Genetically modified food opponents know less than they think, research finds

Phys.org | January 14, 2019

The people who hold the most extreme views opposing genetically modified (GM) foods think they know most about GM food science but actually know the least, according to new research. The paper, published Monday in Nature Human Behaviour, was a collaboration between researchers at the Leeds School of Business at the University of Colorado Boulder, Washington University in St. Louis, the University of Toronto and the University of Pennsylvania.
Marketing and psychology researchers asked more than 2,000 U.S. and European adults for their opinions about GM foods. The surveys asked respondents how well they thought they understood genetically modified foods, then tested how much they actually knew with a battery of true-false questions on general science and genetics. Despite a scientific consensus that GM foods are safe for human consumption and have the potential to provide significant nutritional benefits, many people oppose their use. More than 90 percent of study respondents reported some level of opposition to GM foods.

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Clinicians generally cite medication nonadherence as the primary reason patients don’t achieve treatment goals or optimal outcomes or gain control of their chronic conditions. This assertion is supported by the following data. It’s also widely recognized that about half of the medicines prescribed to patients are not taken as directed.

Spotlight

Clinicians generally cite medication nonadherence as the primary reason patients don’t achieve treatment goals or optimal outcomes or gain control of their chronic conditions. This assertion is supported by the following data. It’s also widely recognized that about half of the medicines prescribed to patients are not taken as directed.

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DIAGNOSTICS

Provectus Algae Expands into New Large-Scale Microalgae Biomanufacturing Facility

Provectus Algae | August 28, 2021

Provectus Algae, an Australian biotechnology platform company specialising in the biomanufacturing of high-value compounds for a wide array of industries using microalgae, announced they will be expanding into an additional large-scale manufacturing facility. “Since closing our seed round last year, we have been in full swing growing the team, developing products and building capacity with our proprietary production system. We are now in a strong position as we push into this next phase of the company's growth” Located in Noosaville, Australia, the new site is expected to be operational by the end of 2021 and will complement the company’s existing facility to deliver new algae-made products to the market. The new facility will support the production of a high-performance food colouring which is currently in late stage of development. Once completed, the facility will have a 200,000 litre production capacity and expanded R&D operations to support early-stage product development and partnerships for the Food & Beverage sector. Provectus’s inaugural pilot facility will subsequently be converted to support the commercial production of a separate high-value product that is currently undergoing product testing. The company expects further expansion in the near term with plans for a supplementary 1 million litre facility already underway to support the commercialisation of multiple products already in the company development pipeline. Provectus has engaged global food & beverage companies to craft a tailored development pipeline of products most relevant to the strengths of the company’s biomanufacturing platform. The flexibility of the company’s unique platform approach is evidenced by the speed at which lead products have moved through the development pipeline to commercial readiness. “This is just the tip of the iceberg for Provectus Algae. The stage of development we are now at with our production platform gives us a clear line of sight to deliver some really exciting products to the food and beverage marketplace,” said Nusqe Spanton, Founder and CEO of Provectus Algae. “What we are able to achieve for our commercial partners is simply not comparable to any other offering in the marketplace. Thanks to algae, we are able to benefit from a 3.5-billion-year head start in producing some of the world’s most coveted ingredients.” The Provectus platform addresses supply chain challenges by providing end-to-end services from product development to large-scale biomanufacturing. Importantly, the manufacturing platform is able to go from bench to industrial-scale seamlessly with a continuity of their novel production technology. “Since closing our seed round last year, we have been in full swing growing the team, developing products and building capacity with our proprietary production system. We are now in a strong position as we push into this next phase of the company's growth,” Spanton added. ABOUT PROVECTUS ALGAE Provectus Algae is an Australian biotech company that programs algae to produce the world's most valuable specialty ingredients. By accelerating nature, their team is able to optimise unique microalgae to produce a whole new range of natural products, in a process described as “precision photosynthesis”. Using next-generation techniques the company has also developed a synthetic biology stack that complements and competes with existing production platforms to deliver high-performance and sustainable products.

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Lesaffre and Recombia Biosciences Announces Strategic Partnership to Advance Innovative Gene Editing Technology

Recombia Biosciences | November 02, 2020

Recombia Biosciences announces the launch of operations in Brisbane, California. The company aims to harness its proprietary genome editing technologies to accelerate the development of yeast for sustainable production of fermented ingredients. For the next few years Recombia and Lesaffre will be joining forces in the area of yeast strain development. With its partnership with Recombia, Lesaffre is investing in major pioneering technology. The ability to generate thousands of yeast strains in parallel, combined with laboratory automation, is expected to exponentially accelerate development of projects in the areas of health, the environment, and energy. The partnership also signifies Lesaffre's entry into the world of Synthetic Biology, considered to be the major biotechnological opportunity of this decade. Recombia Biosciences was founded by three Stanford University researchers in 2019 as a spin-off from the prestigious Stanford Genome Technology Center (SGTC). Recombia's technologies are based upon techniques that increase the efficiency of genome editing and enable engineering of yeast at very high throughput. The strategic collaboration with Lesaffre aims to advance Recombia's proprietary gene editing technologies to identify new yeast strains, discover novel yeast physiology of industrial relevance and optimize the production of biosourced ingredients and biofuels.

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MEDICAL

Felix Biotechnology Announces Initiation of CYPHY Phase 1/2 study at Yale for Lead Asset

Felix Biotechnology | January 08, 2021

Felix Biotechnology reported the inception of CYPHY, a Phase 1/2 examiner started single focus preliminary at Yale University for focused phage treatment YPT-01 in the therapy of constant P. aeruginosa diseases in cystic fibrosis. This twofold visually impaired, fake treatment controlled study (NCT 04684641) will evaluate the wellbeing and adequacy of YPT-01 added to standard antimicrobial treatment in 36 patients. CYPHY will likewise evaluate the capacity of YPT-01 to lessen the harmfulness and anti-infection obstruction of P. aeruginosa, improving patient results and re-empowering utilization of conventional anti-infection agents against multi-drug safe strains. The lead specialist for this investigation, Dr. Jon Koff, Associate Professor and Director of Yale's Adult Cystic Fibrosis Program, is supported by an academic grant from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. "This is a fantastic opportunity to show how effective phage therapy can be when deployed in an evolutionary framework. We know that pathogens evolve resistance to any antibiotic or therapy we use, so our approach turns that to our advantage," said Dr. Paul Turner, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, co-inventor of YPT-01, and co-founder of Felix Biotechnology. "By targeting phage to mechanisms of virulence, we ensure that if pathogens evolve resistance to phage, they lose traits that make them effective pathogens, putting them in an evolutionary Catch-22."

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