A Cure for Cancer? How CAR T-Cell Therapy is Revolutionizing Oncology

Labiotech.eu | September 10, 2019

A Cure for Cancer? How CAR T-Cell Therapy is Revolutionizing Oncology
CAR-T therapy has been hailed as a cure for cancer, but what really is this ‘miraculous technology’ and what can we actually expect from it? The field of immuno-oncology is booming with billions of euros in investment. The ability to rewire our own immune system to fight cancer has certainly created huge expectations. After the success of the first checkpoint inhibitor drugs on the market, many are turning their attention to CAR-T cell therapy. There are two CAR-T therapies already on the market. The field is now booming, with over 800 CAR-T clinical trials running. But is this therapy really a cure for cancer, as many seem to believe? Can the technology meet such high expectations? Are side effects a concern? Is it worth the huge price tag? To answer the most burning questions, I talked with some of the leaders in this field to draw an overview of the current state of CAR-T technology.

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Live cell imaging allows scientists to view the inner workings of cells in unprecedented detail, but keeping cells alive throughout the imaging process poses unique challenges not present for other imaging techniques.This illustrated infographic presents tips for preparing cells for live cell imaging and gives an overview of the live cell imaging market today. Learn how to optimize each step of the sample prep process to make sure you get the clearest picture possible.

Spotlight

Live cell imaging allows scientists to view the inner workings of cells in unprecedented detail, but keeping cells alive throughout the imaging process poses unique challenges not present for other imaging techniques.This illustrated infographic presents tips for preparing cells for live cell imaging and gives an overview of the live cell imaging market today. Learn how to optimize each step of the sample prep process to make sure you get the clearest picture possible.

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Pfizer to Acquire Trillium Therapeutics Inc.

Pfizer Inc | August 24, 2021

Pfizer Inc. and Trillium Therapeutics Inc. today announced that the companies have entered into a definitive agreement under which Pfizer will acquire Trillium, a clinical stage immuno-oncology company developing innovative therapies for the treatment of cancer. Under the terms of the agreement, Pfizer will acquire all outstanding shares of Trillium not already owned by Pfizer for an implied equity value of $2.26 billion, or $18.50 per share, in cash. This represents a 118% premium to the 60-day weighted average price for Trillium. Trillium’s portfolio includes biologics that are designed to enhance the ability of patients’ innate immune system to detect and destroy cancer cells. Its two lead molecules, TTI-622 and TTI-621, block the signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα)–CD47 axis, which is emerging as a key immune checkpoint in hematological malignancies. 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Our deep experience in understanding the science of blood cancers, along with the diverse knowledge base we have developed across our growing hematology portfolio of eight approved and investigational therapies, provide us with a foundation to advance these important potential medicines to patients who need them.” Hematological malignancies are cancers that affect the blood, bone marrow, and lymph nodes. This classification includes various types of leukemia, multiple myeloma, and lymphoma. More than 1 million people worldwide were diagnosed with a blood cancer in 2020, representing almost 6% of all cancer diagnoses globally. In 2020, more than 700,000 people worldwide died from a form of blood cancer. “We’re delighted to announce Pfizer’s proposed acquisition of Trillium. Today’s announcement reflects Trillium’s potentially best in class SIRPα–CD47 status and contribution to immuno-oncology,” said Dr. Jan Skvarka, Chief Executive Officer of Trillium. “Trillium has the only known SIRPα–CD47 targeting molecules with clinically meaningful monotherapy responses as well as a strong basis for combination therapies, which is supported by preclinical evidence with a diverse set of therapeutic agents. With Pfizer’s global reach and deep capabilities, we believe our programs will advance more quickly to the patients we’ve always aspired to serve. We believe this is a good outcome for patients and our shareholders.” In clinical studies to-date, TTI-622 and TTI-621 have demonstrated activity as monotherapy in relapsed or refractory lymphoid malignancies, including Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), Follicular Lymphoma (FL), and other lymphoid malignancies. As of July 26, 2021, Phase 1 data for TTI-622 in 30 response-evaluable patients have shown deep and durable responses in heavily pretreated patients, including two complete responses (CRs), one lasting over 114 weeks, with responses ongoing. TTI-622 and TTI-621 are currently the only known CD47-targeted molecules that have demonstrated meaningful single agent activity and CRs in multiple hematological malignancies. Thus far, adverse events (AEs) reported with TTI-622 and TTI-621 have been manageable. Related Grade 3 and 4 AEs with TTI-622 were rare and limited to transient cytopenias. In particular, the molecules demonstrate minimal red blood cell binding and few reported cases of anemia, an observed risk with other CD47-targeted approaches. Further data are expected to be shared at a forthcoming medical conference. “We are encouraged by the early clinical data for TTI-622 and TTI-621 monotherapy for patients with heavily pretreated lymphoid malignancies and early encouraging activity for TTI-622 in patients with multiple myeloma. Just as PD-1 and PD-L1 blockers have proven to be effective immuno-therapeutics for many solid tumors, the SIRPα-CD47 interaction defines a second key immune checkpoint for which disrupting agents are expected to become another important backbone immunotherapy for multiple types of cancer, especially hematological cancers,” said Chris Boshoff, MD, PhD, Chief Development Officer, Oncology, Pfizer Global Product Development. “Utilizing Pfizer’s leading research and global development capabilities, we plan to accelerate the clinical development of SIRPα fusion proteins as a potential new scientific breakthrough and explore combinations within our own portfolio and with innovative next-generation medicines for hematological malignancies.” In September 2020, as part of the Pfizer Breakthrough Growth Initiative (PBGI), Pfizer invested $25 million in Trillium and Jeff Settleman, Senior Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer of Pfizer’s Oncology Research & Development Group, was named to Trillium’s Scientific Advisory Board. Established in June 2020, PBGI’s goal is to provide funding for scientific research as well as access to Pfizer’s experts to ensure the continuity of clinical programs that could be of potential strategic interest for Pfizer. Pfizer has committed to providing up to $500 million in total funding to the PBGI. Additional Transaction Details The proposed acquisition of Trillium is to be completed by way of a statutory plan of arrangement under the Business Corporations Act (British Columbia) and subject to customary closing conditions, including approval of 66⅔% of the votes cast by Trillium shareholders, voting together as one class, at a special meeting of Trillium and approval of 66⅔% of the votes cast by Trillium shareholders and warrant holders, voting together as one class, at a special meeting of Trillium. Completion of the acquisition is also subject to court and regulatory approval, as well as certain other closing conditions customary for transactions of this nature. Pfizer’s financial advisors for the transaction are BofA Securities, Inc., with Ropes & Gray LLP and Norton Rose Fulbright Canada LLP acting as its legal advisors. Centerview Partners LLC served as Trillium’s financial advisor, while Goodwin Procter LLP and Baker McKenzie LLP (Canada) served as its legal advisors. About SIRPα/CD47 Accumulating data suggest that the SIRPα–CD47 axis is a key immune checkpoint in hematologic malignancies, similar to the PD-L1 / PD-1 checkpoint for solid tumors. CD47 is a protein that is overexpressed in numerous cancer cells, and in general, high CD47 expression correlates with more aggressive disease and poorer clinical outcomes. SIRPα is an inhibitory receptor expressed on myeloid cells that binds to CD47, preventing the immune system from destroying cancer cells. Disruption of the CD47-SIRPα interaction has been proven to elicit tumor destruction through triggering of an innate immune response. About Pfizer Oncology At Pfizer Oncology, we are committed to advancing medicines wherever we believe we can make a meaningful difference in the lives of people living with cancer. Today, we have an industry-leading portfolio of 24 approved innovative cancer medicines and biosimilars across more than 30 indications, including breast, genitourinary, colorectal, blood and lung cancers, as well as melanoma. About Pfizer: At Pfizer, we apply science and our global resources to bring therapies to people that extend and significantly improve their lives. We strive to set the standard for quality, safety and value in the discovery, development and manufacture of health care products, including innovative medicines and vaccines. Every day, Pfizer colleagues work across developed and emerging markets to advance wellness, prevention, treatments and cures that challenge the most feared diseases of our time. Consistent with our responsibility as one of the world's premier innovative biopharmaceutical companies, we collaborate with health care providers, governments and local communities to support and expand access to reliable, affordable health care around the world. For more than 170 years, we have worked to make a difference for all who rely on us. About Trillium Therapeutics Trillium is an immuno-oncology company developing innovative therapies for the treatment of cancer. The company’s two clinical programs, TTI-622 and TTI-621, target CD47, a “don’t eat me” signal that cancer cells frequently use to evade the immune system.

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