Always Disorganized? That Might Actually Be A Good Thing

goodnewsnetwork | April 21, 2019

Always Disorganized? That Might Actually Be A Good Thing
There’s never been a better time to be disorganized. For those of who you have been criticized for being messy, we have some good news. According to Steven Johnson, “the more disorganized your brain is, the smarter you are.” He is the author of Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation. In his book, he notes that this revelation was discovered in a neuroscience experiment conducted by bio-psychologist Robert Thatcher. In addition, Johnson and other sources have cited “messy” ideas as proving to have a profound impact on creativity. For instance, research has revealed “wandering minds” to be more creative—and even large cities as being more creative than smaller towns due to the amount of spurring ideas. “Being right keeps you in place,” says this author of seven books focused around science, technology and life. “Being wrong forces us to explore.”

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This video is about Biotechnology

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This video is about Biotechnology

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