Brexit: Biotech awaits impact of slow shuffle to EU exit

NICK PAUL TAYLOR | December 22, 2016

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It is now six months since Britain voted to leave the European Union. In that time, a new government has set up two new departments, set out a tweaked economic strategy and fielded a near-constant stream of questions about Brexit. And yet biotech, like all other industries and the British public, is no closer to knowing what life will look like post-Brexit than it was on June 24. Biotech executives woke the morning after the referendum with questions about how Brexit would affect everything from flows of capital, their ability to hire from overseas and the regulations—and regulatory agency—governing their work. These remain some of the key unanswered questions. And they are also the areas in which drugmakers at home and abroad are pressuring the government for favorable outcomes.

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