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Weight loss: WEIGHT LOSS: 'TELLING SOMEONE TO IMPROVE THEIR DIET DOESN'T WORK'

blog article

Mar 22, 2019

Doctors often advise people who are overweight to lose weight by improving their dietary habits or becoming more physically active. However, the results of a new study suggest that such generic advice does not empower people to succeed in their weigh...

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How sugary drinks can fuel and accelerate cancer growth HOW SUGARY DRINKS CAN FUEL AND ACCELERATE CANCER GROWTH

blog article

Mar 22, 2019

Is there a direct link between the added sugars in soft drinks and the growth of cancer tumors? The findings of a new study may settle this question. Researchers acknowledge that obesity increases the risk of cancer, and some studies even consid...

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High-Fructose Corn Syrup Promotes Tumor Growth In Mice HIGH-FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP PROMOTES TUMOR GROWTH IN MICE

blog article

Mar 22, 2019

Consuming the equivalent of one can of soda per day caused mice predisposed to colon cancer to develop larger tumors, according to a study by Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian investigators. The study, published March 22 in the jou...

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Blue Brain Solves A Century-Old Neuroscience Problem BLUE BRAIN SOLVES A CENTURY-OLD NEUROSCIENCE PROBLEM

blog article

Mar 22, 2019

For nearly 100 years, scientists have been trying to name cells. They have been describing them in the same way that Darwin described animals and trees. Now the Blue Brain Project has developed a mathematical algorithm to objectively classify the sha...

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Genome catalog bolsters global microbiome research GENOME CATALOG BOLSTERS GLOBAL MICROBIOME RESEARCH

blog article

Mar 22, 2019

The largest-yet attempt to characterize the global diversity of the human microbiome the population of microbes that live in our bodies have found 4,930 species, 77 percent of which were previously unknown. Nearly half of all children with autism hav...

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The Future of Antibody Discovery THE FUTURE OF ANTIBODY DISCOVERY

video

Mar 20, 2019

Quickly discover, analyze, and engineer therapeutic antibodies with our antibody library screening platform. High-throughput monoclonal antibody library screening has never been faster, and developability properties have never been better, thanks to ...

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Particle robots PARTICLE ROBOTS

video

Mar 20, 2019

Researchers from MIT, Columbia University, and elsewhere have developed computationally simple robots that connect in large groups to move around, transport objects, and complete other tasks. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is an indep...

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Carrot: Curbing Smoking Addiction in America CARROT: CURBING SMOKING ADDICTION IN AMERICA

video

Mar 20, 2019

If we could develop innovative technology such as a personal sensor to track the amount of carbon monoxide in a smoker's lungs, then this and other types of interventions could help change the behaviors around smoking and potentially save 500,000...

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Why narcolepsy is an autoimmune condition WHY NARCOLEPSY IS AN AUTOIMMUNE CONDITION

blog article

Mar 20, 2019

Previous research has suggested that narcolepsy may be an autoimmune condition. Now, a new paper published in the journal Nature Communications finds additional evidence that this may be the case. Narcolepsy is a chronic neurological condition that a...

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Scientists Revealed How Probiotics Influence Human Gut Bacteria SCIENTISTS REVEALED HOW PROBIOTICS INFLUENCE HUMAN GUT BACTERIA

blog article

Mar 20, 2019

A group of researchers from ITMO University and Knomics company studied how gut microbiota of 150 volunteers changed after a month of regular consumption of yogurt fortified with probiotics. The study showed that such a diet increases the proportion ...

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KingFisher Ready DNA Ultra 2.0 prefilled plates KINGFISHER READY DNA ULTRA 2.0 PREFILLED PLATES

video

Mar 19, 2019

KingFisher Ready DNA Ultra 2.0 prefilled plates are ready-to-use reagents using MagMAX technology, which means fewer pipetting steps and faster, more consistent extractions. Simply peel off the cover, add sample, and load plate onto a KingFisher.

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CBD for cancer: Everything you need to know CBD FOR CANCER: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW

blog article

Mar 19, 2019

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is one of many cannabinoids in the cannabis plant gaining popularity in the world of natural medicine because it appears to offer the body many benefits. While there is some debate around the topic, some people suggest using CBD ...

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What are the health benefits of dark chocolate? WHAT ARE THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF DARK CHOCOLATE?

blog article

Mar 19, 2019

Dark chocolate is rich in minerals, such as iron, magnesium, and zinc. The cocoa in dark chocolate also contains antioxidants called flavonoids, which may provide several health benefits. Chocolate comes from cacao, which is a plant with high levels ...

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Genomics Is Driving New Opportunities in Genetic Disease Research GENOMICS IS DRIVING NEW OPPORTUNITIES IN GENETIC DISEASE RESEARCH

blog article

Mar 19, 2019

Even among scientists, there is some blurring and some overlap in the usage of the words "genetics" and "genomics." In this article that looks at a slice of the interaction between these two disciplines, a distinction must be made...

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Epigenetic protein could be new therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia EPIGENETIC PROTEIN COULD BE NEW THERAPEUTIC TARGET IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

blog article

Mar 19, 2019

British researchers have discovered that an epigenetic protein called EZH2 delays the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but then switches sides once the disease is established to help maintain tumor growth. The study suggests that targeting...

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From Mirror-image Biology to Enhanced Therapeutic Proteins FROM MIRROR-IMAGE BIOLOGY TO ENHANCED THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS

blog article

Mar 19, 2019

Almost all biological molecules exist as two different spatial structures that are related to each other like image and mirror image. These molecules are referred to as enantiomers. Much like one's right and left hands, they cannot be superimpose...

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The Search for a Better Biofuel: Can Biotech Deliver? THE SEARCH FOR A BETTER BIOFUEL: CAN BIOTECH DELIVER?

blog article

Mar 19, 2019

With dire climate change reports landing one after another in 2018 the need for sustainable, scalable, and affordable biofuels to aid in this transition to a more sustainable future has never been greater. Ticking all three boxes is no easy task, but...

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Response to Skin Fungi Pivotal in Dermatitis Pathway RESPONSE TO SKIN FUNGI PIVOTAL IN DERMATITIS PATHWAY

blog article

Mar 19, 2019

How does the immune system respond to fungi on our skin? Researchers at the University of Zurich have demonstrated that the same immune cells that protect us against skin fungi also encourage the inflammatory symptoms of atopic dermatitis. An antibod...

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Machine Learning Tracks Moving Cells MACHINE LEARNING TRACKS MOVING CELLS

blog article

Mar 19, 2019

Both developing babies and elderly adults share a common characteristic: the many cells making up their bodies are always on the move. As we humans commute to work, cells migrate through the body to get their jobs done. Biologists have long struggled...

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Cells Remember Gene Repression CELLS REMEMBER GENE REPRESSION

blog article

Mar 19, 2019

Epigenetic memory of transcriptional gene silencing has been observed in several organisms. However, it was not known whether mechanisms exist that convey transgenerational memory of a silencing “experience”, without silencing the gene pe...

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"Swinging" Genes Maintain Skeletal Muscle Stem Cell Numbers "SWINGING" GENES MAINTAIN SKELETAL MUSCLE STEM CELL NUMBERS

blog article

Mar 18, 2019

Periodic fluctuations in gene expression, which was previously only known to occur in neural stem cells, has been identified in muscle stem cells. This oscillation is thought to be crucial in helping maintain muscle stem cell numbers. When a muscle g...

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A DNA Switch for Whole-body Regeneration A DNA SWITCH FOR WHOLE-BODY REGENERATION

blog article

Mar 18, 2019

When it comes to regeneration, some animals are capable of amazing feats - if you cut the leg off a salamander, it will grow back. When threatened, some geckos drop their tails as a distraction and regrow them later. Other animals take the process ev...

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Most Teens Report Using Marijuana Less Often After Legalization MOST TEENS REPORT USING MARIJUANA LESS OFTEN AFTER LEGALIZATION

blog article

Mar 18, 2019

Only one group of teenagers used marijuana more often after retail sales were legalized in Washington than they did before high school seniors who work 11 or more hours per week, according to new research led by a WSU College of Nursing professor. Ma...

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Ticagrelor reversal agent provides immediate and sustained relief TICAGRELOR REVERSAL AGENT PROVIDES IMMEDIATE AND SUSTAINED RELIEF

blog article

Mar 18, 2019

In patients with acute coronary syndromes, coronary artery stenting, or a history of prior heart attacks, antiplatelet therapy can be lifesaving. Ticagrelor, in combination with aspirin, is commonly prescribed for patients to help prevent blood clott...

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Second Patient Has Been Cured of HIV SECOND PATIENT HAS BEEN CURED OF HIV

video

Mar 17, 2019

A person with HIV seems to be free of the virus after receiving a stem-cell transplant that replaced their white blood cells with HIV-resistant versions. The patient is only the second person ever reported to have been cleared of the virus using this...

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Breast cancer: Does stress fuel its spread? BREAST CANCER: DOES STRESS FUEL ITS SPREAD?

blog article

Mar 16, 2019

New research in mouse models shows that stress hormones can help breast cancer grow, spread, and diversify, which makes it harder to treat.  Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer. In the United States, there were about 266,120 ...

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Biosensor may provide better cancer diagnosis BIOSENSOR MAY PROVIDE BETTER CANCER DIAGNOSIS

blog article

Mar 15, 2019

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have developed a new biological sensor that could help clinicians better diagnose cancer and epilepsy. Biological sensors monitor small molecules, ions,  and protons and are vital as a me...

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“Mastermind” Scientists Help Diagnose Rare Diseases “MASTERMIND” SCIENTISTS HELP DIAGNOSE RARE DISEASES

blog article

Mar 15, 2019

Rare diseases are problematic for clinicians and scientists as it is extremely challenging to study their etiology. It’s therefore a sad reality that many patients suffering from rare conditions often do not receive a diagnosis, making their ca...

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Cell Growth Performance In Single-Use Bags CELL GROWTH PERFORMANCE IN SINGLE-USE BAGS

whitepaper

Mar 15, 2019

Achieving consistent cell growth is critically important to the biotech industry. To optimize the final drug product output the current industry trends are towards higher cell densities and protein titers. With the uptake of single-use bags in cell c...

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Battling the Superbugs: The Future of Fighting Infections BATTLING THE SUPERBUGS: THE FUTURE OF FIGHTING INFECTIONS

video

Mar 15, 2019

In the race to keep up with harmful bacteria as they continually evolve to outsmart our antibiotics, we have fallen woefully behind. There are already superbugs we cannot defeat. And at the current pace, the Age of Antibiotics will end in our lifetim...

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Exploring Sleep and Genetics on World Sleep Day 2019 EXPLORING SLEEP AND GENETICS ON WORLD SLEEP DAY 2019

blog article

Mar 15, 2019

March 15, 2019, marks World Sleep Day, an annual event organized by the World Sleep Society to celebrate sleep and to emphasize the importance of issues related to sleep, including medicine, education, social aspects and driving. Today, we explore th...

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Broken Heart Syndrome: Can You Die of a Broken Heart? BROKEN HEART SYNDROME: CAN YOU DIE OF A BROKEN HEART?

video

Mar 15, 2019

Broken heart syndrome, also called stress-induced cardiomyopathy or takotsubo cardiomyopathy, can strike even if you're healthy. (Tako tsubo, by the way, is octopus traps that resemble the pot-like shape of the stricken heart.)

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93 percent of medications contain 93 PERCENT OF MEDICATIONS CONTAIN 'POTENTIAL ALLERGENS'

blog article

Mar 15, 2019

According to a recent study, many of the medicine ingredients that people consider to be inactive may, in fact, cause health problems for some consumers. Alongside the active components in medicines, there is almost always a list of other ingredients...

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USP15 enzyme could have role in the future treatment of cancer USP15 ENZYME COULD HAVE ROLE IN THE FUTURE TREATMENT OF CANCER

blog article

Mar 15, 2019

Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Center found that the enzyme USP15 could potentially lead to new treatments for breast and pancreatic cancer. “With this study, we validate the role of USP15 in maintaining genome stab...

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Tiny Protein Has Huge Potential in CRISPR TINY PROTEIN HAS HUGE POTENTIAL IN CRISPR

blog article

Mar 14, 2019

An array of CRISPR proteins now exist, each presenting with their own unique properties. Last year the smallest CRISPR protein, Cas14 was discovered. This CRISPR protein’s tiny size means that it is hyper-specific in the delivery of gene editin...

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Tierra Biosciences is Moving Biological Manufacturing to The Mainstream TIERRA BIOSCIENCES IS MOVING BIOLOGICAL MANUFACTURING TO THE MAINSTREAM

blog article

Mar 14, 2019

With the continual demand for new therapeutics, the team at Tierra Biosciences (formerly Synvitrobio) is on a mission to derive natural products such as antibiotics from microbes. In a recent webinar, we spoke with Tierra CEO Zachary Sun to find out ...

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Machine-learning model to analyse protein sequences MACHINE-LEARNING MODEL TO ANALYSE PROTEIN SEQUENCES

blog article

Mar 14, 2019

Researchers have demonstrated how machine learning can analyze sequences of proteins providing a wealth of information on the structure of proteins, their function, and their evolutionary features. Sequences of molecules, called amino acids, make up ...

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How the Biotech Industry is Making Flavors Healthier and Eco-Friendly HOW THE BIOTECH INDUSTRY IS MAKING FLAVORS HEALTHIER AND ECO-FRIENDLY

blog article

Mar 13, 2019

The food industry is under pressure to create products that don’t just taste great, but that is also good for our health and for the environment. Biotechnology is emerging as a solution to enjoy the flavors we love without damaging our bodies o...

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How can advances in computerized decision support systems best be used to improve antimicrobial stewardship? HOW CAN ADVANCES IN COMPUTERIZED DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS BEST BE USED TO IMPROVE ANTIMICROBIAL STEWARDSHIP?

blog article

Mar 13, 2019

Antimicrobial stewardship programs aim to ensure the responsible use of antibiotics, balancing the needs of the patient against the impact of broad-spectrum antibiotic use leading to antimicrobial resistance. Recently published research in Antimicrob...

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BMC Molecular and Cell Biology: one journal, one community, any organism BMC MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY: ONE JOURNAL, ONE COMMUNITY, ANY ORGANISM

blog article

Mar 13, 2019

BMC Cell Biology has been recently relaunched as BMC Molecular and Cell Biology, with a revamped journal and scope. Here, Managing Editor Maria Hodges and Editor Alison Cuff tell us more about this exciting addition to the BMC series portfolio of jou...

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Acoustic Liquid Handling Enables 40x Reduction in Volume for DNA Assemblies ACOUSTIC LIQUID HANDLING ENABLES 40X REDUCTION IN VOLUME FOR DNA ASSEMBLIES

blog article

Mar 13, 2019

Miniaturization throughout a workflow is a key part of lowering costs and speeding up the synthesis of DNA constructs. Here, we'll take a closer look at this process and see how using the NEB NEBuilder® HiFI DNA Assembly Cloning Kit and the L...

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The Bugs That Lay Eggs In Your Face THE BUGS THAT LAY EGGS IN YOUR FACE

video

Mar 13, 2019

Face mites live on pretty much all adult humans. Including you. These tiny arachnids suck oil and cell material from your pores and lay eggs in your hair follicles. But don't worry, they’re usually harmless. Infestations only seem to be a p...

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Fantastically Attainable with Synthetic Biology FANTASTICALLY ATTAINABLE WITH SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY

video

Mar 13, 2019

Clear your path to what's attainable with Synthetic Biology. Pursue the next 'wow' thing with Invitrogen's Geneart gene synthesis, genome editing, and custom oligos. Explore the possibilities with Thermo Fisher.

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Type 2 diabetes: Work stress may raise risk in women TYPE 2 DIABETES: WORK STRESS MAY RAISE RISK IN WOMEN

blog article

Mar 13, 2019

A new review featuring in the European Journal of Endocrinology suggests that a stressful work environment may increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in women. More than 100 million people in the United States have diabetes or prediabet...

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HOW TUMOR CELLS ESCAPE T CELLS HOW TUMOR CELLS ESCAPE T CELLS

blog article

Mar 12, 2019

Immunogenic tumor cells often display protein antigens at their surface, which can be recognized by T cells and serve as a signal for T cells to attack the tumor. However, one long-standing paradox is that tumor-specific T cells often co-exist with t...

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Primal Pictures: 3D Functional Anatomy PRIMAL PICTURES: 3D FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY

infographic

Mar 12, 2019

Discover the human body as you’ve never seen it before, with dynamic movement animations and movies of the entire body from every angle, plus explanatory text to reinforce knowledge and understanding.

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Why Babies Can WHY BABIES CAN'T EAT HONEY

video

Mar 12, 2019

Babies less than one-year-old can get seriously sick from eating honey. Honey contains C. botulinum bacteria, which can produce a toxin in a baby’s large intestine, leading to a rare but serious illness known as “infant botulism.” F...

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New brain stimulation therapy is effective against depression NEW BRAIN STIMULATION THERAPY IS EFFECTIVE AGAINST DEPRESSION

blog article

Mar 12, 2019

A new clinical trial has tested the ability of a little-studied, noninvasive brain stimulation technique to treat the symptoms of major depression. The results, so far, have been more than promising. Researchers from the University of North Caro...

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How preventable is sepsis-related death? HOW PREVENTABLE IS SEPSIS-RELATED DEATH?

blog article

Mar 12, 2019

How prevalent and preventable is death from sepsis? A new study, recently published in the journal JAMA Network Open, investigates. Sepsis is a potentially fatal condition that develops from the body's overactive response to an infection. Accordi...

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IBD: New approach to symptom relief looks promising IBD: NEW APPROACH TO SYMPTOM RELIEF LOOKS PROMISING

blog article

Mar 12, 2019

Treatments that target inflammation directly don't work for many people with inflammatory bowel disease. Now, new research suggests that blocking a protein involved in blood clotting could be a promising alternative. After studying genetic d...

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A Genetic Basis for Insomnia Emerges from the Twilight A GENETIC BASIS FOR INSOMNIA EMERGES FROM THE TWILIGHT

blog article

Mar 12, 2019

Around a third of people complain of some sleeplessness, and one in 10 meets diagnostic criteria for clinical insomnia. The costs, in terms of well-being, physical health, and productivity, are enormous. From twin studies, researchers know the inabil...

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New type of twin born from one egg and two sperm NEW TYPE OF TWIN BORN FROM ONE EGG AND TWO SPERM

video

Mar 12, 2019

Sesquizygotic multiple pregnancies is an exceptional intermediate between monozygotic and dizygotic twinning. We report a monochorionic twin pregnancy with fetal sex discordance. Genotyping of amniotic fluid from each sac showed that the twins were m...

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Gut microbiome patterns associated with post-surgery complication risk GUT MICROBIOME PATTERNS ASSOCIATED WITH POST-SURGERY COMPLICATION RISK

blog article

Mar 12, 2019

As we learn more about the microbiome through next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, the more we become aware of the extent of its impact on us. Research published in BMC Microbiology now finds an association between differences in patients&r...

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Danish Biotech to Develop CRISPR-Based Microbiome Treatments DANISH BIOTECH TO DEVELOP CRISPR-BASED MICROBIOME TREATMENTS

blog article

Mar 11, 2019

SNIPR Biome has raised €43M in Series A funds to develop treatments that precisely target ‘bad’ bacteria using CRISPR gene editing while keeping the rest of the patient’s microbiome intact. Founded with €2.6M seed investme...

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A Multi-Omics Database for Tomato Research and Breeding A MULTI-OMICS DATABASE FOR TOMATO RESEARCH AND BREEDING

blog article

Mar 11, 2019

Ace. Beefsteak. Big Boy. Kumato. Early Girl. Roma. Sun Gold. San Marzano. These are just a few of the thousands of varieties of tomato plants available today. And while all of these varieties may be very different with respect to crop yield, disease ...

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Spotlight on e-health and m-health SPOTLIGHT ON E-HEALTH AND M-HEALTH

blog article

Mar 11, 2019

eHealth – including digital technologies for health, health analytics, telehealth, and mobile health (mHealth) – has gone through a period of significant growth and maturity in recent years. Recently, I was pleased to edit a new Special I...

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Are All Our Organs Vital? ARE ALL OUR ORGANS VITAL?

blog article

Mar 11, 2019

Medicine has not always shown a lot of respect for the human body. Just think about the ghoulish disregard early surgeons had for our corporeal integrity. They poked holes in the skull and copiously drained blood with leeches or lancets a practice th...

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Flow Cytometry Modernizes Apoptosis Assays FLOW CYTOMETRY MODERNIZES APOPTOSIS ASSAYS

blog article

Mar 11, 2019

Apoptosis is a dynamic, multi-step, programmed cell death process. Improved understanding offers the promise of preventing cell death when inappropriate (such as in neurodegenerative disease), and triggering it when the body is invaded by rogue cance...

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Automated Microfluidic Systems for Gene Editing AUTOMATED MICROFLUIDIC SYSTEMS FOR GENE EDITING

blog article

Mar 11, 2019

Technologies such as CRISPR are being utilized on a daily basis in an ever-growing number of research laboratories across the world, and it seems that the anticipated introduction of gene editing to the medical field may only be a stone's throw a...

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Navigating The European Court Of Justice Stance On GMOs NAVIGATING THE EUROPEAN COURT OF JUSTICE STANCE ON GMOS

blog article

Mar 11, 2019

“The breeder’s dream is, of course, of an agency which would enable him to produce at will a particular kind of mutation uncontaminated by others which would merely be a nuisance to him.” “There is as yet no indication from th...

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Can we heal wounds by printing skin? CAN WE HEAL WOUNDS BY PRINTING SKIN?

blog article

Mar 11, 2019

Printing layers of skin to help treat chronic wounds or burns may be on the horizon, thanks to a newly developed mobile skin bioprinting system. Scientists at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) in Winston-Salem, NC, have...

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Could sleep apnea be a risk factor for Alzheimer COULD SLEEP APNEA BE A RISK FACTOR FOR ALZHEIMER'S?

blog article

Mar 11, 2019

The majority of people with sleep apnea do not receive a diagnosis. However, brain scans have revealed that there may be an association between this condition and a form of dementia. According to the American Sleep Apnea Association (ASAA), an estima...

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Effort to Regulate Chemicals in Personal Care Products Commended EFFORT TO REGULATE CHEMICALS IN PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS COMMENDED

blog article

Mar 11, 2019

The Endocrine Society applauded the reintroduction of a Senate bill that would give government regulators needed authority to protect consumers from exposure to hazardous endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in cosmetics and other personal care prod...

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How Can We Reduce Food Wastage? HOW CAN WE REDUCE FOOD WASTAGE?

blog article

Mar 11, 2019

Food waste can be problematic at all-you-can-eat buffet-style restaurants or university dining halls for obvious reasons: With little incentive to pile less food on their plate, diners tend to overindulge. One way to curb such behavior is a food wast...

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Does the rhetoric of consumer genetics aim to eliminate disability without mentioning it? DOES THE RHETORIC OF CONSUMER GENETICS AIM TO ELIMINATE DISABILITY WITHOUT MENTIONING IT?

blog article

Mar 10, 2019

In 2011, poet and writer George Estreich wrote about the impact of biotechnology on family life in his first book, The Shape of the Eye. The memoir centers on how his family’s life was changed, and enriched, by the birth of his second child, La...

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How yo-yo dieting impacts women HOW YO-YO DIETING IMPACTS WOMEN'S HEART HEALTH

blog article

Mar 10, 2019

New research reveals worrying associations between yo-yo dieting and seven well-established markers of cardiovascular health. As if losing weight wasn't hard enough, up to 80 percent of people who manage to lose more than 10 percent of their body...

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The Most Extreme Complex Life in the World THE MOST EXTREME COMPLEX LIFE IN THE WORLD

video

Mar 09, 2019

Humans can’t go too far above or below sea level unaided, but there are some complex forms of life that CAN survive at super high elevations or in the deepest parts of the ocean.

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New drug may stop sepsis from reaching major organs NEW DRUG MAY STOP SEPSIS FROM REACHING MAJOR ORGANS

blog article

Mar 09, 2019

Researchers discover a drug that has the potential to stop sepsis before the condition reaches major organs and becomes fatal. Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that occurs when an existing infection such as one that develops in a cut, a re...

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Mutant monkey clones could aid study of autism MUTANT MONKEY CLONES COULD AID STUDY OF AUTISM

blog article

Mar 08, 2019

Scientists have created five monkey clones, all carrying the edited version of a specific gene. The monkeys’ birth shows that it is possible to make genetically identical primates that can serve as models of specific conditions. Genetically ide...

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Medicare Beneficiaries at a Glance MEDICARE BENEFICIARIES AT A GLANCE

infographic

Mar 08, 2019

There were some 57 million Americans enrolled in Medicare in 2016 with the majority (68 percent) still enrolled in the traditional Medicare fee-for-service program, according to a new infographic by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

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Is “sitting on your hands” an option these days for babies with bronchiolitis? IS “SITTING ON YOUR HANDS” AN OPTION THESE DAYS FOR BABIES WITH BRONCHIOLITIS?

blog article

Mar 08, 2019

Pediatric doctors and nurses have long been dismayed that we have no useful interventions (other than supportive therapy) for babies with bronchiolitis. We have known for decades that using nebulizers, doing chest x-rays, and starting antibiotics are...

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Why do doctors underdiagnose these 3 conditions in women? WHY DO DOCTORS UNDERDIAGNOSE THESE 3 CONDITIONS IN WOMEN?

blog article

Mar 08, 2019

International Women's Day prompts us to celebrate women and womanhood. However, recent research suggests that women may face more than their fair share of challenges, including in receiving appropriate medical care. What are some of these challen...

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Tiny DNA Reader Advances Anti-cancer Drug Development TINY DNA READER ADVANCES ANTI-CANCER DRUG DEVELOPMENT

blog article

Mar 08, 2019

DNA is small. Really, really, small. So, when researchers want to study the structure of a single-stranded DNA, they can’t just pull out their microscopes: they have to get creative. In a study published this week in Scientific Reports, researc...

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Optical imaging technique to detect tiny tumours OPTICAL IMAGING TECHNIQUE TO DETECT TINY TUMOURS

blog article

Mar 08, 2019

Researchers have developed an imaging system called ‘DOLPHIN’, which enables the identification of tiny tumors deep inside the body. MIT researchers used their newly developed system to track a 0.1-millimeter fluorescent probe through the...

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Enlisting Stem Cells in the War on Heart Disease ENLISTING STEM CELLS IN THE WAR ON HEART DISEASE

blog article

Mar 08, 2019

The heart works tirelessly for a whole lifetime, pumping fresh blood to the far reaches of the body, supplying oxygen and nutrients. When the heart itself is deprived of blood caused by a blocked artery, the affected tissue withers, and scars and can...

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Gut Microbiome Analysis – Getting It Right GUT MICROBIOME ANALYSIS – GETTING IT RIGHT

blog article

Mar 08, 2019

The cascade of new discoveries relating to health and disease to our gut microbiome has spurred the notion that we now find ourselves in the middle of a “microbiome revolution”. Just to mention some recent examples, mechanisms have been d...

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Like Genes, Our Microbes Pass from Parent to Child LIKE GENES, OUR MICROBES PASS FROM PARENT TO CHILD

blog article

Mar 07, 2019

We all know that our parents pass on heritable traits, including skin color and height, to us through their genes. Now, the Human Microbiome Project - a department of the National Institute of Health - has produced findings to suggest that our microb...

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Novel enzyme from LGC, Biosearch Technologies is fast and specific, even at room temperature NOVEL ENZYME FROM LGC, BIOSEARCH TECHNOLOGIES IS FAST AND SPECIFIC, EVEN AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

blog article

Mar 07, 2019

This reverse transcriptase has a temperature optimum from 55 - 80 °C, improving reaction specificity and allowing synthesis from diverse RNA templates.  It is also fast, with a reaction time of five minutes or less, and recommended for targe...

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How Induced Pluripotency Changed Stem Cell Science HOW INDUCED PLURIPOTENCY CHANGED STEM CELL SCIENCE

blog article

Mar 07, 2019

An important achievement in stem cell research was recognized in 2012 when the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to two scientists who transformed the field: Shinya Yamanaka and John Gurdon. Together, they received the award for &ldqu...

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Potential EBV-associated cancer treatment in small molecule inhibitors POTENTIAL EBV-ASSOCIATED CANCER TREATMENT IN SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS

blog article

Mar 07, 2019

A drug candidate for cancers that are associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been identified. Researchers at The Wistar Institute created a drug candidate for cancer associated with EBV, describing inhibitors of the protein EBNA1, Epstein-Barr ...

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Cryopreservation Freezing Solutions CRYOPRESERVATION FREEZING SOLUTIONS

blog article

Mar 07, 2019

Cryopreservation is designed to minimize damage to cells. For most eukaryotic samples whether bovine sperm, heirloom beer yeast, umbilical cord blood, or genetically engineered CAR-T cells—this means maintaining them cold enough so their bioche...

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HOT TRENDS IN THE WORLD OF PATHOLOGY HOT TRENDS IN THE WORLD OF PATHOLOGY

blog article

Mar 06, 2019

A periodic list of methods, tools, and people driving research and development. Our scientists present six tools and strategies influencing pathology. Artificial intelligence and machine learning: With the rise in whole slide scanner technology, larg...

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It’s time to put a hard stop to antibiotic overprescribing in hospitals IT’S TIME TO PUT A HARD STOP TO ANTIBIOTIC OVERPRESCRIBING IN HOSPITALS

blog article

Mar 06, 2019

Improvements in primary care antibiotic use have not been matched in secondary care. Although hospitals account for a minority of human antibiotic use, they are where most broad-spectrum antibiotics are prescribed. A government report published 20 ye...

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The Full Authority Companion Diagnostic THE FULL AUTHORITY COMPANION DIAGNOSTIC

blog article

Mar 06, 2019

It is very likely that on your last flight the turbofan engines were controlled by full authority digital engine controls – FADECs for short. FADECs have played a significant role in keeping airline ticket prices low (except during holidays) by...

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What Kind Of Plant Genes Allow Crops To Shape The Rhizosphere Microbiota? WHAT KIND OF PLANT GENES ALLOW CROPS TO SHAPE THE RHIZOSPHERE MICROBIOTA?

blog article

Mar 06, 2019

In my lab, we aim to decipher the genetic basis of plant-microbe interactions taking place at the root-soil interface, in the so-called “rhizosphere”. Microbes in this environment collectively referred to as the rhizosphere microbiota, ca...

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When Life Gives You Sour Lemons, Use Genetics to Find Out Why WHEN LIFE GIVES YOU SOUR LEMONS, USE GENETICS TO FIND OUT WHY

blog article

Mar 06, 2019

A team of researchers, including two from the University of California, Riverside, has identified the genes responsible for the hallmark sour taste of many citrus fruits. Published in Nature Communications, the research could help plant breeders deve...

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Taking the Sting Out of Mouth Ulcers TAKING THE STING OUT OF MOUTH ULCERS

blog article

Mar 06, 2019

A large breakthrough has been made in the genetic understanding of mouth ulcers which could provide the potential for a new drug to prevent or heal the painful lesions. Mouth ulcers affect up to 25 percent of young adults and a higher proportion of c...

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Bacteria Offer Safe Alternative to Chemical Pesticides BACTERIA OFFER SAFE ALTERNATIVE TO CHEMICAL PESTICIDES

blog article

Mar 06, 2019

Repurposing a strain of beneficial bacteria could offer a safe, sustainable and natural alternative to man-made chemical pesticides, according to research from Cardiff University, in collaboration with the Universities of Warwick and Liverpool, and t...

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The Brain Uses Sleep to Reduce DNA Damage THE BRAIN USES SLEEP TO REDUCE DNA DAMAGE

blog article

Mar 06, 2019

Why do animals sleep? Why do humans “waste” a third time of their lives sleeping? Throughout evolution, sleep has remained universal and essential to all organisms with a nervous system, including invertebrates such as flies, worms, and e...

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Cell Mechanism Delays and Repairs DNA Damage CELL MECHANISM DELAYS AND REPAIRS DNA DAMAGE

blog article

Mar 06, 2019

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered a mechanism that gives human cells a chance to stop piling up mutations when cells replicate and divide in the body. The discovery could prove to be very useful in the development of new t...

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Salamander gene partnerships could help spinal cord regeneration SALAMANDER GENE PARTNERSHIPS COULD HELP SPINAL CORD REGENERATION

blog article

Mar 06, 2019

Scientists have identified certain gene partnerships that promote the regeneration of spinal cords. Researchers at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) investigated genetic relationships between gene partners in axolotl salamander that allow the ne...

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DEPRESSION AND THE MICROBIOME DEPRESSION AND THE MICROBIOME

blog article

Mar 05, 2019

New research is regularly being published on the connection between the gut microbiome and the central nervous system (CNS) together known as the gut-brain axis. Alterations in the composition of intestinal microbiota have also been associated with a...

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What You Can Do to Help Children Adjust to Daylight Saving Time WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP CHILDREN ADJUST TO DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME

blog article

Mar 05, 2019

Daylight saving time can bring a welcome end to the short, dark days of winter, but it can also disrupt our natural sleep cycles. If parents fail to plan ahead, the consequence is short-term sleep deprivation for their children and teens. This can ca...

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Perspectives on Pilot Plants PERSPECTIVES ON PILOT PLANTS

blog article

Mar 05, 2019

Pilot plants represent a milestone in a drug’s commercial development, where drug sponsors first explore engineering, commercialization, clinical, regulatory, and process issues outside the relative safety of a laboratory scale. And, as the tes...

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Seventure Continues Microbiome Investment Success with Second Fund SEVENTURE CONTINUES MICROBIOME INVESTMENT SUCCESS WITH SECOND FUND

blog article

Mar 05, 2019

After the success of the world’s first fund dedicated solely to companies in the microbiome space, the French venture capital firm Seventure Partners has completed the first closing of a second microbiome fund, which is expected to total €...

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Is it safe to mix ibuprofen and alcohol? IS IT SAFE TO MIX IBUPROFEN AND ALCOHOL?

blog article

Mar 05, 2019

Many people are aware that taking ibuprofen at the same time as alcohol is not always safe, but what are the risks, and when is it dangerous? Ibuprofen is an over-the-counter medication that people use to reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. It is a...

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Canaries in a coal-mine: what can sheep and goats tell us about human parasitic disease in Tanzania? CANARIES IN A COAL-MINE: WHAT CAN SHEEP AND GOATS TELL US ABOUT HUMAN PARASITIC DISEASE IN TANZANIA?

blog article

Mar 05, 2019

As research reveals the cause of a massive but neglected disease problem in sheep and goats, we ask - could this animal health problem be an early warning of a hidden human disease problem in Tanzania? Sheep and goats are widely kept in Tanzania...

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Genetic "Conductor" of Brain Stem Cells GENETIC "CONDUCTOR" OF BRAIN STEM CELLS

blog article

Mar 05, 2019

Our brain comprises 85 billion nerve cells and just as many so-called glial cells, which work in close contact with the former to guarantee their proper function. All originate from brain stem cells. But what decides when and how many of them become ...

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Immune System Puts the "Brakes" On IMMUNE SYSTEM PUTS THE "BRAKES" ON

blog article

Mar 05, 2019

The scientists say the findings could lead to new treatments for life-threatening infections such as leishmaniasis, as well as autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases. Our immune system protects us from invading pathogens but also has the capaci...

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5 Biotech Industry Challenges the EU’s Horizon Program Plans to Tackle 5 BIOTECH INDUSTRY CHALLENGES THE EU’S HORIZON PROGRAM PLANS TO TACKLE

blog article

Mar 05, 2019

While the EU’s Horizon funding program is more often associated with academic research, a sizeable proportion of its funds are invested in the European biotech industry. With a new stage of the program being close to launch, I investigated some...

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Charge Flow Through Protein Sparks Excitement CHARGE FLOW THROUGH PROTEIN SPARKS EXCITEMENT

blog article

Mar 05, 2019

Among the zoo of biomolecules essential to life, proteins are the most startlingly varied and versatile. These complex structures, generated from the DNA code and built from some 20 amino acids play a central role in innumerable life processes. In th...

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Testing Safety in Gene-editing TESTING SAFETY IN GENE-EDITING

blog article

Mar 05, 2019

Chinese and international scientists have developed a new technique to evaluate the safety of genome-editing tools - a method that could become the industry standard. The research was published in Science. The technique - known as "GOTI," f...

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What causes urethra pain in men and women? WHAT CAUSES URETHRA PAIN IN MEN AND WOMEN?

blog article

Mar 04, 2019

The urethra forms part of the lower urinary system. It is the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body. Sometimes, the urethra can become inflamed and painful. In this article, we outline the possible causes of urethra pain and provid...

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Top 10 Young European Biotech Entrepreneurs in 2019 TOP 10 YOUNG EUROPEAN BIOTECH ENTREPRENEURS IN 2019

blog article

Mar 04, 2019

As an industry where innovation is always first, biotech attracts many young entrepreneurs whose ideas could change the world. Here’s our list of some of the most inspiring leaders behind the new generation of biotech companies in Europe. Europ...

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Psychedelics: Risks and benefits of microdosing revealed PSYCHEDELICS: RISKS AND BENEFITS OF MICRODOSING REVEALED

blog article

Mar 04, 2019

New research, published in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, finds both potential benefits and risks of using psychedelic microdosing to treat mental health problems. The study reveals effects on cognitive skills and sociability, as well as meta...

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How do oral bacteria make colorectal cancer more aggressive? HOW DO ORAL BACTERIA MAKE COLORECTAL CANCER MORE AGGRESSIVE?

blog article

Mar 04, 2019

Scientists have identified a molecular mechanism through which an oral bacterium accelerates colorectal cancer growth. Tests have shown that around a third of people who develop colorectal cancer also have the bacterium, which has the name Fusob...

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Breath Test for Cancer: Biomarker Screening is Underway BREATH TEST FOR CANCER: BIOMARKER SCREENING IS UNDERWAY

blog article

Mar 04, 2019

The thought that compounds in the breath could be measured and assessed to diagnose different aspects of pathology is an exciting prospect. As part of the search for diagnostic tests that don’t rely on invasive tissue biopsies, breath biopsies ...

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Real-time Footage of Living Bacteria Aids Antibiotic Hunt REAL-TIME FOOTAGE OF LIVING BACTERIA AIDS ANTIBIOTIC HUNT

blog article

Mar 04, 2019

Indiana University researchers are advancing knowledge about how bacteria build their cell walls that could contribute to the search for new antibacterial drugs. They have created a new tool to observe living cells in real time under a microscope. &q...

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Spider Silk Could Be Used As Robotic Muscle SPIDER SILK COULD BE USED AS ROBOTIC MUSCLE

blog article

Mar 04, 2019

Spider silk, already known as one of the strongest materials for its weight, turns out to have another unusual property that might lead to new kinds of artificial muscles or robotic actuators, researchers have found. The resilient fibers, the team di...

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10 Unusual Applications of CRISPR Gene Editing 10 UNUSUAL APPLICATIONS OF CRISPR GENE EDITING

blog article

Mar 04, 2019

CRISPR has been all over the news in the past couple of years, and with reason. This gene editing tool is making gene editing easier and faster than ever, and the possibilities it has opened go well beyond human health. You might have heard of the tr...

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Exploring the Genes Underpinning Evolution EXPLORING THE GENES UNDERPINNING EVOLUTION

blog article

Mar 04, 2019

Not just since climate change has it been of enormous interest to understand how populations adapt to new environmental conditions. Scientists assume that most adaptations involve a large number of different genes, but most molecularly characterized ...

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Ultrasound scans could boost screenings for osteoporosis ULTRASOUND SCANS COULD BOOST SCREENINGS FOR OSTEOPOROSIS

blog article

Mar 04, 2019

A new study that aimed to advance methods of assessing bone health found that data from ultrasound scans were equal to those gathered using X-ray. The way we live shapes our bones. There are a lot of things we can do to help keep our bones healthy. B...

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Calm State of Stem Cells Preserves Regenerative Capacity in Aging Brain CALM STATE OF STEM CELLS PRESERVES REGENERATIVE CAPACITY IN AGING BRAIN

blog article

Mar 04, 2019

Scientists from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg and from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have been able to rejuvenate stem cells in the brain of aging mice. The revitalized stem cells impr...

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Munchies: Does cannabis really increase desire for junk food? MUNCHIES: DOES CANNABIS REALLY INCREASE DESIRE FOR JUNK FOOD?

blog article

Mar 03, 2019

A recent study shows that one of the stereotypical behaviors that people associate with consuming marijuana may have a firm basis in truth legalizing cannabis produces a spike in junk food sales. In the United States, marijuana laws have changed imme...

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Foods You FOODS YOU'RE EATING YOU DIDN'T KNOW ARE GMOS!

video

Mar 02, 2019

The letters GMO stand for “genetically modified organism.” That means that the genes that make up the DNA of a plant, animal, or microorganism, were altered in a way that does not occur naturally. Lots of people are against consuming GMO ...

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The Anatomy of the Healthcare Revenue Cycle THE ANATOMY OF THE HEALTHCARE REVENUE CYCLE

infographic

Mar 01, 2019

The healthcare revenue cycle is made up of several important steps that all work together to increase cash flow within a medical practice. There are a couple of statistics that demonstrate several key points within the revenue cycle.

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What Does The Future Hold For AI In Digital Pathology? WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD FOR AI IN DIGITAL PATHOLOGY?

blog article

Mar 01, 2019

This is the second of a two-part blog post. In his first post, Liron wrote on embedding AI in Digital Pathology workflows. Digital Pathology AI apps are certainly feasible, but exactly when they will be ready for clinical use is less clear. There are...

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New 8-Letter DNA Rewrites the Genetic Code NEW 8-LETTER DNA REWRITES THE GENETIC CODE

video

Mar 01, 2019

Scientists have successfully created synthetic DNA with twice as many base pairs as normal, with potential implications in medicine, data storage, and even understanding how life could evolve elsewhere in the universe.

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Ten Minute Gene Test for Antimicrobial Resistance TEN MINUTE GENE TEST FOR ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE

blog article

Mar 01, 2019

Researchers at American University have developed a new, highly sensitive rapid genetic test that can determine whether bacteria carries a gene that causes resistance to two common antibiotics used to treat strep throat and other respiratory illnesse...

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Parade Gene Controls Pigment Stem Cells in Zebrafish PARADE GENE CONTROLS PIGMENT STEM CELLS IN ZEBRAFISH

blog article

Mar 01, 2019

Scientists at the University of Bath have identified how a mutant gene in fish is involved in controlling stem cells. A new study from the group of Professor Robert Kelsh in the Department of Biology & Biochemistry looks at how a novel group of s...

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Building an Atlas of Acute Myeloid Leukemia BUILDING AN ATLAS OF ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

blog article

Mar 01, 2019

A team of researchers led by Bradley Bernstein at the Ludwig Center at Harvard has used single-cell technologies and machine learning to create a detailed "atlas of cell states" for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that could help improve treat...

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Asian longhorned ticks getting ready to spread further in the US ASIAN LONGHORNED TICKS GETTING READY TO SPREAD FURTHER IN THE US

blog article

Mar 01, 2019

Krisztian Magori provides an update on the geographical distribution of the Asian longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis) in the United States, and his personal perspective getting involved in tracking this invasive tick. Last August I publi...

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Genetic study confirms that numerous genes contribute to Tourette’s syndrome GENETIC STUDY CONFIRMS THAT NUMEROUS GENES CONTRIBUTE TO TOURETTE’S SYNDROME

blog article

Mar 01, 2019

A meta-analysis of a number of studies has found that variants in numerous genes work together to contribute to Tourette’s syndrome. A meta-analysis of numerous studies into Tourette’s syndrome (TS) has found that variants in hundreds of ...

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Equity Crowdfunding for Biotech Startups: Does it Work? EQUITY CROWDFUNDING FOR BIOTECH STARTUPS: DOES IT WORK?

blog article

Mar 01, 2019

In the last decade, crowdfunding has become a popular way to finance all sorts of projects and products. Biotech is no exception, but many questions whether the high risk and long term nature of investing in the biotech industry make it a good fit fo...

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Genetics Companies Partner to Improve Hemp Crops as FDA Fast-Tracks Regulation Hearings GENETICS COMPANIES PARTNER TO IMPROVE HEMP CROPS AS FDA FAST-TRACKS REGULATION HEARINGS

blog article

Mar 01, 2019

Genetics company California Hemp Corporation and crop improvement startup Benson Hill Biosystems have entered into a new sponsored research partnership with UC Davis to breed improved cultivars of industrial hemp that are well-suited for Central Cali...

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A gene therapy platform for treating diseases A GENE THERAPY PLATFORM FOR TREATING DISEASES

video

Mar 01, 2019

Patients with the most common childhood cancer, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), often battle the disease for years. Life for these brave kids who undergo round after round of chemotherapy in an effort to keep their disease in check is anything bu...

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Vitamin D and Brain Function VITAMIN D AND BRAIN FUNCTION

video

Mar 01, 2019

The push to prevent skin cancer may have come with unintended consequences impaired brain function because of a deficiency of vitamin D. And although vitamin D is well known for promoting bone health and regulating vital calcium levels hence its addi...

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Researchers Have Found a Weed Killer Chemical in Popular Wine and Beer RESEARCHERS HAVE FOUND A WEED KILLER CHEMICAL IN POPULAR WINE AND BEER

blog article

Feb 28, 2019

U.S. scientists have found a chemical normally found in weed killer in store-bought samples of popular beer and wine.  Their analysis used a protocol developed with Agilent equipment. Scientists with the U.S. Public Interest Research Group exami...

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Applications/Reagents: IncuCyte reagents are presented as lyophilized products APPLICATIONS/REAGENTS: INCUCYTE REAGENTS ARE PRESENTED AS LYOPHILIZED PRODUCTS

blog article

Feb 28, 2019

Many of our IncuCyte reagents are presented as lyophilized products. Did you know that bringing these reagents to ambient temperature before resuspending them will ensure that they are dissolved fully?

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Superficial Radiation Therapy: A Non-surgical Treatment for Non-melanoma Skin Cancers SUPERFICIAL RADIATION THERAPY: A NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR NON-MELANOMA SKIN CANCERS

blog article

Feb 28, 2019

Skin cancer can be broadly split into two types: melanoma and non-melanoma. The most common non-melanomas include basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, for which the main treatment is surgery. However, other non-surgical options are emerg...

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ChIP and Other Methods to Study DNA-Protein Interactions CHIP AND OTHER METHODS TO STUDY DNA-PROTEIN INTERACTIONS

blog article

Feb 28, 2019

Knowing which DNA sequences interact with which proteins can reveal a lot about chromatin organization and the role of histone post-translational modifications and with it about enhancers and promoters, effects of mutations and interventions, transcr...

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More Efficient Bispecific Antibody Purification With Fewer Steps MORE EFFICIENT BISPECIFIC ANTIBODY PURIFICATION WITH FEWER STEPS

whitepaper

Feb 28, 2019

A single-step downstream process using protein A chromatography to purify a bispecific antibody (BsAb) in early screening has been successfully developed to replace an existing-three step process. The goal was to separate BsAb monomer from fragments ...

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Golden Death Bacillus – the nematode digesting bacteria with biocontrol potential GOLDEN DEATH BACILLUS – THE NEMATODE DIGESTING BACTERIA WITH BIOCONTROL POTENTIAL

blog article

Feb 28, 2019

Parasitic worms can cause huge damage by infecting humans and livestock, but the effectiveness of drugs commonly used against them is waning due to increasing resistance. Here Tony Page discusses his group’s study in BMC Biology on how the &ldq...

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Calling for a change in STEM culture to retain underrepresented students CALLING FOR A CHANGE IN STEM CULTURE TO RETAIN UNDERREPRESENTED STUDENTS

blog article

Feb 28, 2019

Women and students of color are widely underrepresented in the majority of STEM fields. Most discussions take a ‘deficit’ approach to the problem, citing deficits of minority groups as a reason for discrepancy. However a new study looks a...

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Counteracting T-cell exhaustion in CAR-T cancer therapies COUNTERACTING T-CELL EXHAUSTION IN CAR-T CANCER THERAPIES

blog article

Feb 28, 2019

With a growing number of cancer patients being offered CAR-T therapy, issues remain with T-cells refusing to work because of a phenomenon called T-cell exhaustion. CAR-T therapy is where patients own immune cells are taken from the body, and genetica...

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Does artemisinin help treat cancer? DOES ARTEMISININ HELP TREAT CANCER?

blog article

Feb 28, 2019

Artemisinin is a chemical compound in a traditional Chinese herb called Artemisia annua, or sweet wormwood. Some research suggests that it may show promise in future cancer treatments. Research indicates that the compound could inhibit the growth of ...

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BEST for QC Microbiology Training BEST FOR QC MICROBIOLOGY TRAINING

whitepaper

Feb 27, 2019

Bioburden testing is critical for monitoring water quality and raw materials and for ensuring that manufacturing processes remain in microbiological control. During the first day of the training, you will learn about Advantages and limitations of mem...

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Phthalates: The Everywhere Chemical That’s Hard to See, Not Anymore with LC-MS/MS PHTHALATES: THE EVERYWHERE CHEMICAL THAT’S HARD TO SEE, NOT ANYMORE WITH LC-MS/MS

blog article

Feb 27, 2019

A few months back, the American Academy of Pediatrics published a technical report on the use of chemicals in food processing and the negative health effects on children. One of the main culprits is phthalates. The 411 of Phthalates are esters of pht...

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How Does Maternal Microbiome Composition Influence Offspring Metabolic Outcomes? HOW DOES MATERNAL MICROBIOME COMPOSITION INFLUENCE OFFSPRING METABOLIC OUTCOMES?

blog article

Feb 27, 2019

Professor Margaret Morris is Chair and Head of Pharmacology, School of Medical Sciences, University of NSW. Her research explores the underlying brain mechanisms in epilepsy, obesity, diabetes, and the link between obesity and high blood pressure. We...

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The Bioinformatics Core - Giving life to data THE BIOINFORMATICS CORE - GIVING LIFE TO DATA

video

Feb 27, 2019

Medical research is very much about data. The Bioinformatics Core of the University of Luxembourg, a group of computer scientists and bioinformaticians at the LCSB, works on unlocking the full potential of this ever-growing amount of complex scientif...

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Custom-made proteins create antibodies to fight HIV CUSTOM-MADE PROTEINS CREATE ANTIBODIES TO FIGHT HIV

blog article

Feb 27, 2019

A new way to create proteins that can sneak through HIV’s protective coating may be a step toward understanding the key components needed for developing a vaccine for the virus, according to researchers. Using computational modeling, a team of ...

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How to treat eye discharge in newborns HOW TO TREAT EYE DISCHARGE IN NEWBORNS

blog article

Feb 27, 2019

Eye discharge is common in newborns and is commonly due to a blocked tear duct. A person can often treat an infant with a blocked tear duct at home. However, discharge that occurs alongside other symptoms in the eye area, such as redness, swelling, o...

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Colon cancer pathway discovery could lead to targeted therapies COLON CANCER PATHWAY DISCOVERY COULD LEAD TO TARGETED THERAPIES

blog article

Feb 27, 2019

University of Massachusetts Amherst food science researchers have pinpointed a set of enzymes involved in tumor growth that could be targeted to prevent or treat colon cancer. “We think this is a very interesting discovery,” says Dr. Guod...

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What are the pros and cons of GMO foods? WHAT ARE THE PROS AND CONS OF GMO FOODS?

blog article

Feb 27, 2019

Engineers design plants using genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, to be tougher, more nutritious, or taste better. However, people have concerns over their safety, and there is much debate about the pros and cons of using GMOs. A manufacturer cr...

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ALS: New technique prevents toxic protein deposits in cells ALS: NEW TECHNIQUE PREVENTS TOXIC PROTEIN DEPOSITS IN CELLS

blog article

Feb 27, 2019

The vast majority of people who develop the rare neurological disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have one feature in common: the toxic buildup of faulty TDP-43 protein in the affected nerve cells. Postmortem evidence suggests that 97 percent ...

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Would you remove unwanted memories from your brain? WOULD YOU REMOVE UNWANTED MEMORIES FROM YOUR BRAIN?

video

Feb 27, 2019

Everyone has memories they would rather forget, and they may know the triggers that bring them bouncing back. Bad memories can underlie a number of problems, from post-traumatic stress disorder to phobias.

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Nature vs. nurture: Do genes influence our morals? NATURE VS. NURTURE: DO GENES INFLUENCE OUR MORALS?

blog article

Feb 27, 2019

To what extent do environment and education shape our moral compass, and how responsible is the genetic cocktail we inherit from our parents? Recent research aims to get to the heart of the matter. The well-known "nature versus nurture" deb...

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An Update on Microplastics in the Environment AN UPDATE ON MICROPLASTICS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

blog article

Feb 26, 2019

Chemical & Engineering News has published a “State of the Union” update on microplastics in the environment. These are not little bits of plastic that may flake off of your water bottle, that you could isolate with a filter.  The...

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Why the GMO Regulations in Europe are ‘Not Fit for Purpose’ WHY THE GMO REGULATIONS IN EUROPE ARE ‘NOT FIT FOR PURPOSE’

blog article

Feb 26, 2019

The controversial decision by the European court's last summer to regulate gene edited organisms as GMOs has already had a damaging effect on European biotechs working in this area. Many believe it could have been prevented through better dialogu...

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INVESTIGATING IMMUNOMODULATION: EXAMINING GVHD USING HUMANIZED NSG MICE FROM JAX INVESTIGATING IMMUNOMODULATION: EXAMINING GVHD USING HUMANIZED NSG MICE FROM JAX

blog article

Feb 26, 2019

Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD), a systemic inflammatory condition, is the result of a reaction between transplanted donor T cells recognizing the antigenic disparities between the host and the recipient, which can result in multi-organ damage. Many...

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What Happens To Your Body When You Drink Too Much Coffee WHAT HAPPENS TO YOUR BODY WHEN YOU DRINK TOO MUCH COFFEE

video

Feb 26, 2019

It’s almost impossible to overdose on coffee. The average American drinks 3 cups of coffee per day and there is a lethal dose of caffeine, but it’s somewhere around 10 grams. And the average cup of joe has around 100 milligrams.

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The Role of Heirloom Crops vs Genetic Engineering in Future Food Systems THE ROLE OF HEIRLOOM CROPS VS GENETIC ENGINEERING IN FUTURE FOOD SYSTEMS

blog article

Feb 26, 2019

The food system is a tale of two halves today. On one side, consumers want to go back in time to eat locally-sourced, clean, simple, organic produce, including a growing taste for vintage varieties of certain fruits and vegetables. Technically called...

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Obesity and the OBESITY AND THE 'SELF-CONTROL' BRAIN AREA: WHAT IS THE LINK?

blog article

Feb 26, 2019

New research suggests that there is a "reciprocal relationship" between obesity and the brain's prefrontal cortex an area scientists associate with self-control, among other functions. Many people think obesity, overeating, or losi...

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Microfluidics device to detect cancer cells in blood MICROFLUIDICS DEVICE TO DETECT CANCER CELLS IN BLOOD

blog article

Feb 26, 2019

Scientists have developed a microfluidic device that is able to isolate individual cancer cells from patient blood samples. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Queensland University of Technology of Australia developed the device...

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Five facts to know about penicillin allergy FIVE FACTS TO KNOW ABOUT PENICILLIN ALLERGY

blog article

Feb 26, 2019

Nine out of 10 people who believe they're allergic to the antibiotic either aren't allergic or have only some intolerance, and eight of 10 people who had an allergic reaction to penicillin 10 or more years ago will now be fine. Two McMaster U...

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Insomnia: Certain types of brain cell explain genetic risk INSOMNIA: CERTAIN TYPES OF BRAIN CELL EXPLAIN GENETIC RISK

blog article

Feb 26, 2019

New research in the journal Nature Genetics identifies individual types of brain cell and brain areas that are involved in insomnia, offering new treatment targets for this condition. Insomnia affects about a third of people living in the United Stat...

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Secret life of antimicrobial peptide revealed through CRISPR SECRET LIFE OF ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDE REVEALED THROUGH CRISPR

blog article

Feb 26, 2019

When it comes to the immune system, we usually think about lymphocytes like B- and T-cells or macrophages going on constant seek-and-destroy missions against invading pathogens like bacteria and viruses. But our immune system actually includes a less...

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'ANTIBACTERIAL' CHEMICAL IN TOOTHPASTE COULD STRENGTHEN BACTERIA

blog article

Feb 26, 2019

New research finds that triclosan, a popular antibacterial chemical, could have the opposite effect and make bacteria more rather than less resilient to antibiotic treatment.  Triclosan is an antibacterial compound present in the everyday h...

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Bumper scan of genomes pinpoints inherited risk factors for autism BUMPER SCAN OF GENOMES PINPOINTS INHERITED RISK FACTORS FOR AUTISM

blog article

Feb 25, 2019

A new analysis of DNA from more than 20,000 people with autism identifies 12 regions in the genome that harbor inherited risk factors for the condition. The findings appear today in Nature Genetics1. The study is the largest-yet exploration of inheri...

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Utilising Machine Learning Models To Transform Plant Genomics UTILISING MACHINE LEARNING MODELS TO TRANSFORM PLANT GENOMICS

blog article

Feb 25, 2019

A lot of machine learning is used in technology such as Google Assistant, Amazon’s Alexa or Apple’s Siri, or to get rid of spam in your email inbox. Deep learning and rapid development of this technology enable us to solve image classific...

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IF YOU’RE HAPPY AND YOU KNOW IT, THANK YOUR BUGS IF YOU’RE HAPPY AND YOU KNOW IT, THANK YOUR BUGS

blog article

Feb 25, 2019

Research published in Nature Microbiology earlier this month suggests bidirectional communication between the brain and belly bugs. Indeed, by analyzing metagenomic data and survey questions from large Belgian cohort (Flemish Gut Flora Project) of in...

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Acceligen Will Use Gene Editing to Improve Health and Welfare of Agricultural Animals, Inc Antibiotics Reduction ACCELIGEN WILL USE GENE EDITING TO IMPROVE HEALTH AND WELFARE OF AGRICULTURAL ANIMALS, INC ANTIBIOTICS REDUCTION

blog article

Feb 25, 2019

Recombinetics, the gene editing company operating in agriculture and human therapeutics, is spinning out its agriculture business into a new company called Acceligen. Acceligen will focus on gene editing animals to improve their health — reduci...

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What to Know About High-Fat Diets and Your Microbiome WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT HIGH-FAT DIETS AND YOUR MICROBIOME

blog article

Feb 25, 2019

A high-fat diet changes the bacterial communities in the gut and increases the biomarkers of inflammation. The typical “Westernized” diet of processed and fast foods high in fat and added sugars have been linked to many health problems, i...

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Accelerator or Incubator? What to Look for in a Biotech Startup Program ACCELERATOR OR INCUBATOR? WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN A BIOTECH STARTUP PROGRAM

blog article

Feb 25, 2019

Early stage biotech companies and scientists interested in commercialization need great accelerator programs, not more biotech incubators. Biotech companies and scientists who start out on the road to commercialization may need an accelerator to brin...

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Are We Ready to Edit the Fetal Genome? ARE WE READY TO EDIT THE FETAL GENOME?

video

Feb 25, 2019

Gene therapy is really complicated both scientifically and ethically. But it also has the potential to do some amazing things - like treating life threatening diseases in babies before they are even born.

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Vitamin D and brain health: New mechanism may explain the link VITAMIN D AND BRAIN HEALTH: NEW MECHANISM MAY EXPLAIN THE LINK

blog article

Feb 25, 2019

New research finds that vitamin D deficiency affects a type of brain "scaffolding" that supports the neurons. This finding could lead to new therapies for the neurological symptoms of mental health conditions such as schizophrenia. Vit...

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Book mechanism identified as a communication method for bacterial toxins BOOK MECHANISM IDENTIFIED AS A COMMUNICATION METHOD FOR BACTERIAL TOXINS

blog article

Feb 25, 2019

Researchers have uncovered the unique method a certain bacteria use to deliver toxins. Scientists at Binghampton University, State University of New York, uncovered how the gram-negative bacterium communicates through transporting small molecules. Th...

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How tGBS-driven genomic selection can help you get to market faster HOW TGBS-DRIVEN GENOMIC SELECTION CAN HELP YOU GET TO MARKET FASTER

blog article

Feb 25, 2019

Plant and animal breeding programs often take generations to improve quality and yield but using a genotyping protocol with targeted sequencing can bring you genetic gains faster. Could your plant- or animal breeding program use a boost? Applying gen...

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How chronic stress boosts cancer cell growth HOW CHRONIC STRESS BOOSTS CANCER CELL GROWTH

blog article

Feb 25, 2019

Having conducted a new study in mice, researchers now have a much better understanding of how chronic (long-term, sustained) stress can accelerate the growth of cancer stem cells. They may also have found a way to prevent stress from doing its damage...

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Diabetes: Nuts could reduce cardiovascular risk DIABETES: NUTS COULD REDUCE CARDIOVASCULAR RISK

blog article

Feb 25, 2019

New evidence supports the current recommendation for people with type 2 diabetes to eat nuts to prevent cardiovascular issues and premature death. Nuts are packed full of essential nutrients that could benefit overall health. They contain high levels...

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US adults do not consume enough protein, study warns US ADULTS DO NOT CONSUME ENOUGH PROTEIN, STUDY WARNS

blog article

Feb 25, 2019

New research in the Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging reveals that older people in the United States do not consume enough protein. Insufficient protein is a marker of poor diet and health overall, the study also suggests. With age, the h...

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TEACHING THE GENOME GENERATION TEACHING THE GENOME GENERATION

blog article

Feb 24, 2019

Since the release of the first human genome, our understanding of genetics has grown significantly. However, keeping up with developments in the field can be overwhelming for students and even teachers. Charles Wray, PhD., of The Jackson Laboratory, ...

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Onions and garlic could protect against cancer ONIONS AND GARLIC COULD PROTECT AGAINST CANCER

blog article

Feb 24, 2019

Aside from their ability to inject deep flavor into almost any meal, onions and garlic might also protect against cancer, according to a recent study. Garlic, onions, leeks, chives, and shallots are classed as allium vegetables. They are grown throug...

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Common Antimicrobial Agent Reduces the Efficacy of Antibiotics COMMON ANTIMICROBIAL AGENT REDUCES THE EFFICACY OF ANTIBIOTICS

blog article

Feb 24, 2019

Triclosan is a compound commonly added to many household products and even toys and credit cards so microbial growth will be reduced or prevented. It has been suggested that the pervasive use of antimicrobial agents might be inadvertently encouraging...

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What diet is best for older adults? WHAT DIET IS BEST FOR OLDER ADULTS?

blog article

Feb 24, 2019

A new study has revealed that a diet rich in protein and low in calories can help older adults with obesity lose more weight while maintaining muscle mass and improving bone density. Older adults often lose bone density and muscle mass when they conc...

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Is Facklamia Species an Important Pathogen? IS FACKLAMIA SPECIES AN IMPORTANT PATHOGEN?

blog article

Feb 23, 2019

Facklamia species are Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria that present a challenge for clinical labs to identify. It's α-hemolytic, catalase negative and is often misidentified as Streptococcus viridans group (SVG). Due to the d...

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Blueberries may lower cardiovascular risk by up to 20 percent BLUEBERRIES MAY LOWER CARDIOVASCULAR RISK BY UP TO 20 PERCENT

blog article

Feb 23, 2019

The phytochemicals that give blueberries their blue color can significantly improve cardiovascular health, finds a new two-part study. Dubbed "the silent killer" because it has no visible symptoms in its early stages, hypertension affects a...

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The Trouble with ELISA THE TROUBLE WITH ELISA

blog article

Feb 22, 2019

Development of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the 1970s was a great leap forward in biomedical research. ELISA assays are so valuable that they are still used today in many fields, including antibody development and screening. Yet, ...

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Medical Marijuana MEDICAL MARIJUANA

infographic

Feb 22, 2019

The marijuana (cannabis) plant has been used for recreational and medicinal purposes for more than 4,000 years. It was introduced to modern medicine in 1830 but banned as an illegal drug in 1970. Many studies have shown that the cannabinoids, the act...

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World Yoga Day: Finding the OM in GenOMics WORLD YOGA DAY: FINDING THE OM IN GENOMICS

blog article

Feb 22, 2019

A recent climb in the number of people taking up a regular yoga or meditation practice has seen the terms “downward dog” and “tree pose” enter the everyday vocabulary of many. Today, on World Yoga Day, people come together acr...

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Modelling for policy-driven schistosomiasis questions: Informing treatment guidelines, and monitoring and evaluation activities MODELLING FOR POLICY-DRIVEN SCHISTOSOMIASIS QUESTIONS: INFORMING TREATMENT GUIDELINES, AND MONITORING AND EVALUATION ACTIVITIES

blog article

Feb 22, 2019

Mathematical models can guide and inform public health policies and treatment strategies. Current research by the NTD Modelling Consortium has provided insights into the World Health Organization's guidelines for the control and elimination of sc...

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Emerging Technologies in Combating Foodborne Illness EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN COMBATING FOODBORNE ILLNESS

blog article

Feb 22, 2019

The World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated that in 2010 alone, 600 million cases of foodborne illnesses occurred globally resulting in 420,000 deaths. Other annual estimates place these numbers even higher. The majority of such cases are due t...

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The unexpected dangers of gum disease THE UNEXPECTED DANGERS OF GUM DISEASE

blog article

Feb 22, 2019

Gum disease is common and unpleasant, but, according to a growing body of evidence, it could also play a role in a surprising range of seemingly unrelated health problems. Plaque a sticky substance that contains bacteria builds up on teeth. If it is ...

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Genetic Defect Linked to Pediatric Liver Disease GENETIC DEFECT LINKED TO PEDIATRIC LIVER DISEASE

blog article

Feb 22, 2019

Researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, in collaboration with several other institutions, have discovered a genetic defect linked to Biliary atresia (BA), the most common pediatric cause of end-stage liver disease, and th...

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Taking a BiTE out of lung cancer TAKING A BITE OUT OF LUNG CANCER

blog article

Feb 22, 2019

Researchers at Osaka University in Japan have revealed a correlation between the action of T-cells in tumors, where they kill cancer cells, and in T-cells in the blood of these patients. T-cells are key components in the fight against cancer when it ...

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MRI sensor to image activity deep inside the brain MRI SENSOR TO IMAGE ACTIVITY DEEP INSIDE THE BRAIN

blog article

Feb 22, 2019

Calcium is a critical signaling molecule for most cells, and it is especially important in neurons. Imaging calcium in brain cells can reveal how neurons communicate with each other; however, current imaging techniques can only penetrate a few millim...

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How Chemical Phthalates are Endangering Women and Infants HOW CHEMICAL PHTHALATES ARE ENDANGERING WOMEN AND INFANTS

blog article

Feb 21, 2019

Chemical phthalates and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are showing up in extremely frightening places: diapers and sanitary pads. I’ve blogged about phthalates before.  These chemicals are found in many consumer products, including cosm...

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Gene in Infamous Experiment on Embryos Points to New Stroke Treatment GENE IN INFAMOUS EXPERIMENT ON EMBRYOS POINTS TO NEW STROKE TREATMENT

blog article

Feb 21, 2019

A widely criticized experiment last year saw a researcher in China delete a gene in twin girls at the embryonic stage in an attempt to protect them from HIV. A new study suggests that using a drug to delete the same gene in people with stroke or trau...

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Digital Twins in Healthcare DIGITAL TWINS IN HEALTHCARE

whitepaper

Feb 21, 2019

In this paper, you will learn how far we have come in generating massive amounts of patient data, but how unprepared we are to make use of it. A digital twin promises an outcome-driven approach to handling the data deluge arising from the patient&rsq...

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Big Food and Non-Profits Are Promoting Organic Conversion, So Why Aren’t There More Organic-Focused Technologies? BIG FOOD AND NON-PROFITS ARE PROMOTING ORGANIC CONVERSION, SO WHY AREN’T THERE MORE ORGANIC-FOCUSED TECHNOLOGIES?

blog article

Feb 21, 2019

Organic grain production in the US is not growing fast enough, according to a new report from the US Organic Grain Collaboration in partnership with the Organic Trade Association. The amount of US farmland devoted to the production of organic corn, s...

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Improving Care Quality with Patient Engagement IMPROVING CARE QUALITY WITH PATIENT ENGAGEMENT

infographic

Feb 21, 2019

Healthcare leaders should strategically distribute work among different care team members to enrich the end-to-end care experience of patients, according to a new infographic by Innovaccer. The infographic examines patient engagement trends and the i...

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Everything You Need to Know About Eggs EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT EGGS

infographic

Feb 21, 2019

A natural source of high-quality protein, eggs is a staple in many diets and one of the most logged foods on MyFitnessPal. They have been shown to help with weight loss in addition to promoting brain and eye health. Eggs can be enjoyed in a variety o...

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World Cancer Day Colombia WORLD CANCER DAY COLOMBIA

video

Feb 21, 2019

Roche Colombia colleagues joined the commemoration of World Cancer Day and shared a message about their daily actions to prevent and fight against cancer. We innovate in solutions that improve people's lives so they can live more moments that mak...

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Through my eyes: Opiate addiction THROUGH MY EYES: OPIATE ADDICTION

blog article

Feb 21, 2019

McDonough, GA, one of those "easy to forget" and "hard to spot on the map" rural towns. It is also the place I called home. I was the stereotypical "Georgia Peach." Living away from the city, I was fascinated by the simp...

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Why sleep is good for your arteries WHY SLEEP IS GOOD FOR YOUR ARTERIES

blog article

Feb 21, 2019

Fresh evidence suggests that sleep regulates a mechanism that can help to protect arteries from hardening. The finding reinforces the notion that good-quality sleep is important for cardiovascular health. Scientists from Massachusetts General Ho...

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Gene therapy to reduce deafness in mice GENE THERAPY TO REDUCE DEAFNESS IN MICE

blog article

Feb 21, 2019

In collaboration with the universities of Miami, Columbia and San Francisco, scientists from the Institut Pasteur, Inserm, CNRS, Collège de France, Sorbonne University and the University of Clermont Auvergne have managed to restore hearing in ...

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16 Proven Ways to Build More Muscle 16 PROVEN WAYS TO BUILD MORE MUSCLE

blog article

Feb 21, 2019

Strength training has been shown to build muscle and improve bone density, two things that promote good health, longevity, and mobility as you age. So, if you’re not already focused on building more muscle, now’s the time to start. You do...

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Is Off-the-Shelf Immunotherapy the Way Forward? IS OFF-THE-SHELF IMMUNOTHERAPY THE WAY FORWARD?

blog article

Feb 21, 2019

Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are engineered receptors that can be expressed on the T cell surface, that enhance the T cell’s ability to recognize and destroy cancer cells. This approach is known as CAR T therapy, which has shown promise in...

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This Japanese plant could hold the key to extended youth THIS JAPANESE PLANT COULD HOLD THE KEY TO EXTENDED YOUTH

blog article

Feb 21, 2019

In Japan, many have long believed that a plant called ashitaba is important in supporting a person's health and well-being. Now, researchers are suggesting that a compound in this plant boosts cellular health and may prolong youth. Part of t...

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Fighting HIV using anti-cancer immunotherapy FIGHTING HIV USING ANTI-CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY

blog article

Feb 21, 2019

Researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) have shown that immunotherapy treatments against cancer could reduce the amount of virus that persists in people on triple therapy. The study revealed how these therapies rev...

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OF VAMPIRES AND VILLAINS AND THOSE WHO ARE NOT OF VAMPIRES AND VILLAINS AND THOSE WHO ARE NOT

blog article

Feb 20, 2019

A genetic condition that causes victims to crave blood and resemble vampires has been the stuff of myths for centuries. Here’s what science tells us it really is. When Faust seals his pact with the devil, Goethe lets Mephistopheles state: &ldqu...

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Experts Debate: Is There Such a Thing as Too Much Protein? EXPERTS DEBATE: IS THERE SUCH A THING AS TOO MUCH PROTEIN?

infographic

Feb 20, 2019

Not only is protein an important component of every single cell in your body, but you also use the macronutrient to build and repair tissues (hugely important post-exercise) and make enzymes, hormones and other bodily chemicals. The recommended dieta...

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Things to remember when a parent has bipolar disorder THINGS TO REMEMBER WHEN A PARENT HAS BIPOLAR DISORDER

blog article

Feb 20, 2019

Bipolar disorder is a psychiatric condition that can disrupt a person's life and ability to function. As a close relative of someone with bipolar disorder, there are things to keep in mind when interacting with them. Living with a person who has ...

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How do baby flutters feel? HOW DO BABY FLUTTERS FEEL?

blog article

Feb 20, 2019

One of the most exciting moments of pregnancy for many women is feeling the baby move for the first time. Often, it can be difficult for a woman to distinguish these first movements from other sensations, such as indigestion or gas. However, when a w...

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Bacteria living on insects could provide new antibiotics BACTERIA LIVING ON INSECTS COULD PROVIDE NEW ANTIBIOTICS

blog article

Feb 20, 2019

Many antibiotics in use today came from bacteria that live in soil. Now, recent research reveals that bacteria that live on insects could be more effective at fighting common drug-resistant superbugs than bacteria from soil. Scientists at the Un...

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How the immune cell ‘Iron Man’ helps T-cells fight infection HOW THE IMMUNE CELL ‘IRON MAN’ HELPS T-CELLS FIGHT INFECTION

blog article

Feb 20, 2019

The immune system’s killer T-cells are crucial in fighting viral infections. A fraction of them, called ‘memory cells’, live on once infection is controlled in order to fight re-infection by the same virus. They are of great interes...

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Digital Manufacturing Of Biologics DIGITAL MANUFACTURING OF BIOLOGICS

whitepaper

Feb 19, 2019

The digital revolution in manufacturing began with an explosion in monitoring, analytics, and new computing capabilities. Combined with advances such as artificial intelligence (AI), automation, and robotics, digital is changing manufacturing concept...

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Cell Metabolism and Cancer CELL METABOLISM AND CANCER

blog article

Feb 19, 2019

It’s almost 100 years since Otto Warburg’s observation that cancer cells metabolize glucose in a manner that is distinct from that of cells in normal tissues. Yet, we still don’t fully understand why. In the years since significant ...

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We May Have Just Unlocked a Secret to How Life Started on Earth WE MAY HAVE JUST UNLOCKED A SECRET TO HOW LIFE STARTED ON EARTH

video

Feb 19, 2019

Scientists have been trying to piece together the chemical recipe for how the building blocks of life originated. Now, they may have found it.

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Single CRISPR Treatment Provides Long-Term Benefits In Mice SINGLE CRISPR TREATMENT PROVIDES LONG-TERM BENEFITS IN MICE

blog article

Feb 19, 2019

Researchers at Duke University have shown that a single systemic treatment using CRISPR genome editing technology can safely and stably correct a genetic disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) for more than a year in mice, despite observed immune ...

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New stem cells could be NEW STEM CELLS COULD BE 'UNIVERSALLY TRANSPLANTED'

blog article

Feb 19, 2019

Transplants are often a point of crisis, since there is a global shortage of donated organs, but also because there is a high risk that the receiver's body will reject the donated organ or transplanted tissue. A new type of "universal" ...

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CRISPR Gene Editing Makes Stem Cells ‘Invisible’ To Immune System CRISPR GENE EDITING MAKES STEM CELLS ‘INVISIBLE’ TO IMMUNE SYSTEM

blog article

Feb 19, 2019

UC San Francisco scientists have used the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing system to create the first pluripotent stem cells that are functionally “invisible” to the immune system, a feat of biological engineering that, in laboratory studies, pre...

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Neuromelanin-sensitive MRI could measure biomarker for psychosis NEUROMELANIN-SENSITIVE MRI COULD MEASURE BIOMARKER FOR PSYCHOSIS

blog article

Feb 19, 2019

Scientists, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) have shown that neuromelanin-sensitive MRI (NM-MRI) could be a potential biomarker for psychosis. NM-MRI signal was found to be a marker of dopamine function in people with schizoph...

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Top 11 Healthcare Trends for 2019 TOP 11 HEALTHCARE TRENDS FOR 2019

infographic

Feb 18, 2019

The 2019 Healthcare Leadership Intelligence Survey reveals the demand for experienced healthcare executives has never been higher as organizations seek leaders who can navigate a wide range of challenges. Many executives are viewing these challenges ...

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Fostering Innovation in Healthcare FOSTERING INNOVATION IN HEALTHCARE

whitepaper

Feb 18, 2019

In order to compete in today’s challenging healthcare landscape, health systems must leverage new and innovative models of care delivery. The U.S. Advisory Committee on Measuring Innovation in the 21st Century Economy defines innovation as &ldq...

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Genomic selection: methods in crop and animal breeding GENOMIC SELECTION: METHODS IN CROP AND ANIMAL BREEDING

blog article

Feb 18, 2019

Genomic selection: 6 factors to consider when choosing between targeted GBS and microarrays Genomic selection through genotyping is more accurate than conventional breeding methods and promises to revolutionize crop and animal breeding. Gel-based tec...

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Genome Biology at Genome Informatics GENOME BIOLOGY AT GENOME INFORMATICS

blog article

Feb 18, 2019

Genome Informatics is an annual conference, focusing on computational approaches for understanding the biology of genomes. It alternates between the Wellcome Trust conference center in Hinxton, UK and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories, NY, USA. Last ye...

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Gene Connection To Age-Related Cognitive Decline Confirmed In Mouse Study GENE CONNECTION TO AGE-RELATED COGNITIVE DECLINE CONFIRMED IN MOUSE STUDY

blog article

Feb 18, 2019

Why are some individuals at increased risk for age‐related cognitive decline and eventual dementia? Studies suggest up to 60 to 70 percent of the variation observed in cognitive abilities during aging are attributable to genetic factors. In an NIA-fu...

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Uncovering A ‘Smoking Gun’ Of Biological Aging UNCOVERING A ‘SMOKING GUN’ OF BIOLOGICAL AGING

blog article

Feb 18, 2019

A newly discovered ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clock can be used to accurately determine an individual’s chronological and biological age, according to research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The ribosomal clock is a novel biomarker...

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New cell-tracking technique sheds light on breast cancer spread NEW CELL-TRACKING TECHNIQUE SHEDS LIGHT ON BREAST CANCER SPREAD

blog article

Feb 18, 2019

A leading-edge genetic technique that can track cell lineage has revealed much about how breast cancer spreads. It could also help explain why some breast cancers relapse after initially successful chemotherapy. The name of the technique is cellular ...

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Why antibiotics fail in the fight against bacteria WHY ANTIBIOTICS FAIL IN THE FIGHT AGAINST BACTERIA

blog article

Feb 18, 2019

Bacteria that are immune to the action of antibiotics have become a primary concern for medical research communities across the world. A new study investigates what makes these "superbugs" resilient in the face of some of the most potent dr...

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Marijuana may be risky for those with heart disease MARIJUANA MAY BE RISKY FOR THOSE WITH HEART DISEASE

blog article

Feb 18, 2019

Although marijuana may have some benefits, its use could cause health issues for older people with cardiovascular disease. One case, in particular, is sparking some questions. In recent years, the legalization of marijuana has become more widespread....

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Parkinson PARKINSON'S: HOW STEM CELLS CAN HELP REPAIR THE BRAIN

blog article

Feb 18, 2019

New research examines the potential of stem cell therapy in the replacement of damaged neurons in Parkinson's disease. The authors say that stem cells could "provide superior treatment, possibly using different types of cells to treat differ...

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Screening for Disease Markers Using Non-Invasive Breath Gas Analysis SCREENING FOR DISEASE MARKERS USING NON-INVASIVE BREATH GAS ANALYSIS

whitepaper

Feb 18, 2019

Over the last few years, a developing field of research has emerged in breath gas analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This technique is non-invasive and has a number of possible applications, including monitoring of metabolic processes, th...

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Does Shaving Make Your Hair Thicker? DOES SHAVING MAKE YOUR HAIR THICKER?

video

Feb 16, 2019

You've probably heard someone explain that hair grows in thicker after shaving, but is there any truth to this or is it just a myth?

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Exercise boosts well-being by improving gut health EXERCISE BOOSTS WELL-BEING BY IMPROVING GUT HEALTH

blog article

Feb 16, 2019

Both bacterial diversity in the gut and regular exercise are important when it comes to health. But how are the two related? A new study uncovers the effect that exercise has on our health by adjusting the balance of the gut microbiome. Though t...

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Whole-genome sequencing can control the spread of foodborne bacteria WHOLE-GENOME SEQUENCING CAN CONTROL THE SPREAD OF FOODBORNE BACTERIA

blog article

Feb 16, 2019

Employing advanced genetic-tracing techniques and sharing the data produced in real time could limit the spread of bacteria Bacillus cereus which causes foodborne illness, according to researchers who implemented whole-genome sequencing of a pathogen...

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Respectful maternity care – the way forward RESPECTFUL MATERNITY CARE – THE WAY FORWARD

blog article

Feb 15, 2019

Despite the recent publication of the Respectful Maternity Care Charter, reports of disrespect and abuse in maternity care continue to be common in low-resource settings. A new paper in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth explores the perception and underst...

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Inflammation in midlife hastens cognitive decline INFLAMMATION IN MIDLIFE HASTENS COGNITIVE DECLINE

blog article

Feb 15, 2019

As we age, we may experience a decline in our mental ability. A recent study has concluded that chronic inflammation in midlife might speed up this decline as we get older. The average age of the population of the United States is gradually increasin...

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GMO Labels: What You Need to Know GMO LABELS: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

blog article

Feb 15, 2019

The labeling of our food has been a conversation for several decades. Whether it’s nutritional facts, ingredient lists, marketing claims, or how appealing one label looks over another, food labels are of interest to almost everyone. Lately, the...

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Reprogramming stem cells using the measles virus vector REPROGRAMMING STEM CELLS USING THE MEASLES VIRUS VECTOR

blog article

Feb 15, 2019

Researchers have developed a method to use the measles virus vector to reprogram pluripotent stem cells. Induced pluripotent stem cells begin as differentiated cells which are then reprogrammed to pluripotent stem cells through exposure to a complex ...

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Keys to Better Liquid Biopsy Assay Sensitivity KEYS TO BETTER LIQUID BIOPSY ASSAY SENSITIVITY

blog article

Feb 14, 2019

“So as everyone here is aware, I’m sure, detection of circulating tumor DNA is challenging. There’s very little of it, to start with.” Hardly a revolutionary statement by Tony Godfrey, Ph.D., (Associate Chair, Surgical Researc...

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Maternal Mortality MATERNAL MORTALITY

video

Feb 14, 2019

Pfizer’s Chief Patient Officer, Dr. Freda Lewis-Hall discusses the rise in maternal mortality rates in the United States.

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Elephant genes suppress tumours. Could studying this help us prevent cancer? ELEPHANT GENES SUPPRESS TUMOURS. COULD STUDYING THIS HELP US PREVENT CANCER?

blog article

Feb 14, 2019

The genetics and aging rate of elephants could hold clues to helping us find better ways to fight cancer and lead to healthier, longer lives. In 2015, 1.3 million people died from cancer in the EU, more than one-quarter of the total number of deaths ...

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From Anti-Venoms to Fertilizers, the Immense Potential for Microbes and Gene-Editing FROM ANTI-VENOMS TO FERTILIZERS, THE IMMENSE POTENTIAL FOR MICROBES AND GENE-EDITING

blog article

Feb 14, 2019

Microbes, or microscopic organisms, are being used today to combat diseases, improve sustainability, provide consumers with products that align with their values, and much more. With the continued advancement of biotechnology and development of gene-...

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Reducing diabetes risk with a personalized diet REDUCING DIABETES RISK WITH A PERSONALIZED DIET

blog article

Feb 14, 2019

Keeping blood glucose at a healthy level reduces the risk of developing diabetes. But until now, reducing high glucose levels has focused on limiting carb and calorie intake, rather than on how individuals respond to different foods. The number of pe...

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Reversible antiplatelet therapy fights cancer metastasis and clotting REVERSIBLE ANTIPLATELET THERAPY FIGHTS CANCER METASTASIS AND CLOTTING

blog article

Feb 14, 2019

Researchers have developed a reversible, antiplatelet therapy that may be able to reduce the risk of blood clots and could prevent cancer metastasis. The team modified human platelets to create ‘decoys’ that were capable to binding to som...

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Frequently Asked Questions About Genetic Testing FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT GENETIC TESTING

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Feb 13, 2019

Genetic testing uses laboratory methods to look at your genes, which are the DNA instructions you inherit from your mother and your father. Genetic tests may be used to identify increased risks of health problems, to choose treatments, or to assess r...

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Upcycling plastic bags into battery parts UPCYCLING PLASTIC BAGS INTO BATTERY PARTS

video

Feb 13, 2019

Researchers reporting in ACS Omega have developed a new approach to upcycle plastic bags into battery parts. ACS Headline Science shows how the inexpensive new method could help convert plastic waste into useful carbon-containing materials.

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Development of a gel for liver cell culture on microchips DEVELOPMENT OF A GEL FOR LIVER CELL CULTURE ON MICROCHIPS

blog article

Feb 13, 2019

Researchers have developed a new method to develop hydrogels that have similar properties to the natural environment of cells in the human body. Scientists at Linköping University have produced these hydrated materials, adapting them to the vari...

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Governance in Healthcare: Seen as a Business Capability GOVERNANCE IN HEALTHCARE: SEEN AS A BUSINESS CAPABILITY

blog article

Feb 12, 2019

Related to the trend of recognizing the difference between information and data, content, and knowledge is that governance of information requires it to be viewed as a business capability. This recognition is starting to take hold because healthcare ...

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Organoid Technologies in Research ORGANOID TECHNOLOGIES IN RESEARCH

video

Feb 12, 2019

An organoid is a three-dimensional construct composed of multiple cell types that originates from stem cells through self-organization and can simulate the architecture and functionality of native organs. This article reviews the common platforms of ...

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Plant Protein vs. Animal Protein: Which is Better? PLANT PROTEIN VS. ANIMAL PROTEIN: WHICH IS BETTER?

blog article

Feb 12, 2019

Let the official showdown begin! Whether you call it vegan, flexitarian or just plant-based eating, opting for non-animal sources of protein continues to be trendy. And numerous health advocates claim that plant-based proteins may be better for your ...

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What is the most effective intervention for ensuring weight recording in pregnancy? WHAT IS THE MOST EFFECTIVE INTERVENTION FOR ENSURING WEIGHT RECORDING IN PREGNANCY?

blog article

Feb 12, 2019

Following weight gain guidelines has been shown to improve pregnancy and birth outcomes for women and their babies, but adherence is low. A new paper in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth brings evidence of healthcare system-wide interventions that increas...

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Sugar: 7 new shocking truths revealed about the sweet poison SUGAR: 7 NEW SHOCKING TRUTHS REVEALED ABOUT THE SWEET POISON

infographic

Feb 12, 2019

Birthdays, weddings, anniversary, or your promotion– every event is inherently associated with sugary treats. We have unknowingly developed the tendency of celebrating happy occasions with sweet foods. Sweet treats have a strange way of seducin...

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Ultraprocessed foods may increase death risk ULTRAPROCESSED FOODS MAY INCREASE DEATH RISK

blog article

Feb 12, 2019

According to one large new study, eating more ultra-processed foods such as sugary drinks and ready-made meals increases the risk of all-cause mortality. There has never been a closer eye watching the average diet of people in the United States than ...

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How CRISPR Changes Human DNA Forever HOW CRISPR CHANGES HUMAN DNA FOREVER

video

Feb 11, 2019

A Chinese scientist claims to have created the world’s first genetically-engineered babies. He used CRISPR, a revolutionary gene-editing technology, to deactivate a gene in their DNA linked to HIV infection. Editing human DNA in this way could ...

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RNA-seq in Neuroscience RNA-SEQ IN NEUROSCIENCE

infographic

Feb 11, 2019

Sometimes, analyzing our DNA sequences isn’t quite enough. RNA-Seq is a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based technique that looks at the RNA transcripts produced from our DNA, allowing us to look into how our genes are expressed. RNA-Seq...

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Cell Therapy Logistics CELL THERAPY LOGISTICS

whitepaper

Feb 11, 2019

Much of the discussion in the cell therapy industry today focuses on the complexity of manufacturing and the unique characteristics of each dose. However, the ultimate success of a cell therapy clinical trial rests on the ability to deliver a viable,...

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What Is A Genetically-Engineered CRISPR Baby? WHAT IS A GENETICALLY-ENGINEERED CRISPR BABY?

video

Feb 11, 2019

A Chinese scientist claims to have created the world’s first genetically-engineered babies. He used CRISPR, a revolutionary gene-editing technology, to deactivate a gene in their DNA linked to HIV infection. Editing human DNA in this way could ...

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Stem cells converted into insulin-producing cells STEM CELLS CONVERTED INTO INSULIN-PRODUCING CELLS

video

Feb 11, 2019

Despite advances in the differentiation of insulin-producing cells from human embryonic stem cells, the generation of mature functional β cells in vitro has remained elusive. To accomplish this goal, we have developed cell culture conditions to ...

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Genomic approach to studying widespread malaria GENOMIC APPROACH TO STUDYING WIDESPREAD MALARIA

blog article

Feb 11, 2019

Scientists at the Institute of Genome Sciences (IGS) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have developed a novel way with genome sequences to study and better understand transmission, treat and ultimately eradicate Plasmodium viva...

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Science DNA Video SCIENCE DNA VIDEO

video

Feb 10, 2019

We needed to find a graphic style to communicate the beauty and intricacy of DNA. We wanted to create nostalgia; taking the audience back to the days of textbook diagrams and old science documentaries, such as Carl Sagan's COSMOS and IBM's PO...

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Harnessing the Power of Sound to Optimize Metagenomic Sequencing Library Prep HARNESSING THE POWER OF SOUND TO OPTIMIZE METAGENOMIC SEQUENCING LIBRARY PREP

blog article

Feb 09, 2019

There’s no doubt about it: Manual library preparation is tedious. It can hold up sequencing projects and contribute a great deal to their costs. Traditional liquid handlers may provide some relief in terms of labor, but they can still strain th...

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Diversity And Inclusion In A Scientific Context DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION IN A SCIENTIFIC CONTEXT

blog article

Feb 08, 2019

You have probably already heard of diversity and inclusion, but isn’t this just another management term? No, not this time! I hope I can convince you that there is real magic in inclusion and embracing diversity. I will introduce you to the wor...

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Bigger CRISPR- Cas12a toolbox, wider genomic coverage and higher targeting efficiencies BIGGER CRISPR- CAS12A TOOLBOX, WIDER GENOMIC COVERAGE AND HIGHER TARGETING EFFICIENCIES

blog article

Feb 08, 2019

Recently published research in Genome Biology identifies several new CRISPR-Cas12a loci, a type of CRISPR-Cas system for editing mammalian genomes. Here, two of the authors of the paper, Wei Li and Fei Teng, tell us about their research and how it en...

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Optimizing Process Efficiency In Upstream Manufacturing OPTIMIZING PROCESS EFFICIENCY IN UPSTREAM MANUFACTURING

whitepaper

Feb 08, 2019

Process efficiency is a key goal for biopharmaceutical production, focused on increasing the process' speed, keeping costs under control, and building flexibility into the process, all while maintaining the quality of the final product. In this a...

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Functional transplantable B-cells generated from mice FUNCTIONAL TRANSPLANTABLE B-CELLS GENERATED FROM MICE

blog article

Feb 08, 2019

Functional B1-cells that have been derived from mouse embryonic stem cells have been found to be capable of long-term engraftment as they secrete natural antibodies after transplantation. Scientists were interested in B1-cells generated from pluripot...

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Humble Beginnings: The Origin Story of Modern Biotechnology HUMBLE BEGINNINGS: THE ORIGIN STORY OF MODERN BIOTECHNOLOGY

blog article

Feb 07, 2019

The history of modern biotechnology began around four decades ago, with the invention of genetic engineering. In this piece, we explore the story of how Genentech, one of the fundamental companies of this field, helped to set many trends for modern b...

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Chronically Inflamed, then Never the Same/ Cell CHRONICALLY INFLAMED, THEN NEVER THE SAME/ CELL

video

Feb 07, 2019

During celiac disease, chronic inflammation permanently reshapes the immune cells residing in the intestinal epithelium, and the lost cells are not even recovered after a long-term gluten-free diet.

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FISH Probes Approved for Targeted Genome Analysis in Cancer FISH PROBES APPROVED FOR TARGETED GENOME ANALYSIS IN CANCER

blog article

Feb 07, 2019

Oxford Gene Technology (OGT) recently announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted de novo classification for eight Cytocell Aquarius® Haematology fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for myelodysplastic syndro...

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How does smoking marijuana affect sperm? HOW DOES SMOKING MARIJUANA AFFECT SPERM?

blog article

Feb 07, 2019

With the increased legalization of cannabis, especially medical marijuana, researchers are interested in finding out more about its effects on health. One area that is currently under exploration is that of marijuana's effect on fertility. A...

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Does education really protect against dementia? DOES EDUCATION REALLY PROTECT AGAINST DEMENTIA?

blog article

Feb 07, 2019

For years, many experts have assumed that spending more time in education protects against dementia. The latest study may overturn this long-held theory. It will have escaped no one's attention that dementia is on the rise. The most common type o...

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What is RNA? WHAT IS RNA?

blog article

Feb 07, 2019

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a complex molecule that is primarily found within the nucleus of cells. DNA is present within all living organisms and contains the genetic instructions required for the development and maintenance of life. The nucleic ...

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The role of immune cells in metastasis THE ROLE OF IMMUNE CELLS IN METASTASIS

blog article

Feb 07, 2019

Scientists have identified the processes used by specific cells to metastasize, and methods of blocking the action.  Researchers at the University of Basel and the University Hospital of Basel investigated how tumor cells use a specific type of ...

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How Biotech Is Changing The Way We Make Clothes HOW BIOTECH IS CHANGING THE WAY WE MAKE CLOTHES

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

The fashion industry is seeing the beginnings of a biotechnological revolution where living beings are being used to make clothing, resulting in improved and more sustainable materials. Biotechnology already plays an important role in the textile ind...

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Harnessing AI in a Battle Against Aging HARNESSING AI IN A BATTLE AGAINST AGING

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

A recently announced collaboration between Juvenescence AI, Ltd., a drug development company focused on combating aging and age-related diseases, and NetraMark Corp., which leverages machine learning algorithms to give new life to failing drugs, has ...

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The Booming Business of Neurotoxin Therapy THE BOOMING BUSINESS OF NEUROTOXIN THERAPY

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

During last month’s TOXINS 2019 conference in Copenhagen, Ipsen revealed the results of their first-in-human trial assessing the safety and tolerability of its rBoNT-E compound, a recombinant neurotoxin based on the botulinum toxin serotype E. ...

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What is Forensic Toxicology? WHAT IS FORENSIC TOXICOLOGY?

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

The most common sample types used by forensic toxicologists are blood, urine, and hair, as these can be easily collected in a non-invasive manner and provide a great deal of information regarding both the historical and present influence of various s...

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Are we ARE WE 'APPROACHING AN ERA WHERE NO ANTIBIOTICS WORK?'

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

Researchers are worried about the fast development and spread of "superbugs," which are bacteria that do not respond to antibiotics. For the first time, scientists have found potent superbugs in the remote High Arctic of Norway, which they ...

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Biosimilar Surge Driving Need for Antibody Characterization BIOSIMILAR SURGE DRIVING NEED FOR ANTIBODY CHARACTERIZATION

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

Accurate protein characterization is particularly important in the biopharmaceutical industry, where product modifications can affect efficacy and safety. In this two-part series, we speak to Matthew Lauber, a consulting scientist at Waters. Here, Ma...

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Newly Categorized Organs in the Human Body NEWLY CATEGORIZED ORGANS IN THE HUMAN BODY

video

Feb 06, 2019

A new organ has been discovered hiding in plain sight inside the human body. Known as the mesentery, it was previously thought to be just a few fragmented structures in the digestive system. But scientists have realized it is, in fact, one, continuou...

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Key function of specialised cells in peripheral nerve repair KEY FUNCTION OF SPECIALISED CELLS IN PERIPHERAL NERVE REPAIR

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

Scientists at the University of Plymouth highlighted a novel function of a cell in the immune system called a macrophage. These cells can be found in most tissues in the body. Here they are on the lookout for potentially harmful organisms, and if cau...

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BMC Nutrition: Editor picks of 2018 BMC NUTRITION: EDITOR PICKS OF 2018

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

Excessive sedentary time has been identified as a contributing factor to cardiovascular disease, but sedentary behavior is nevertheless becoming more common in the workplace. Alongside the adverse health effects associated with sedentary behavior, pr...

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Cannabinoid compounds may inhibit growth of colon cancer cells CANNABINOID COMPOUNDS MAY INHIBIT GROWTH OF COLON CANCER CELLS

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

Medical marijuana has gained attention in recent years for its potential to relieve pain and short-term anxiety and depression. Now, Penn State College of Medicine researchers say some cannabinoid compounds may actually inhibit the growth of colon ca...

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EXPLORING GENETIC VARIATION WITH SNP GENOTYPIN SNP GENOTYPING EXPLORING GENETIC VARIATION WITH SNP GENOTYPIN SNP GENOTYPING

infographic

Feb 05, 2019

Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are substitutions of one nucleotide at a precise location within a genome. To be classified as an SNP, a substitution must present at that location in at least 1% of the general population. There are over 660 mi...

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Light Scattering in Protein Aggregation Studies LIGHT SCATTERING IN PROTEIN AGGREGATION STUDIES

blog article

Feb 05, 2019

The past 15 years have seen a renewed dedication to quality by biopharmaceutical manufacturers and regulators. The U.S. FDA’s Quality by Design initiative, now well into its second decade, focuses on building quality into a process versus &ldqu...

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Upstream Bioprocessing In Food And Feed Applications UPSTREAM BIOPROCESSING IN FOOD AND FEED APPLICATIONS

whitepaper

Feb 05, 2019

Mix water and flour with a little yeast and incubate the dough in a warm place until its volume has approximately doubled“ – such household baking instructions will (or may not) produce a decent result, but are not what is needed in the i...

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The Spectacular World of Cancer Cell Imaging THE SPECTACULAR WORLD OF CANCER CELL IMAGING

whitepaper

Feb 05, 2019

Advances in imaging techniques have been instrumental in many aspects of cancer research; from screening and diagnosis to the guidance of cancer treatments and the monitoring of its recurrence. Insights provided by these advanced imaging techniques h...

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Genetic sequence can predict protein production efficiency GENETIC SEQUENCE CAN PREDICT PROTEIN PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY

blog article

Feb 05, 2019

Thousands of databases that include biological data are now publicly available and include data on gene and protein sequences and detailed measurements of different cellular parameters, such as the exact quantities of all proteins produced and degrad...

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Gut bacteria might influence depression, and this is how GUT BACTERIA MIGHT INFLUENCE DEPRESSION, AND THIS IS HOW

blog article

Feb 05, 2019

New research suggests a significant link between the health of the gut and its bacterial population and mental health. For the first time, scientists have explored this link in humans. They identified some of the possible culprits. Researchers are no...

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Mucus could be key to treating colon and airway diseases MUCUS COULD BE KEY TO TREATING COLON AND AIRWAY DISEASES

blog article

Feb 05, 2019

Cells produce mucins at a constant rate, and when exposed to an allergen or pathogen, they produce more mucin in a rapid burst. Both the constant and rapid mucin secretion is controlled by calcium. CRG researchers Dr. Gerard Cantero-Recasens and Prof...

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Achieving Competitive Advantage With Anatomy And Physiology ACHIEVING COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE WITH ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

whitepaper

Feb 04, 2019

This whitepaper explores how best in class anatomy, physiology and clinical content, images, and customized solutions enable organizations to achieve strong competitive advantage, drive credibility, productivity and differentiation. We will share ide...

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World Cancer Day 2019 WORLD CANCER DAY 2019

video

Feb 04, 2019

Over the last two decades, we’ve been developing medicines that offer meaningful benefits for people living with cancer. However, our work is far from done. We will continue innovating because we believe the work we do today can change the live...

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How a light-activated metal could destroy cancer cells HOW A LIGHT-ACTIVATED METAL COULD DESTROY CANCER CELLS

blog article

Feb 04, 2019

An innovative new approach to cancer therapy suggests that a compound of the metal iridium could when activated by the light, target and destroy cancer cells. At the moment, there are many different types of cancer treatment. These range from chemoth...

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How nanoparticles may drive the spread of cancer HOW NANOPARTICLES MAY DRIVE THE SPREAD OF CANCER

blog article

Feb 04, 2019

New research finds that some nanomaterials that scientists use to combat cancer may have the opposite effect: to help tumors spread. The results reveal why this might occur and propose a way for us to turn this risk into a therapeutic advantage. ...

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Lysin Therapy Offers New Hope For Fighting Drug-Resistant Bacteria LYSIN THERAPY OFFERS NEW HOPE FOR FIGHTING DRUG-RESISTANT BACTERIA

blog article

Feb 04, 2019

Humans are in a constant arms race with infectious bacteria. To kill these disease microbes, we develop powerful antibiotics; and in turn, the bacteria develop resistance against these drugs. So we enhance our antibiotics, and the bacteria enhance th...

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The path of metallodrugs in breast cancer cells THE PATH OF METALLODRUGS IN BREAST CANCER CELLS

blog article

Feb 04, 2019

The path a metallodrug uses to target and kill cancer cells could be used to design drugs to target triple-negative breast cancer. Scientists from numerous institutions collaborated to work on a metallorganic molecule to be used as an antitumor drug....

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Next-generation Gene Therapy Cassettes for Muscular Dystrophy NEXT-GENERATION GENE THERAPY CASSETTES FOR MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

blog article

Feb 04, 2019

Experimental gene therapy cassettes for Duchenne muscular dystrophy have been modified to deliver better performance. The cassettes, which carry the therapy into muscle cells, contain newer versions of a miniaturized treatment gene. The micro-dystrop...

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AI for Lung Cancer Diagnostics AI FOR LUNG CANCER DIAGNOSTICS

blog article

Feb 04, 2019

An intelligent software system for lung cancer diagnostics has been developed by researchers from Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU), Russian Academic Excellence Initiative participant, in collaboration with the radiologists...

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What Happens to Your Body After Death WHAT HAPPENS TO YOUR BODY AFTER DEATH

video

Feb 03, 2019

Decomposition begins several minutes after death with a process called autolysis, or self-digestion. Soon after the heart stops beating, cells become deprived of oxygen, and their acidity increases as the toxic by-products of chemical reactions begin...

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UV light could reduce hospital-acquired infections UV LIGHT COULD REDUCE HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED INFECTIONS

blog article

Feb 03, 2019

A new study shows that ultraviolet disinfection technology eliminates up to 97.7 percent of pathogens in the operating room. Using this light wavelength might help defeat superbugs. The study, published in the American Journal of Infection Contr...

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Cell Growth and Death CELL GROWTH AND DEATH

infographic

Feb 02, 2019

Concept 38 Development balances cell growth and death. In a biological sense, growth results from the reproduction of new cells from pre-existing ones, by the process of cell division (mitosis). Remarkably, normal development requires that some healt...

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Building a Healthy Immune System BUILDING A HEALTHY IMMUNE SYSTEM

blog article

Feb 02, 2019

We’ve all experienced the disappointment of having to put everything on hold when our bodies crash and our health deteriorates, usually just when we think we can least afford to slow down or take a break. Deep down, most of us know that there i...

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Cardiovascular deaths on the rise in the US CARDIOVASCULAR DEATHS ON THE RISE IN THE US

blog article

Feb 02, 2019

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), nearly half of all adults in the United States have cardiovascular disease. It caused more deaths in 2016 than previous years, despite rates of cardiovascular deaths have declined worldwide. Hea...

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How skin cancer becomes invasive HOW SKIN CANCER BECOMES INVASIVE

blog article

Feb 02, 2019

In a study on mouse models and human tissue, researchers have revealed how aggressive forms of skin cancer are able to co-opt the immune system to become invasive. Knowing this could lead to better, more effective treatments. New research, the f...

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Taking the High Out of Pain: Exploring Abuse-Deterrent Opioids and Opioid Alternatives TAKING THE HIGH OUT OF PAIN: EXPLORING ABUSE-DETERRENT OPIOIDS AND OPIOID ALTERNATIVES

infographic

Feb 01, 2019

With opioid abuse and deaths in the US at an all-time high, the journey to battle the opioid epidemic continues – keeping drug companies and the FDA working hard to come up with effective alternatives for pain. This insightful infographic break...

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The 7 wonders of poop THE 7 WONDERS OF POOP

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

Although it is not necessarily the most pleasant of topics, we must, at least, respect its ubiquity: poop is everywhere. In this Spotlight, we bring you some fascinating stool-based knowledge. Feces unites the entire animal kingdom. It is something w...

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Nanoparticles in food can alter the behavior of gut bacteria NANOPARTICLES IN FOOD CAN ALTER THE BEHAVIOR OF GUT BACTERIA

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

New research on nanoparticles in food has yielded fresh insights about their impact on gut bacteria. Researchers from the University Medical Center of Mainz in Germany and colleagues from other centers in Germany, Austria, and the United States ...

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Many Genes Increase Risk of Depression Diagnosis MANY GENES INCREASE RISK OF DEPRESSION DIAGNOSIS

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

In Denmark, 15.5 percent of woman and nine percent of men receive treatment for depression at a psychiatric hospital at some stage of their lives. Depression is a common but very serious condition which is very costly for both the individual and soci...

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Pros and Cons from Desalination PROS AND CONS FROM DESALINATION

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

Before the Carlsbad Desalination Plant in Southern California began operations in 2015, scientists at UC Santa Cruz recognized an important opportunity to study the effects of the high-salinity brine that would be discharged from the plant into coast...

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Hyperactive Brain Cells May Be to Blame When Antidepressants Don HYPERACTIVE BRAIN CELLS MAY BE TO BLAME WHEN ANTIDEPRESSANTS DON'T WORK

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

The most commonly prescribed antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), lift the fog of depression for many people. But for around a third of people with the major depressive disorder, SSRIs don’t make much of a differenc...

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Protocells Could Provide Clues on the Origins of Life PROTOCELLS COULD PROVIDE CLUES ON THE ORIGINS OF LIFE

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

Membraneless assemblies of positively and negatively-charged molecules can bring together RNA molecules in dense liquid droplets, allowing the RNAs to participate in fundamental chemical reactions. These assemblies, called "complex coacervates,&...

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Medical cannabis relieves symptoms in children with autism MEDICAL CANNABIS RELIEVES SYMPTOMS IN CHILDREN WITH AUTISM

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

In a new study of patients with autism who are 18 years old and under, researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Soroka University Medical Center report that cannabis as a treatment for autism spectrum disorders appears to be a we...

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Immune regulators respond to parasite infections IMMUNE REGULATORS RESPOND TO PARASITE INFECTIONS

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

A study has identified the master regulator that maintains a healthy gut and limits damage by parasitic whipworms. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and collaborators have revealed that the interleukin 10 receptor (IL-10R) is critical to...

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Inside View: Can a Community Invigorate Cancer Care? INSIDE VIEW: CAN A COMMUNITY INVIGORATE CANCER CARE?

blog article

Jan 31, 2019

Despite the advances in oncology research and care, cancer remains the world’s second leading cause of death. But Andrew Coop, the global medicines lead of the oncology business unit at AstraZeneca, hopes that his company might help to change t...

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Why We Use Food as an Energetic Buffer WHY WE USE FOOD AS AN ENERGETIC BUFFER

blog article

Jan 31, 2019

For as long as I can remember, my relationship with food has been complicated. On the one hand, I was super health conscious at an unusually young age fascinated by all the different schools of thought that were emerging about how best to eat for opt...

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Exploring the genome using transcription factors EXPLORING THE GENOME USING TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS

blog article

Jan 31, 2019

Transcription factors are proteins that regulate the transcription of genes, which is the first step in making a protein. The way they work is by searching the entire genome and binding to specific regions that regulate genes, turning them “on&...

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Identifying the biomedical potential of bivalves IDENTIFYING THE BIOMEDICAL POTENTIAL OF BIVALVES

blog article

Jan 31, 2019

Researchers have been studying shellfish, such as oysters and mussels, which may have the potential to revolutionize human health research. These creatures could help researchers investigate bone regeneration and aid pharmaceutical development. &ldqu...

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Flexible Aseptic Filling? It’s easier with Vanrx. FLEXIBLE ASEPTIC FILLING? IT’S EASIER WITH VANRX.

infographic

Jan 30, 2019

Many companies are considering flexible aseptic filling machines as they build manufacturing capacity for new injectable therapies. Vanrx was founded by biologics manufacturing experts, who designed a better filling machine. This is our view of your ...

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Pesticides and Food PESTICIDES AND FOOD

infographic

Jan 30, 2019

Information about pesticides is ubiquitous online. Unfortunately, a balanced and nuanced discussion about the benefits and drawbacks of current pesticides is difficult to find. This series discusses the main concerns surrounding pesticides and illumi...

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Short, regular movement breaks lower risk of early death SHORT, REGULAR MOVEMENT BREAKS LOWER RISK OF EARLY DEATH

blog article

Jan 30, 2019

Modern working life means that many people spend hours sitting down. However, researchers have recently found that even low-intensity exercise breaks have a significant impact on lifespan. We know that some form of exercise is needed to keep several ...

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Could stem cells reverse diabetes? COULD STEM CELLS REVERSE DIABETES?

blog article

Jan 30, 2019

Diabetes is manageable with proper care, but no cure is yet available. Some scientists believe that transforming stem cells into insulin-secreting cells might offer hope. A new study, which features in the journal Stem Cell Reports, highlights r...

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Engineered dl355 virus has the potential to be an effective anticancer treatment ENGINEERED DL355 VIRUS HAS THE POTENTIAL TO BE AN EFFECTIVE ANTICANCER TREATMENT

blog article

Jan 30, 2019

Hokkaido University researchers have engineered a virus that selectively targets and kills cancer cells. The virus, called dl355, has an even stronger anticancer effect than another engineered virus currently used in clinical practice. Molecular onco...

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Functional Genomic Screening: A Brief History FUNCTIONAL GENOMIC SCREENING: A BRIEF HISTORY

blog article

Jan 29, 2019

In April 2003, coinciding with the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the structure of DNA, the Human Genome Project was completed. Launched in 1990, the project sequenced the entirety of the human genome with 99.9% accuracy, and shortly afterward,...

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Bio Fuels BIO FUELS

infographic

Jan 29, 2019

it is the form of a fuel that contains energy the carbon fixation caused geologically. All biofuels are produced by living organisms, for instance, plants and microglae. The biofuels are made up by biomass conversion. This biomass can be converted to...

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Marijuana: Health Benefits and Risks MARIJUANA: HEALTH BENEFITS AND RISKS

video

Jan 29, 2019

The relaxing effects of marijuana are well known, so it’s not surprising that a 2016 paper in the journal Clinical Psychology Review concluded that it may have benefits for people with depression, social anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disor...

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Menopause: Mindfulness may reduce symptoms MENOPAUSE: MINDFULNESS MAY REDUCE SYMPTOMS

blog article

Jan 29, 2019

A recent study suggests that mindfulness may be a promising tool to help menopausal women struggling with irritability, anxiety, and depression. Several studies have found that mindfulness can help with good psychological health. The word "mindf...

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Could targeting this enzyme slow aging and related diseases? COULD TARGETING THIS ENZYME SLOW AGING AND RELATED DISEASES?

blog article

Jan 29, 2019

Investigating an enzyme that stops cells from dividing could be a fruitful avenue for research into how to slow aging and treat aging-related diseases. This was the conclusion that researchers at Kobe University in Japan came to after studying t...

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Cancer Cells Converted into Harmless Fat Cells in Mice CANCER CELLS CONVERTED INTO HARMLESS FAT CELLS IN MICE

video

Jan 29, 2019

Scientists in Switzerland say they've done just that, in a new study in mice. By taking advantage of the "plasticity," or adaptability, of certain cancer cells during metastasis, the researchers were able to coax breast cancer cells in ...

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Realizing the Potential of Top-down Proteomics REALIZING THE POTENTIAL OF TOP-DOWN PROTEOMICS

blog article

Jan 29, 2019

Having grown beyond early ‘proof-of-principle’ studies, top-down proteomics is now extensively used to analyze intact proteins in numerous applications. Here, we discuss how the top-down proteomics approach emerged, the reasons underpinni...

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Why sleep is the best painkiller WHY SLEEP IS THE BEST PAINKILLER

blog article

Jan 29, 2019

New research, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, finds that sleep deprivation increases sensitivity to pain by numbing the brain's painkilling response. One in 3 adults in the United States, or 35 percent of the adult population, do not ge...

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Can the tongue microbiome help diagnose pancreatic cancer? CAN THE TONGUE MICROBIOME HELP DIAGNOSE PANCREATIC CANCER?

blog article

Jan 29, 2019

Pancreatic cancer is typically an aggressive form of the disease, with a fairly low 5-year survival rate. Diagnosing pancreatic cancer in its early stages could help people receive treatment more quickly, but what kind of test would work best? T...

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Peptide research gives insight on tackling bacteria PEPTIDE RESEARCH GIVES INSIGHT ON TACKLING BACTERIA

blog article

Jan 29, 2019

Researchers have managed to pinpoint how a crucial step in the biosynthesis of antibiotics occur. A team of scientists, led by Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute‘s Associate Professor Max Cryle, have paved the way to potentially redesigning...

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5 Real-Life Technologies Where Biotech Meets Science Fiction 5 REAL-LIFE TECHNOLOGIES WHERE BIOTECH MEETS SCIENCE FICTION

blog article

Jan 28, 2019

From genetic engineering to synthetic food and immortality, biotech is getting surprisingly close to recreating science fiction in real life.  Science fiction is always a step ahead of real-life science. The genre imagined space travel, wireless...

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Antibody Cascade Design Key to Customizing Success ANTIBODY CASCADE DESIGN KEY TO CUSTOMIZING SUCCESS

blog article

Jan 28, 2019

Last November, Abcam’s Head of Customs Services, Jamie Campbell, presented at the PEGS (Protein & Antibody Engineering Summit) Europe conference in Lisbon, Portugal. We caught up with Jamie to get a rundown on his talk, which covered the co...

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These immune cells renew themselves after acute kidney injury THESE IMMUNE CELLS RENEW THEMSELVES AFTER ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

blog article

Jan 28, 2019

A new study in mice shows that some immune cells in the kidneys "renew" themselves after acute kidney injury, reaching a developmental state that is similar to that in newborns. The findings may help develop therapies that enable the kidney...

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‘Superbug Gene’ Found In One Of The Most Remote Places On Earth ‘SUPERBUG GENE’ FOUND IN ONE OF THE MOST REMOTE PLACES ON EARTH

blog article

Jan 28, 2019

Antibiotic-Resistant Genes (ARGs) that were first detected in urban India have been found 8,000 miles away in one of the last ‘pristine’ places on earth, a new study has shown. Soil samples taken in the Kongsfjorden region of Svalbard hav...

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FGL2 protein may be an effective target for GBM FGL2 PROTEIN MAY BE AN EFFECTIVE TARGET FOR GBM

blog article

Jan 28, 2019

Researchers have discovered an immune regulator that appears to dictate glioblastoma progression by shutting down immune surveillance. Researchers have discovered an immune regulator that appears to dictate glioblastoma (GBM) progression by shutting ...

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Antibiotics disrupt gut bacteria, impact bone health ANTIBIOTICS DISRUPT GUT BACTERIA, IMPACT BONE HEALTH

blog article

Jan 28, 2019

A new study about the side effects of antibiotic treatment reveals that it may dysregulate postpubertal skeletal development by interfering with gut bacteria. The trillions of bacteria living in our bodies are crucial for our health. They support the...

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The Crazy Plan to Deliver the First Baby in Space THE CRAZY PLAN TO DELIVER THE FIRST BABY IN SPACE

video

Jan 26, 2019

SpaceLife Origin, based in the Netherlands, wants to send a pregnant woman, accompanied by a ‘trained, world-class medical team,’ in a capsule to the space above Earth. The mission would last 24 to 36 hours. Once the woman delivered the c...

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Modified herpes virus effective against late-stage melanoma MODIFIED HERPES VIRUS EFFECTIVE AGAINST LATE-STAGE MELANOMA

blog article

Jan 26, 2019

A new treatment with a genetically modified herpes virus is effective against stage 3B and stage 4 melanoma, a recent human study confirms. In 2015, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of talimogene laherparepve...

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Recent Advances in Liquid Biopsy for Cancer RECENT ADVANCES IN LIQUID BIOPSY FOR CANCER

blog article

Jan 25, 2019

Liquid biopsies search for evidence of disease biomarkers in biological fluids, such as blood or cerebrospinal fluid. For cancer, these biomarkers most commonly include tumor-derived circulating tumor cells (CTCs), circulating cell-free nucleic acids...

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Tobacco Use In Adolescence Is Tied To Paranoia TOBACCO USE IN ADOLESCENCE IS TIED TO PARANOIA

blog article

Jan 25, 2019

Paranoia is associated with regular tobacco smoking in adolescents after accounting for other factors like cannabis use, sleep disturbances and stressful life events, reports a study recently published to the Journal of the American Academy of Child ...

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Variations in thyroid function could be linked to atrial fibrillation risk VARIATIONS IN THYROID FUNCTION COULD BE LINKED TO ATRIAL FIBRILLATION RISK

blog article

Jan 25, 2019

Results of a study have strengthened the link between thyroid function and atrial fibrillation (AF). Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center conducted the study that scanned the medical records of more than 37,000 people to identify any a...

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'GENETIC DICE ARE LOADED AGAINST' OBESE PEOPLE

blog article

Jan 25, 2019

Everyone who has tried to lose weight will be familiar with the frustration that often accompanies weight loss efforts. Sometimes, it may seem as though people who are overweight are fighting a losing battle, while slim people can eat whatever they w...

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How aspirin may benefit some people with head and neck cancer HOW ASPIRIN MAY BENEFIT SOME PEOPLE WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCER

blog article

Jan 25, 2019

Recent research has tied regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin, to longer survival in some people with head and neck cancer. The researchers propose that there should now be a clinical trial to test the effectivene...

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What The Keto Diet Actually Does To Your Body WHAT THE KETO DIET ACTUALLY DOES TO YOUR BODY

video

Jan 24, 2019

The ketogenic diet, or keto, has become a popular way to lose weight. The high-fat, low-carb diet is a drastic change from the diet that the USDA recommends for Americans. It’s also a huge change for your body’s metabolism.

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Gene Drive Feasible in Mammals, Not Just Insects GENE DRIVE FEASIBLE IN MAMMALS, NOT JUST INSECTS

blog article

Jan 24, 2019

All the trouble caused by the Pied Piper of Hamelin could have been avoided if only the villagers had access to gene drive technology. Until recently, such technology wasn’t available to us, either. Also, it has been limited to the control of i...

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Could hacking the immune system cure allergies? COULD HACKING THE IMMUNE SYSTEM CURE ALLERGIES?

blog article

Jan 24, 2019

Scientists are redesigning natural allergens to help the immune system defend against them, in a move that could eliminate the side effects and lifelong medication of treating allergies the most common chronic condition in Europe. More than 150 milli...

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DNA anticancer vaccine targets tumour neoantigens DNA ANTICANCER VACCINE TARGETS TUMOUR NEOANTIGENS

blog article

Jan 24, 2019

Researchers at The Wistar Institute have demonstrated that an optimized synthetic DNA vaccine platform could induce immunity against tumor neoantigens. During the progression of cancer, the cells undergo a vast number of genetic mutations which gener...

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Analyses of Large Proteins, Antibodies, and Modified Proteins Using A New Series of Advanced Large Pore HPLC Materials ANALYSES OF LARGE PROTEINS, ANTIBODIES, AND MODIFIED PROTEINS USING A NEW SERIES OF ADVANCED LARGE PORE HPLC MATERIALS

whitepaper

Jan 23, 2019

As pharmaceutical companies have shifted their development focus to large-molecule biotherapeutics, the ability to separate intact monoclonal antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates for characterization purposes have become extremely important. To en...

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NEGLECTED PLAYERS IN MICROBIOME RESEARCH NEGLECTED PLAYERS IN MICROBIOME RESEARCH

blog article

Jan 23, 2019

When microbiome research gained the attention of scientists, most of their efforts focused on bacterial populations. They neglected other microorganisms, such as phages and viruses. With renewed attention on phage therapy and advances in gene editing...

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Harmony (Non-Invasive Prenatal Test, NIPT) HARMONY (NON-INVASIVE PRENATAL TEST, NIPT)

video

Jan 23, 2019

These conditions can happen in any pregnancy- even when there is no family history- because they typically are not inherited. They happen by "chance", and although the chance increases with mother's age, most babies with chromosomal con...

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Having Stressed-Out Ancestors Improves Lizards’ Immune Response To Stress HAVING STRESSED-OUT ANCESTORS IMPROVES LIZARDS’ IMMUNE RESPONSE TO STRESS

blog article

Jan 23, 2019

Having ancestors who were frequently exposed to stressors can improve one’s own immune response to stressors, according to Penn State researchers who studied fence lizards and their stress response. The results suggest that family history shoul...

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Diversifying the CRISPR Toolbox DIVERSIFYING THE CRISPR TOOLBOX

blog article

Jan 22, 2019

The roughly half a dozen Cas9 enzymes are available for DNA editing scratch the surface of the panoply of Cas enzymes that exist in bacteria. Today, a team led by CRISPR co-discoverer Feng Zhang, PhD, professor of neuroscience at MIT, together with c...

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Identifying a Microbial Needle in a Sample Haystack IDENTIFYING A MICROBIAL NEEDLE IN A SAMPLE HAYSTACK

blog article

Jan 22, 2019

Swift and accurate detection of pathogens is desirable and, in some cases, essential to keep us from harm. In cases such as the food industry and water quality monitoring, preventing microbial contamination from reaching the consumer is key. Rapid de...

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Exploring the Tumor Microenvironment EXPLORING THE TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT

infographic

Jan 22, 2019

The tumor microenvironment (TME) consists of a complex and dynamic mixture of non-cancerous cells and molecules that surround the cancerous cells that comprise a tumor. Tumor cells can interact with the non-cancerous cells in the TME, meaning they ar...

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Stool transplants from STOOL TRANSPLANTS FROM 'SUPER DONORS' COULD BE A CURE-ALL

blog article

Jan 22, 2019

New research suggests that stools from so-called "super donors" have such rich microbial diversity that using them for fecal transplants could cure conditions ranging from inflammatory bowel disease to Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis...

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Common food additive may impact gut bacteria, increase anxiety COMMON FOOD ADDITIVE MAY IMPACT GUT BACTERIA, INCREASE ANXIETY

blog article

Jan 22, 2019

A wide range of foods contain ingredients that we call emulsifiers. A new study in mice shows that these compounds can produce both physiological and behavioral changes. Food additives have always generated a great deal of attention, and, rightl...

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Catching lung cancer early using molecular profiling CATCHING LUNG CANCER EARLY USING MOLECULAR PROFILING

blog article

Jan 22, 2019

Researchers have identified how they can differentiate between lesions in the airways that are benign and those that could become cancerous…Researchers have suggested that genetic sequencing of precancerous lung lesions could aid the early det...

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PHAGE THERAPY: BEAT THE SUPERBUGS AT THEIR OWN GAME PHAGE THERAPY: BEAT THE SUPERBUGS AT THEIR OWN GAME

blog article

Jan 21, 2019

The word “superbug” is a familiar term. We now know that the overuse of antibiotics has contributed to creating these tiny, life-threatening monsters. The hunt is on for new antibiotics to fight these superbugs, but it cannot completely r...

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Antibody Screening Tools; Improving Workflows ANTIBODY SCREENING TOOLS; IMPROVING WORKFLOWS

blog article

Jan 21, 2019

Helping researchers identify, characterize and investigate new antibody candidates fuels the growing demand for therapeutic antibodies. Please give an overview of the most important advancements in this field. Biologics, in particular, therapeutic mo...

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Changing DNA in a Cell With No DNA: Gene Therapy for Blood Disorders CHANGING DNA IN A CELL WITH NO DNA: GENE THERAPY FOR BLOOD DISORDERS

video

Jan 21, 2019

Lots of genetic diseases come down to a small change in a single gene, but how do you treat those diseases when the cells involved don’t have any DNA?

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A Renaissance for Microflow Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry? A RENAISSANCE FOR MICROFLOW LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY?

blog article

Jan 21, 2019

As precision medicine drives the development of more targeted drugs, demands are increasing for more complex biomarker analyses and so researchers are striving to develop new techniques that are robust, highly sensitive, and use ever-smaller sample v...

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Gene responsible for prostate cancer spread identified GENE RESPONSIBLE FOR PROSTATE CANCER SPREAD IDENTIFIED

blog article

Jan 21, 2019

Researchers have identified a specific gene that indicates that patients’ cancer is at high risk of spreading. The team mentioned that this particular gene could be the key to helping patients live longer lives. Scientists at Rutgers University...

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Scientists achieve the first stable simulations of DNA crystals SCIENTISTS ACHIEVE THE FIRST STABLE SIMULATIONS OF DNA CRYSTALS

blog article

Jan 21, 2019

Since the birth of structural biology, x-ray crystallography has been the most widely used technique to determine the three-dimensional structure of biomolecules—the chemical compounds found in living organisms. In this regard, knowledge of the...

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How gut bacteria affect the treatment of Parkinson’s disease HOW GUT BACTERIA AFFECT THE TREATMENT OF PARKINSON’S DISEASE

blog article

Jan 21, 2019

Patients with Parkinson’s disease are treated with levodopa, which is converted into dopamine, a neurotransmitter in the brain, scientists from the University of Groningen show that gut bacteria can metabolize levodopa into dopamine. As dopamin...

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‘Hidden pocket’ could be targeted to treat strokes ‘HIDDEN POCKET’ COULD BE TARGETED TO TREAT STROKES

blog article

Jan 21, 2019

Researchers have revealed a mechanism that could lead to drugs only affecting desired cells and neurons and not others. This is especially important when treating the human brain as scientists do not want to cause unwanted side effects. A research te...

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Cell Biology and Cancer CELL BIOLOGY AND CANCER

whitepaper

Jan 18, 2019

We now understand a lot about cancer. We know that it results from a series of genetic changes having to do with cell division and growth control and genetic instability, mortality, the suicide mechanism in cells; the ability of the cells to migrate;...

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Live-cell Analysis for Neuroscientists LIVE-CELL ANALYSIS FOR NEUROSCIENTISTS

whitepaper

Jan 18, 2019

Stem cell technologies using iPSCs allow researchers to create differentiated neurons and support cells to study the human brain and nervous system functions, circumventing several challenges in neurobiology research. These technologies, however, req...

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Microfluidics Solutions to Proteomics Problems MICROFLUIDICS SOLUTIONS TO PROTEOMICS PROBLEMS

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

Microfluidic platforms are becoming commonplace across biological science. To find out more about how microfluidic technology is revolutionizing protein analysis, we spoke to Tuomas Knowles, Founder and Chief Scientific Officer, Fluidic Analytics. Ru...

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Synthetic Biology Rewrites the Rules of the Genome SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY REWRITES THE RULES OF THE GENOME

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

Synthetic biology (SB) is an umbrella term that covers a wide range of scientific applications. In this article, we focus on the DNA alphabet; Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C), Thymine (T) and newly synthesized letters – the X-Y base pair...

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New Study Suggests Those Extremely Opposed to GMOs Know the Least About GMOs NEW STUDY SUGGESTS THOSE EXTREMELY OPPOSED TO GMOS KNOW THE LEAST ABOUT GMOS

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) can provide real solutions to some of our most pressing challenges. For example, with GMOs, we can: Increase productivity in agriculture, helping feed the world and combat food crises; Improve nutritional quality...

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The Gut-Brain Axis: A New Leverage To Improve Brain Conditions THE GUT-BRAIN AXIS: A NEW LEVERAGE TO IMPROVE BRAIN CONDITIONS

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

Recent progress in science pinpoints that the gut-brain axis may be modulated by a class of probiotics called psychotics. These progress shed lights on a new area of research and new ways to treat a broad spectrum of complex central nervous system di...

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Stress may raise the risk of Alzheimer STRESS MAY RAISE THE RISK OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

New research suggests that vital exhaustion, a marker of psychological distress, may raise the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Many factors may increase Alzheimer's risk, including age, family history, and genetic makeup. Certain heal...

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Stem cell’s could produce insulin to treat diabetes STEM CELL’S COULD PRODUCE INSULIN TO TREAT DIABETES

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

Scientists are developing ways that stem cells could be used to treat diabetes. These undifferentiated cells could be transformed into cells that produce insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar. But there’s a major challenge: the amount ...

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Stem cell transplant slows down MS progression STEM CELL TRANSPLANT SLOWS DOWN MS PROGRESSION

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

A preliminary clinical trial shows that stem cell transplantation, along with a tolerable dose of chemotherapy, is safe and more effective at slowing down multiple sclerosis than other existing therapies. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neu...

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Molecules associated with NMDAR may be involved in schizophrenia MOLECULES ASSOCIATED WITH NMDAR MAY BE INVOLVED IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

Genetic variants which prevent a neurotransmitter receptor from working properly have been implicated in the development of schizophrenia, according to research by the UCL Genetics Institute. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is a protein whi...

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Naturally occurring potent antibiotic revealed NATURALLY OCCURRING POTENT ANTIBIOTIC REVEALED

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

A natural antibiotic was found to be made from an enzyme, through it triggering chemical reactions that help the production of the bacterial toxin. Scientists have identified how an enzyme is able to create potent antibiotics. Researchers at Rutgers ...

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Environmental Control in Live-Cell Imaging ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL IN LIVE-CELL IMAGING

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

Imaging cells over time to create movies as they migrate along a gradient, for example, or document the molecular effects of receptor binding generally means keeping the cells happy on a microscope stage. Depending on parameters including the nature ...

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Gene Therapy Blocks Peripheral Nerve Damage In Mice GENE THERAPY BLOCKS PERIPHERAL NERVE DAMAGE IN MICE

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

Nerve axons serve as the wiring of the nervous system, sending electrical signals that control movement and sense of touch. When axons are damaged, whether by injury or as a side effect of certain drugs, a program is triggered that leads axons to sel...

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Common Food Additives May Promote Anxiety-Related And Anti-Social Behavior In Mice COMMON FOOD ADDITIVES MAY PROMOTE ANXIETY-RELATED AND ANTI-SOCIAL BEHAVIOR IN MICE

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

Food additives known as dietary emulsifiers, commonly found in processed foods to improve texture and extend shelf life, may adversely affect anxiety-related and social behaviors in mice, Georgia State researchers have found. The scientists also obse...

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Rutgers Scientist Identifies Gene Responsible For Spread Of Prostate Cancer RUTGERS SCIENTIST IDENTIFIES GENE RESPONSIBLE FOR SPREAD OF PROSTATE CANCER

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

A Rutgers study has found that a specific gene in cancerous prostate tumors indicates when patients are at high risk for cancer to spread, suggesting that targeting this gene can help patients live longer. The study, which was published in the j...

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Common Gene Disorder That Causes Serious ‘Stealth’ Disease Could Be Easily Treated COMMON GENE DISORDER THAT CAUSES SERIOUS ‘STEALTH’ DISEASE COULD BE EASILY TREATED

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

The western world’s most common genetic disorder is a “stealth condition” that causes far higher levels of serious disease and disability than previously thought, despite being easy to detect and treat. Two major studies have r...

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Deadly giant viruses with unknown genes are coming back to life DEADLY GIANT VIRUSES WITH UNKNOWN GENES ARE COMING BACK TO LIFE

video

Jan 17, 2019

A team of researchers with members from several institutions in France, Brazil, and Sweden has discovered two new strains of giant viruses, which they note have "the most complete translational apparatus of the known virosphere." In their p...

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Could bone broth boost heart health? COULD BONE BROTH BOOST HEART HEALTH?

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

Recently, bone broth has enjoyed a boost in popularity. To add to its new-found fame, a recent study concludes that it could have benefits for heart health, too. Bone broth is a soup containing brewed bones and connective tissue. Slowly cooking the b...

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How certain bacteria protect us against flu HOW CERTAIN BACTERIA PROTECT US AGAINST FLU

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

A new study brings us closer to an anti-flu probiotic pill. By subtly altering the bacteria in our nose and throat, we might be able to beat influenza. In most cases, when someone mentions the microbiome, they are referring to the bacteria in th...

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Yeast Model of Metabolic Disorders May Lead to Novel Therapies YEAST MODEL OF METABOLIC DISORDERS MAY LEAD TO NOVEL THERAPIES

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

There are hundreds of metabolic disorders - including phenylketonuria, tyrosinemia, maple syrup urine disease, and homocystinuria. These disorders lead to congenital diseases that produce a critical enzyme deficiency that interferes with the body'...

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Unlocking the Secret to Gene Activation UNLOCKING THE SECRET TO GENE ACTIVATION

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

You can think of DNA as a string of letters. As, Cs, Ts, and Gs--that together spell out the information needed for the construction and function of cells. Each cell in your body shares the same DNA. So, for cells to take on their differing roles, th...

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