Correct antibiotic dosing could preserve lung microbial diversity in cystic fibrosis

Medical Xpress | February 22, 2019

Children and young adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) whose lung infections were treated with suboptimal doses of antibiotics had fewer changes in lung microbial diversity during the IV treatment, and their microbial diversity levels were higher 30 days later, a multi-institutional study that includes Children's researchers shows. By contrast, patients who were treated with therapeutic doses had greater decreases in lung microbial diversity and significantly lower diversity levels when the antibiotic treatment ended as well as 30 days later. "With the subtherapeutic treatment group, this could represent a 'basement effect' where it is harder to decrease diversity when it is already low to start. Also, patients in the subtherapeutic group had more advanced disease than those in the therapeutic group, which may influence the findings," explains Andrea Hahn, M.D., MS, an infectious disease specialist at Children's National Health System and the study's lead author. The findings, published online Feb. 22, 2019, in Scientific Reports, clearly establish the importance of the interplay between baseline microbial diversity and lung function and have the potential to improve clinical practices, the research team writes.

Spotlight

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of regulatory biomolecules with roles in diverse processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenesis [1]. In recent years, technological advances in research tools including qPCR, microarrays, and nextgeneration sequencing (NGS) have enabled sensitive detection of miRNAs. However, accurate quantifi cation of miRNAs using qPCR is largely dependent on proper normalization techniques, the absence of which can lead to misinterpretation of data and incorrect conclusions [1]. The goal of most miRNA experiments using qPCR is to identify differences in expression between two groups of samples, typically a normal (control) and a mutated (test) sample group. The purpose of normalization is to remove any differences between these two groups other than that which is a true representation of expression levels of the miRNAs in the mutated state.

Spotlight

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of regulatory biomolecules with roles in diverse processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenesis [1]. In recent years, technological advances in research tools including qPCR, microarrays, and nextgeneration sequencing (NGS) have enabled sensitive detection of miRNAs. However, accurate quantifi cation of miRNAs using qPCR is largely dependent on proper normalization techniques, the absence of which can lead to misinterpretation of data and incorrect conclusions [1]. The goal of most miRNA experiments using qPCR is to identify differences in expression between two groups of samples, typically a normal (control) and a mutated (test) sample group. The purpose of normalization is to remove any differences between these two groups other than that which is a true representation of expression levels of the miRNAs in the mutated state.

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Intravacc's candidate RSV vaccine demonstrates safety in phase I trial

Intravacc | August 18, 2020

Intravacc, a global leader in translational research and development of viral and bacterial vaccines, today announced the publication in the medical journal Vaccine, of a clinical phase I study with its candidate Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) vaccine. The vaccine showed excellent induction of immunogenicity after nasal administration to healthy adult volunteers (18-50 years). In addition, the Live Attenuated Vaccine (LAV), constructed with reverse genetics, appears to be safe and well-tolerated. Intravacc is currently orienting on a suitable partner for further joint clinical development of this vaccine in a large pediatric setting.A pediatric vaccine against RSV would not only prevent morbidity and mortality in infants and young children but could also reduce transmission to the elderly. The RS virus is the most common cold virus in children under the age of five and poses a serious threat to the elderly as well. Many biotech and pharmaceutical companies have been developing an RSV vaccine since the 1960s, but to this day no vaccine emerged out of this. An estimated 120,000 children worldwide still die of the virus every year, especially in developing countries.

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MEDICAL

GenScript Launches GMP Single-Strand and Double-Strand DNA Service for Supporting Gene and Cell Therapy Development

GenScript | May 18, 2022

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CELL AND GENE THERAPY

Bio-Techne Signs License Agreement with Luminary Therapeutics for the Use of TcBuster™ for the Manufacturing of Gene-modified Cell Therapies

Bio-Techne | February 25, 2021

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