Made-To-Order Human Kidneys Closer To Reality After Experimental Breakthrough

Studyfinds | July 04, 2019

The idea of lab-grown organs being used to save human lives sounded more like science fiction than reality just a few decades ago, but new research out of Japan suggests man-made organs may be a viable option for patients in need in the not so distant future. Researchers from the National Institute for Physiological Sciences in Okazaki, Japan successfully grew functional mouse kidneys inside rats using only a few donor stem cells, potentially paving the way for humans to one day benefit from lab-grown kidneys. All of this is especially relevant to end-stage renal disease patients in need of kidney transplants. Many renal patients never receive the kidney transplant they need due to a worldwide shortage of donor kidneys. For example, in just the United States alone there are currently 95,000 people waiting for a donor kidney. For this experiment, researchers used a method that has already shown promising results in the past, called blastocyst complementation. During this process, scientists take the clusters of cells formed shortly after fertilization, that will eventually develop into a fetus, from deformed animals that are missing certain organs. These cell clusters are then injected with stem cells from a healthy donor. The healthy donor doesn’t have to necessarily be from the same species, just as in this case mouse stem cells were used on rats.

Spotlight

Hemophilia, anemia and blood cancer diseases such as leukemia are some diseases that could receive new, curative treatments if the secret of the blood stem cells is revealed.

Spotlight

Hemophilia, anemia and blood cancer diseases such as leukemia are some diseases that could receive new, curative treatments if the secret of the blood stem cells is revealed.

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Novozymes and Saipem enter collaboration agreement to create a more sustainable CO2 capture

Novozymes | December 13, 2021

Novozymes, the world leader in biological solutions, and Saipem, an advanced technological and engineering platform for safe and sustainable complex infrastructure and plants, have signed a collaboration agreement for the development of innovative solutions for enzymatic carbon capture. As part of the agreement, Saipem - which owns an enzyme-based CO2 capture technology - will be responsible for providing process, mechanical and equipment design, while Novozymes will provide enzymes while further optimizing the process through enzymes innovation. Enzymatic carbon capture is more sustainable in environmental terms and more cost-effective compared to traditional CO2 capture processes. In fact, it is based on the use of enzymes that require the input of heat at lower temperatures and a significantly moderate use of chemicals, energy and, consequently, cuts down the production of harmful waste. Furthermore, this process is more reliable, as the carbonates and enzymes, being low corrosion materials, minimize the deterioration of equipment. Saipem and Novozymes are mutually satisfied with the signed agreement which constitutes an important step towards realizing innovative solutions for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. In fact, thanks to Saipem's expertise in CO2 capture and storage technologies and Novozymes' cutting-edge enzymes solutions, the two companies can make the enzymatic carbon capture process highly competitive on the market of traditional amine processes. “This collaboration is an important step towards more sustainable solutions for lowering greenhouse gas emissions. Enzymatic carbon capture has the potential to replace resource-heavy processes with energy-efficient, biological processes, providing both environmental and financial benefits while accelerating the battle against climate change,” Amy Byrick, Executive Vice President of Strategy & Business Transformation at Novozymes About Novozymes Novozymes is the world leader in biological solutions. Together with customers, partners, and the global community, we improve industrial performance while preserving the planet's resources and helping build better lives. As the world's largest provider of enzyme and microbial technologies, our bioinnovation enables higher agricultural yields, low-temperature washing, energy-efficient production, renewable fuel, and many other benefits that we rely on today and in the future.

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MEDICAL

Stramsen Biotech, Inc. to Fund Next Phases of Clinical Trials and Additional Medicine Discovery Research

Stramsen Biotech, Inc | December 17, 2020

Stramsen Biotech, Inc, a professional group of medication researchers from the Houston, Texas territory comprises of scientists who devote their lives each day to investigating and exploring both the cycles and logical instruments hidden the world we live in today. Colleagues have gotten a few honors and awards for research ventures, with a significant number of their activities and distributions accessible upon demand. Individuals incorporate PhD and University level professors who specialize in chemistry, medication and different biotechnology research projects. This group of experienced researchers has been included widely in clinical examination for more than 20 years. Stramsen Biotech, Inc has more than six drug/medicine candidates currently in early-stage clinical trials. Two drug/medicine candidates have demonstrated promising outcomes in early clinical preliminaries for treatment of HIV/AIDS. A third drug applicant has additionally demonstrated promising outcomes in early clinical preliminaries for treatment of numerous kinds of wounds and cuts, including diabetic injuries. A fourth medication applicant shows promising outcomes in early clinical preliminaries for treating the basic Flu and Covid-19. The fifth outstanding medication competitor, focusing on ongoing and advance stage malignant growths, has additionally indicated promising outcomes in early clinical preliminaries. Finally, a 6th applicant as an immunization shows promising clinical preliminary outcomes for Newcastle disease, a infection of domestic poultry and other winged creature species with the virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV).

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MEDICAL

Suono Bio, Inc. Announces Formulation-Agnostic Platform for the Delivery of RNA Therapeutics

Suono Bio | January 06, 2022

Suono Bio, Inc., the company revolutionizing the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases, announced its latest publication in the Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences demonstrating the capability to deliver unformulated RNA therapeutics against relevant disease targets in the gastrointestinal tract. This latest publication adds to the validation of Suono Bio’s therapeutic delivery platform leveraging low-frequency ultrasound for formulation-agnostic delivery. This technology was originally developed in the laboratory of Institute Professor Robert Langer at MIT to facilitate rapid, local administration of therapeutics to treat serious diseases. “Therapeutic translation of oligos has been hampered by delivery and bioavailability issues with a complicated landscape for chemical-based formulations. This further demonstrates our capability to deliver RNAs and siRNAs to knockdown relevant gene targets without the need for any formulation.” Dr. Carl Schoellhammer, corresponding author, and Suono Bio co-founder In addition to previously demonstrating the preclinical use of siRNAs for treating inflammatory conditions, this latest publication demonstrates the ability to knockdown endogenous genes, including Ctnnb1, the gene encoding for beta-catenin, which plays a role in tumorigenesis in colorectal cancers, for example. ABOUT SUONO BIO Suono Bio was founded by Robert Langer and Giovanni Traverso, a gastroenterologist and biomedical engineer from the Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Dr. Carl Schoellhammer. The company is developing therapeutic products for inflammatory-mediated diseases leveraging their ultra-rapid and formulation independent delivery technology. Suono Bio’s platform enables rapid, localized delivery of small molecules, biologics, and nucleic acids and gene therapies without the need for encapsulation of the therapeutic.

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