Artificial Cells Are Tiny Bacteria Fighters

| September 3, 2018

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“Lego block” artificial cells that can kill bacteria have been created by researchers at the University of California, Davis Department of Biomedical Engineering. The work is reported Aug. 29 in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.“We engineered artificial cells from the bottom-up like Lego blocks to destroy bacteria,” said Assistant Professor Cheemeng Tan, who led the work. The cells are built from liposomes, or bubbles with a cell-like lipid membrane, and purified cellular components including proteins, DNA, and metabolites.

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Bio Basic Inc.

Bio Basic Inc. is a privately owned dynamic biotechnology company founded in Toronto, Canada. Since its inception, Bio Basic has developed rapidly by manufacturing various Life Science Products and has served as a one-stop-stop for researchers in the life sciences.

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