. home.aspx

NEWS

home.aspx
   


Key Gene in the Transmission of Deadly African Sleeping Sickness

April 11, 2019 / technology networks

Life scientists from UCLA and the University of Bern have identified a key gene in the transmission of African sleeping sickness -- a severe disease transmitted by the bite of infected tsetse flies, which are common in sub-Saharan Africa. The disease is fatal if untreated, as the parasite responsible moves from the bloodstream to the central nervous system. Tens of millions of people in 36 African countries are at risk. There is no vaccine, and conventional drug treatments, which include an arsenic derivative, are antiquated, not very effective and have severe side effects. The research, published in the journal Nature Communications, could lead to new approaches to treat the disease. It also provides scientists with the first detailed understanding of how the parasite moves through the fly and what genes enable it to do so. The tiny, single-celled parasite that causes African sleeping sickness in humans, and debilitating diseases in other mammals, is called Trypanosoma brucei, or T. b...