues can be recreated with very simple instructions, UC San Francisco bioengineers report December 28 in the journal Developmental Cell. By patterning mechanically active mouse or human cells to thin layers of extracellular matrix fibers, the ...

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    LOCAL ELECTRICAL RESPONSES IN LEAVES MAKE PHOTOSYNTHESIS HEAT-TOLERANT

    Dec 28, 2017

    Plants exist in variable and often unfavorable environmental conditions, which requires the functioning of a variety of adaptive mechanisms for their survival under the action of stressors. The study of such adaptive mechanisms and identifying ways to control them opens up broad prospects for saving...

    PHYS
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    A CAR-T APPROACH TO ATTACKING HIV

    Dec 28, 2017

    Engineered immune cells known as chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-T) have grabbed headlines this year for their potential to cure some patients with leukemia and lymphoma. But CAR-T is generating plenty of interest beyond cancer, and scientists at the University of California at Los Angeles ar...

    FIERCEBIOTECH
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    NEW GELLING APPROACH DEVELOPED FOR 3D BIOPRINTING COMPLEX STRUCTURES

    Dec 28, 2017

    Scientists at the University of Osaka in Japan have developed a new technology that should make it possible to bioprint highly complex biological structures using a greater variety of cells. Although inkjet bioprinting isn’t a new concept, there are currently limited methods for gelling the bi...

    GEN
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    SELF-FERTILIZING FISH HAVE SURPRISING AMOUNT OF GENETIC DIVERSITY

    Dec 26, 2017

    As weird animals go, the mangrove killifish is in a class of its own. It flourishes in both freshwater and water with twice as much salt as the ocean. It can live up to two months on land, breathing through its skin, before returning to the water with a series of spectacular 180-degree flips. And it...

    PHYS
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    SCIENTISTS IDENTIFY HIDDEN GENETIC VARIATION THAT HELPS DRIVE EVOLUTION

    Dec 26, 2017

    Identifying complex mutations in the structure of an organism's genome has been difficult. But in a new study published online in Nature Genetics, a research team led by J.J. Emerson, assistant professor of ecology & evolutionary biology at the Ayala School of Biological Sciences, applies ne...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=14461446

    TWO PROTEINS MAINTAIN EMBRYONIC STEM CELL PLURIPOTENCY THROUGH DIFFERENT MEANS

    Dec 22, 2017

    Two 'finger-like' proteins employ different mechanisms to help safeguard the ability of embryonic stem cells to differentiate into a variety of cell types, according to an A*STAR-led study. This finding could help researchers develop new ways to regenerate lost or damaged tissue. PRDMs are a...

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    SCIENTISTS HAVE ISOLATED THE VERY FIRST RUST PATHOGEN GENE THAT WHEAT PLANTS DETECT TO 'SWITCH ON' RESISTANCE

    Dec 21, 2017

    Famine may be largely a thing of the past but in recent years the re-emergence of a disease that can kill wheat - which provides a fifth of humanity's food - has threatened food security; now a breakthrough is being announced just before Christmas, in two companion papers being published in the ...

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    GENETIC RESEARCH BREAKTHROUGH TO BOOST BARLEY PRODUCTION

    Dec 21, 2017

    Grain growers are celebrating a recent breakthrough by Murdoch University researchers that will lead to a boost in future barley production. Professor Chengdao Li, Director of Murdoch's Western Barley Genetics Alliance, said the exciting development would see new lines of barley bred without blu...

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    PLANTS CAN CHOOSE BETWEEN ALTERNATIVE RESPONSES TO COMPETITION

    Dec 21, 2017

    Biologists from the University of Tübingen have demonstrated that plants can choose between alternative competitive responses according to the stature and densities of their opponents. A new study by researchers from the Institute of Evolution and Ecology reveals that plants can evaluate the co...

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    BIOETHICIST DISCUSSES FOUR KEYS TO KNOW ABOUT POSSIBILITIES, PITFALLS OF GENE EDITING

    Dec 21, 2017

    Gene editing has captivated scientists and medical providers with tantalizing visions of wiping out debilitating inherited diseases. Could conditions like Huntington's disease, for example, be cured by using a tool that acts as a "molecular scissors" to remove and replace disease-causi...

    PHYS
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    /news-article.aspx?ID=14341434

    NEW MECHANISM FOR CISPLATIN-ASSOCIATED HEARING LOSS UNCOVERED

    Dec 21, 2017

    Side effects from chemotherapy can range from the mildly acute, such as nausea, to severe chronic disorders, like hearing loss. Understanding and potentially mitigating side effects are of paramount concern for clinicians, drug manufacturers, and patients alike. With that in mind, a team of investig...

    GENENGNEWS
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    EISAI AND BIOGEN’S ALZHEIMER’S DRUG FLUNKS EARLY ADAPTIVE TRIAL READOUT

    Dec 21, 2017

    Eisai and Biogen’s hopes of an early positive readout for anti-amyloid beta drug BAN2401 in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have been dashed, but they’re not giving up on the program yet. The adaptive phase 2 trial in patients with mild or prodromal AD included a 12-month data readout tha...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=14411441

    WHEN ONE REFERENCE GENOME IS NOT ENOUGH

    Dec 20, 2017

    Much of the research in the field of plant functional genomics to date has relied on approaches based on single reference genomes. But by itself, a single reference genome does not capture the full genetic variability of a species. A pan-genome, the non-redundant union of all the sets of genes found...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=14211421

    GENETIC MODIFICATION AND GENOME EDITING RELY ON ACTIVE ROLES FOR RESEARCHERS AND INDUSTRY

    Dec 20, 2017

    How society regards the use of genetic modification and genome editing can have a significant influence on how these technologies are regulated by authorities and on the pace of technological advancement. In a review published in the Journal of Dairy Science authors from the Swedish University of Ag...

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    LIFE IN MARINE DRIFTWOOD: THE CASE OF DRIFTWOOD SPECIALIST TALITRIDS

    Dec 20, 2017

    Driftwood in the sea - either floating or stranded on beaches - is a common feature particularly in temperate regions. Large quantities of driftwood, termed driftwood depositories, may collect at the mouth of small streams associated with marshes and have been present for some 120 millennia - since ...

    PHYS
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    PLANT DEFENSE FOLLOWING THE IRON-MAIDEN PRINCIPLE

    Dec 20, 2017

    Calcium phosphate is a typical component of teeth and bones. It has recently been shown that plants of the rock nettle family also use this very hard mineral in their "teeth" to defend themselves against their animal enemies. Botanists of Bonn University have now demonstrated that calcium ...

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    MOBILE GENETIC ELEMENTS THAT ALTER THE FUNCTION OF NEARBY GENES

    Dec 20, 2017

    Raúl Castanera-Andrés, an engineer in the Agri-Food Engineering and Rural Environment Department of the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre, has worked on detecting mobile genetic elements (transposons) in basidiomycete fungi, a type of well-known fungi because they produce edible mu...

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    /news-article.aspx?ID=14251425

    MICE HELP FIND GENE FOR BAD BREATH

    Dec 19, 2017

    An international team of researchers has identified a cause for chronic bad breath (halitosis), with the help of gene knockout mice from the UC Davis Mouse Biology Program. The results are published Dec. 18 in the journal Nature Genetics. While most cases of bad breath are linked bacteria growing in...

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    A FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS DATABASE FOR PLANT MICROBIOME STUDIES

    Dec 19, 2017

    As the global population rises, estimated to hit nearly 10 billion by 2050, so does the need to boost crop yields and produce enough plant material for both food and sustainable alternative fuels. To help improve crop breeding strategies and overcome challenges such as making plants more tolerant of...

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    VIRUS STAMPING—A VERSATILE NEW METHOD FOR GENETIC ENGINEERING OF SINGLE CELLS

    Dec 19, 2017

    Research groups led by Botond Roska at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI) and Daniel Müller at the ETH Zurich Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering (D BSSE) have developed a novel method that allows them to efficiently deliver genes into single cells in wh..